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I have simplified my code to this

 internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Child d = new Child();
        int i = 100;
        d.AddToTotal(i);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    private class Parent
    {
        public virtual void AddToTotal(int x)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Parent.AddToTotal(int)");
        }
    }

    private class Child : Parent
    {
        public override void AddToTotal(int number)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Child.AddToTotal(int)");
        }

        public void AddToTotal(double currency)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Child.AddToTotal(double)");
        }
    }
}

The issue is that this calls

public void AddToTotal(double currency)

although I am calling it with an int and it should be using

public override void AddToTotal(int number)

Using the parent returns the expected result.

 Parent d = new Child();
 int i = 100;
 d.AddToTotal(i);

Update:

Thanks to @Jan and @azyberezovsky for pointing me to the specification. I have added a virtual empty method to the base class to get around this for now.

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2  
Well, I was able to replicate the results, and ensure that it wasn't just a typo in which the method name of the int overload was different. –  Servy Mar 28 '12 at 15:08
1  
d.AddToTotal(number:i) calls the int overload, as expected, but you shouldn't have to do that... –  Servy Mar 28 '12 at 15:12
3  
See this answer for an explanation: stackoverflow.com/a/1833268/25727 –  Jan Mar 28 '12 at 15:12
    
Is this method hiding? Can you hide a base method if the signature isn't the same? –  Matt Burland Mar 28 '12 at 15:12
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A member lookup of a name N in a type T is processed as follows:

First, the set of all accessible members named N declared in T and the base types of T is constructed. Declarations that include an override modifier are excluded from the set. If no members named N exist and are accessible, then the lookup produces no match, and the following steps are not evaluated.

Thus when you use variable of Child type

Child d = new Child();
int i = 100;
d.AddToTotal(i);

method public override void AddToTotal(int number) is excluded from set, and we have only one method with name N left. Int is converted implicitly to double, so no errors occured.

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I find it very odd that overload resolution would give a higher priority to new methods over overridden methods, but apparently it does...odd. Anyone know what the reasoning behind that is? –  Servy Mar 28 '12 at 15:17
1  
@Servy see this answer from Eric Lippert for the reasoning: stackoverflow.com/a/1833866/53777 –  Dan Rigby Mar 28 '12 at 15:24
4  
@Servy: Many people find this choice odd, but there are two very good reasons for it. The first reason is that the developer who wrote the derived class method had more information than the developer who wrote the base class method. Specifically, the derived class developer knows what the implementation details of the derived class are, but the base class developer does not. Overload resolution should choose the method that was written by the guy who knew most about the object that the user is actually using. –  Eric Lippert Mar 28 '12 at 15:27
    
@Servy: Second, it prevents a form of the brittle base class failure. See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2007/09/04/… for details. –  Eric Lippert Mar 28 '12 at 15:27
1  
@dnkulkarni: The compiler chooses which virtual method slot to invoke at compile time, so how could it use anything other than the compile time type? If you want to use the runtime type then type everything as "dynamic". –  Eric Lippert Mar 29 '12 at 5:27
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This answer to this question explains the technical reasons why this happens. I have included the answer inline here for convenience, but all credit is due to tvanfosson.

See the section of the C# Language Specification on Member Lookup and Overload Resolution. The override method of the derived class is not a candidate because of the rules on Member Lookup and the base class method is not the best match based on the Overload Resolution rules.

Section 7.3

First, the set of all accessible (Section 3.5) members named N declared in T and the base types (Section 7.3.1) of T is constructed. Declarations that include an override modifier are excluded from the set. If no members named N exist and are accessible, then the lookup produces no match, and the following steps are not evaluated.

Section 7.4.2:

Each of these contexts defines the set of candidate function members and the list of arguments in its own unique way, as described in detail in the sections listed above. For example, the set of candidates for a method invocation does not include methods marked override (Section 7.3), and methods in a base class are not candidates if any method in a derived class is applicable (Section 7.5.5.1). (emphasis mine)

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