Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am allocating memory for an object and if a particular statement following the memory allocation fails, I have to delete the memory and also throw an exception.

For example say

               QSqlQuery *query =  new QSqlQuery(db);
               try {
                query->prepare(somestmt);
               }
               catch (...) {
                throwException(*query);
               }

Here where and how should I delete query if an exception is thrown?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer depends on how long you need the query object to stay alive. If you don't need it outside the try/except block, then it's probably best to use RAII to delete it as soon as you leave that block. E.g., using boost::scoped_ptr, you could do this:

try {
    boost::scoped_ptr<QSqlQuery> query(new QSqlQuery(db));
    query->prepare(somestmt);
}
catch (...) {
    throwException();
}

But from your example, it looks like you want to keep the query object, or a copy of it, around past that block. If it's ok to just keep a copy of it, then you could do this:

boost::scoped_ptr<QSqlQuery> query(new QSqlQuery(db));
try {
    query->prepare(somestmt);
}
catch (...) {        
    QSqlQuery copyOfQuery(*query);
    throwException(copyOfQuery);
}

Or this, if you don't like using boost:

QSqlQuery* query = new QSqlQuery(db);
try {
    query->prepare(somestmt);
}
catch (...) {        
    QSqlQuery copyOfQuery(*query);
    delete query;
    throwException(copyOfQuery);
}
delete query;

If you need to keep the original query itself, then you probably would need to require the exception object itself to delete it. I.e., do something like this:

QSqlQuery* query = new QSqlQuery(db);
try {
    query->prepare(somestmt);
}
catch (...) {        
    throw MyException(query);
}
delete query;

Where part of "MyException"'s contract is that it takes ownership of its argument (i.e., responsibility for deleting it).

Another option would be to use shared pointers. I.e.:

boost::shared_ptr<QSqlQuery> query(new QSqlQuery(db));
try {
    query->prepare(somestmt);
}
catch (...) {        
    throwException(query);
}

This has the advantage that the query gets deleted when the last shared pointer to it goes away, which makes memory management much easier.

share|improve this answer
    
woof! ;) did you really type all that in 60 seconds? +1 good answer –  slashmais Mar 28 '12 at 15:44
1  
You can use std::unique_ptr and std::shared_ptr in place of boost::scoped_ptr and boost::shared_ptr. –  bames53 Mar 28 '12 at 15:51
    
Awesome! Thank you Edward! –  user1065969 Apr 2 '12 at 16:50
    
@bames53: Good point (assuming you're using C++0x) –  Edward Loper Apr 2 '12 at 20:02

You should use RAII to handle this gracefully.
Either use a smart pointer instead of an raw pointer or use a resource managing class to wrap your allocated pointer so that it releases the allocated object when the scope ends.

share|improve this answer
    
If there are 2 statements inside a try block and first statement throws an exception, will the second statement be executed? –  user1065969 Mar 28 '12 at 15:37
    
@user1065969: No, it wont, once throw is called control goes to the catch handler. –  Alok Save Mar 28 '12 at 15:41

It depends on your program, if you can retry the prepare and need the pointer to be valid don't delete it, otherwise delete the memeory and idealy set the poitner to null to mark it

edit: sorry misunderstood the question - changed answer

share|improve this answer
    
it is not new that throws exception, it is prepare statemnet –  user1065969 Mar 28 '12 at 15:29

You should learn the RAII pattern. The idea is to wrap the QSqlQuery in a C++ class that does cleanup in the destructor. That way if it falls out of scope (either by a throw, return, or reaching the end of the block it is declared in) it is destructed cleanly.

share|improve this answer
    
This query has to be a local variable for me. I have a class variable that is a QScopedPointer to whom I am transferring the ownership of this query once prepare is a success –  user1065969 Mar 28 '12 at 15:34
    
If there are 2 statements inside a try block and first statement throws an exception, will the second statement be executed? –  user1065969 Mar 28 '12 at 15:37
    
@user1065969: no. the try block is exited after as soon as an exception is raised, and no subsequent statements are executed. –  Edward Loper Mar 28 '12 at 15:45

The usual idiom here is to use an std::auto_ptr, calling reset on it once you've gotten far for whatever your program logic depends on to take over. This avoids the need for a catch. Since you seem to need the catch anyway (to remap the exception), you can just as easily put a delete there and skip the std::auto_ptr. (On the other hand, one expects to see the auto_ptr, and not having it could cause the reader to ask questions.)

share|improve this answer

Instead of the no-cleanup …

           QSqlQuery *query =  new QSqlQuery(db);
           try {
            query->prepare(somestmt);
           }
           catch (...) {
            throwException(*query);
           }

just write

           QSqlQuery query(db);
           try {
               query.prepare(somestmt);
           }
           catch (...) {
               throwException(query);
           }

That's it (assuming QSqlQuery has a proper destructor).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.