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I just got into bash so I decided to write my first script. To give you a little background I want to write a script that will back up my Documents folder onto a USB stick whenever I connect the USB stick. (I am aware that software like this exists).

I have two strings at the beginning of the script:

directoryPath="/Users/USER/Documents" # Folder I want to backup
backupPath="/Volumes/backMeUp/main" # Where I want the folder to backup

For loops gives me absolute path to a file like this

/Users/USER/Documents/Comics/Bleach/Volume 004/bleach_031.zip

Until now I was using sed like this

newPath=`echo "$file" | sed "/Users\/USER\/Documents/s//Volumes\/backMeUp\/main/"`

But since I want my script to be more "open" and other-user-friendly I want to get rid of this line and make it some other way.

I also tried this with different syntax

echo $file | sed -e "s/$directoryPath/$backupPath/"

but with no luck.

My question is how can I remove part of a string with $directoryPath and replace it with $backupPath?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

basename (and dirname) are your friend(s).

Something like this:

#!/bin/bash

directoryPath="/Users/rojcyk/Documents" # Folder I want to backup
backupPath="/Volumes/backMeUp/main" # Where I want the folder to backup

f=$(basename '/Users/rojcyk/Documents/Comics/Bleach/Volume 004/bleach_031.zip')

echo ${backupPath}/${f}

Updated

#!/bin/bash

directoryPath="/Users/rojcyk/Documents" # Folder I want to backup
backupPath="/Volumes/backMeUp/main" # Where I want the folder to backup

f='/Users/rojcyk/Documents/Comics/Bleach/Volume 004/bleach_031.zip'

# delete shortest match of substring from front of string
new_f=${f#$directoryPath}

echo ${backupPath}${new_f}

Output:

/Volumes/backMeUp/main/Comics/Bleach/Volume 004/bleach_031.zip

Read more about bash string operations here

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Yeah, this is what I wanted! :) The thing is the Documents folder is also structured so I want the output to be something like this:/Volumes/backMeUp/main/Comics/Bleach/Volume 004/bleach_031.zip –  rojcyk Mar 28 '12 at 13:15

is this what you want?

kent$  cat t
$foo$bar$blah

kent$  sed 's/\$foo/\$xxx/g' t
$xxx$bar$blah

or this?

kent$  echo $foo
/f/o/o

kent$  echo $bar
/b/a/r

kent$  cat t
something /f/o/o

kent$  sed "s:$foo:$bar:" t
something /b/a/r
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sed -e "s/$directoryPath/$backupPath/"

You're on the right path, just need to manipulate the two path variables first.

The contents of $directoryPath is /Users/rojcyk/Documents, so your sed command is coming out as sed -e "s//Users/rojcyk/Documents//Volumes/backMeUp/main/". You need to escape the directory slashes so they don't affect the sed command.

Try this:

directoryPathEscaped=`echo $directoryPath | sed -e "s/\\//\\\\\\\\\//g"`
backupPathEscaped=`echo $backupPath| sed -e "s/\\//\\\\\\\\\//g"`
# At this point, directoryPathEscaped is equal to "\/Users\/rojcyk\/Documents"

# Now you can do your original command line, with the new variables.
sed -e "s/$directoryPathEscaped/$backupPathEscaped/"
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Thank you :) But I want my code to be easy to understand so I want to avoid using commands like yours sed. –  rojcyk Mar 28 '12 at 13:55
    
Actually the proper solution is to use a different separator. Ideally, find a character which does not occur in your data. Maybe colon? sed "s:$directoryPath:$backupPath:" –  tripleee Mar 28 '12 at 14:12

With bash:

directoryPath="/Users/rojcyk/Documents"
backupPath="/Volumes/backMeUp/main"
f="/Users/rojcyk/Documents/Comics/Bleach/Volume 004/bleach_031.zip"

echo "${backupPath}/${f#$directoryPath}"

Produces

/Volumes/backMeUp/main//Comics/Bleach/Volume 004/bleach_031.zip

The double slash in the middle is OK. If you don't want it: "${backupPath}/${f#$directoryPath/}"

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