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I've been reading Kernighan and Ritchie's "The C Programming Language".

I am finding it very hard to get through section 2.9 Bitwise Operators

Specifically:

Exercise 2-6 Write a function setbits(x,p,n,y) that returns x with the n bits that begin at position p set to the rightmost n bits of y, leaving the other bits unchanged.

There's answers to exercises here from a clever chap called Richard Heathfield.

Richard's answer is:

return (x & ((~0 << (p + 1))
           | (~(~0 << (p + 1 - n)))))
     | ((y & ~(~0 << n)) << (p + 1 - n));

Question

Does anyone know of a tool that will explain lines of code like the one above?

I'm hoping something exists that is similar to the various online regex explainers, but for bitwise operations.

share|improve this question
8  
Pencil and paper? – Corey Ogburn Mar 28 '12 at 15:32
1  
I don't believe there is a tool that will parse the bit-wise operator expression and explain it to you. You will most likely have to read up on each operator to understand the meaning behind the code. check out the following link cprogramming.com/tutorial/bitwise_operators.html and just work through sections at a time and try and explain it to yourself in plain English (or your language of choose) to ensure your understanding – Alex Brooks Mar 28 '12 at 15:33
1  
First thing is to break it onto multiple lines to make it easier to read. I've edited it accordingly. – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 28 '12 at 15:34
1  
You can break this function down yourself to see what the individual bits are doing. I would separate out the various bits that get ORed together and inspect them until enlightenment. – blueshift Mar 28 '12 at 15:35
3  
The best tool is a coding guideline that frowns upon developers writing code like the above. – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 28 '12 at 15:36

Lets make this human readable, shall we?

let x, y, p, and n be input

let temp1, temp2, temp3, and result be equal to zero

let temp1 be equal to p plus 1
let temp1 be equal to the one's complement of 0 shifted left by temp1
let temp1 be equal to the bitwise AND of x and temp1

let temp2 be equal to p plus 1 minus n
let temp2 be equal to the one's complement of 0 shifted left by temp2
let temp2 be equal to the one's complement of temp2

let temp1 be equal to the bitwise OR of temp1 and temp2

let temp3 be equal to p plus 1 minus n

let temp2 be equal to the one's complement of 0 shifted left by n
let temp2 be equal to the one's complement of temp2
let temp2 be equal to the bitwise AND of y and temp2

let temp2 be equal to temp2 shifted left by temp3
let result be equal to the bitwise OR of temp1 and temp2

Source: My Brain.

From this C code (expanded from the OP):

int setbits(int x, int p, int n, int y)
{
    int result = 0;

    // evaluate the expression
    {
        int temp1 = 0;
        int temp2 = 0;
        int temp3 = 0;

        temp1 = p + 1;
        temp1 = ~0 << temp1;
        temp1 = x & temp1;

        temp2 = p + 1 - n;
        temp2 = ~0 << temp2;
        temp2 = ~temp2;

        temp1 = temp1 | temp2;

        temp3 = p + 1 - n;

        temp2 = ~0 << n;
        temp2 = ~temp2;
        temp2 = y & temp2;

        temp2 = temp2 << temp3;
        result = temp1 | temp2;
    }

    assert(result == ((x & ((~0 << (p + 1))| (~(~0 << (p + 1 - n))))) | ((y & ~(~0 << n)) << (p + 1 - n))));

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't explain anything. Or is that the point? – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 28 '12 at 15:56
    
@OliCharlesworth he just asked for it to be explained, he already knew what the code did, This just helps him understand how it works. – Richard J. Ross III Mar 28 '12 at 15:58
1  
This explains what each operation does, not how it works. – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 28 '12 at 16:05
    
@Jon I hope Richard's code makes this a little easier to digest. An important lesson here is that you don't earn bonus points for condensing a complex operation into a single line of code. The original solution you were asking about is far less readable and generally doesn't perform any better with normal compiler settings. – Brian McFarland Mar 28 '12 at 16:05

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