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Can anyone tell me what is happening here?

<?php
// true
var_dump('\\ ' === '\ ');

// false
var_dump('\\\\ ' === '\\ ');

// true
var_dump('\\\\ ' === '\\\ ');
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2  
Have you tried printing the strings? –  Juhana Mar 28 '12 at 12:58
1  
Yeah, dumped the hexcodes. They're really different, it seems that a \\ gets collapsed to \ for some reason, but it's in a single-quoted string, it shouldn't happen there. –  Dalibor Karlović Mar 28 '12 at 13:01
2  
There's no difference whether a string is single or double quoted. The escape character works identically in both cases. –  Juhana Mar 28 '12 at 13:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

\ inside a string literal introduces several types of escape sequences, \\ is the escape sequence for a literal "\". But, \s that don't resolve to an escape sequence are also taken as literal "\".

Therefor, '\\ ' stands for the string "\ ", '\\\\ ' stands for the string "\\ ", just as '\\\ '. Try:

echo '\\\\ ';   -> \\ 

See http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php#language.types.string.syntax.single.

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I had no idea that \\ works in a single-quoted string, thought it only works on ' itself. –  Dalibor Karlović Mar 28 '12 at 13:10
    
@DaliborKarlović It is set up like that so you can have a single quoted string that ends with a backslash, if you couldn't escape the backslash you wouldn't be able to wrap string\ in single quotes. –  DaveRandom Mar 28 '12 at 13:15
    
Yeah, I get it, my bad is that I was trying to use it inside a regex searching for a literal \n (not a control char), so preg_quote('#\n#') produced a string which matched, but var_dump()-ing the value produced by preg_quote() and using that instead did not. Now I had to use #(\\\n){2,}# –  Dalibor Karlović Mar 28 '12 at 13:24

In single quoted strings, no escape sequences are interpolated. A backslash is only an escape character if it immediately precedes a single quote, or a backslash.

So:

var_dump('\\ '); // String (2) "\ "
var_dump('\ '); // String (2) "\ "
// They do match

var_dump('\\\\ '); // String (3) "\\ "
var_dump('\\ '); // String (2) "\ "
// They don't match

var_dump('\\\\ '); // String (3) "\\ "
var_dump('\\\ '); // String (3) "\\ "
// They do match

This is expected and documented behaviour, although it can be difficult to wrap you head around on the face of it.

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+1 nice, easy to read explanation ... –  ManseUK Mar 28 '12 at 13:05

In 1st example you're comparing

"\ " and "\ " which is TRUE

in 2nd

"\\ " and "\ " which is FALSE

in 3rd

"\\ " and "\\ " which is TRUE

If you print out your strings

$s = array('\ ', '\\ ', '\\\ ', '\\\\ ');
var_dump($s);

you'll get

array(4) {
  [0]=>
  string(2) "\ "
  [1]=>
  string(2) "\ "
  [2]=>
  string(3) "\\ "
  [3]=>
  string(3) "\\ "
}

All double-slashes '\\' have been converted into single-slashes '\' and sigle-slashes remain the same. Escaping works the same way inside single and double-quoted strings.

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