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When I increment local size value by multiplying by 2, I got an error although globalsize/localsize is an integer. I couldn't figure out what the problem is.

    Kernel:
     __kernel void add(__global float *a,
                   __global float *b,
                   __global float *answer,
                   __local float *shared,
                   __local float *result)
   {
      int gid = get_global_id(0);
      int lid = get_local_id(0);
      int lsize = get_local_size(0);

      float tempa, tempb;
      shared[lid]   = a[gid];
      shared[lid + lsize]   = b[gid];
      barrier(CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);

      for(int k = 0; k < lsize; k++){
        tempa = shared[lid + k];
        tempb = shared[lid + lsize + k];
        result[lid + k] = tempa + tempb;
      }
      barrier(CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);

      answer[gid] = result[lid];
    }

Lets say local size is 2^n . If n < 5, then, the program works, else it crashes. Host Code in C:

size_t global_work_size = n;    //n = 1000000
size_t local_work_size = 32;
size_t sharedSize = (2 * local_work_size) * sizeof(float);
size_t resultSize = local_work_size * sizeof(float);

err =  clSetKernelArg(kernel, 0, sizeof(cl_mem), &cmDevBufInA);  //HERE
err |= clSetKernelArg(kernel, 1, sizeof(cl_mem), &cmDevBufInB);
err |= clSetKernelArg(kernel, 2, sizeof(cl_mem), &cmDevBufOut);
err |= clSetKernelArg(kernel, 3, sharedSize, NULL);
err |= clSetKernelArg(kernel, 4, resultSize, NULL);
assert(err == CL_SUCCESS);

//EXECUTION AND READ
cl_event calculation;


err = clEnqueueNDRangeKernel(cmd_queue, kernel, 1, NULL, &global_work_size, &local_work_size,0, NULL, &calculation);
assert(err == CL_SUCCESS);
clFinish(cmd_queue);
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It is not clear what you are referring to when you say "local size". Are you referring to the variable 'local_work_size'? – Lubo Antonov Mar 30 '12 at 7:35
    
Yes.And respectively global_work_size is global size. Sorry for mismatches. – Shnkc Mar 30 '12 at 21:52

What's the max value of 'lid + lsize + k' tempb = shared[lid + lsize + k];

Lid = 31 lsize = 32 k = 32

but shared is allocated as

size_t sharedSize = (2 * local_work_size) * sizeof(float);

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