Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've a question on how to tell which shell the user is using. Suppose a script that if the user is using zsh, then put PATH to his .zshrc and if using bash should put in .bashrc. And set rvmrc accordingly.

#!/usr/bin/env bash
export PATH='/usr/local/bin:$PATH'" >> ~/.zshrc
source ~/.zshrc

I've tried the following but it does not work : (

if [[ $0 == "bash ]]; then
  export PATH='/usr/local/bin:$PATH'" >> ~/.bashrc
elif [[ $0 == "zsh" ]]; then
  export PATH='/usr/local/bin:$PATH'" >> ~/.zshrc
fi

# ... more commands ...

if [[ $0 == "bash ]]; then
  [[ -s '/Users/`whoami`/.rvm/scripts/rvm' ]] && source '/Users/`whoami`/.rvm/scripts/rvm'" >> ~/.bashrc
  source ~/.bashrc
elif [[ $0 == "zsh" ]]; then
  [[ -s '/Users/`whoami`/.rvm/scripts/rvm' ]] && source '/Users/`whoami`/.rvm/scripts/rvm'" >> ~/.zshrc
  source ~/.zshrc
fi
share|improve this question
    
several quotes are unmatched. –  kev Mar 28 '12 at 15:44
    
Wouldn't it make more sense to put this in .profile, which is portable across shells, including sh? –  tripleee Mar 28 '12 at 16:28
    
@tripleee Hi, because it's a specific thing for bash or zsh I think... –  juanitofatas Mar 28 '12 at 19:43
1  
I suggest you read this section of the advanced bash scripting guide. –  Spencer Rathbun Mar 28 '12 at 20:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

A word of warning: the question you seem to have asked, the question you meant to ask, and the question you should have asked are three different things.

“Which shell the user is using” is ambiguous. Your attempt looks like you're trying to determine which shell is executing your script. That's always going to be whatever you put in the #! line of the script, unless you meant your users to edit that script, so this isn't useful to you.

What you meant to ask, I think, is what the user's favorite shell is. This can't be determined fully reliably, but you can cover most cases. Check the SHELL environment variable. If it contains fish, zsh, bash, ksh or tcsh, the user's favorite shell is probably that shell. However, this is the wrong question for your problem.

Files like .bashrc, .zshrc, .cshrc and so on are shell initialization files. They are not the right place to define environment variables. An environment variable defined there would only be available in a terminal where the user launched that shell and not in programs started from a GUI. The definition would also override any customization the user may have done in a subsession.

The right place to define an environment variable is in a session startup file. This is mostly unrelated to the user's choice of shell. Unfortunately, there's no single place to define environment variables. On a lot of systems, ~/.profile will work, but this is not universal. See http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/4621/correctly-setting-environment and the other posts I link to there for a longer discussion.

share|improve this answer

If the shell is Zsh, the variable $ZSH_VERSION is defined. Likewise for Bash and $BASH_VERSION.

if [ -n "$ZSH_VERSION" ]; then
   # assume Zsh
elif [ -n "$BASH_VERSION" ]; then
   # assume Bash
else
   # asume something else
fi

However, these variables only tell you which shell is being used to run the above code. So you would have to source this fragment in the user's shell.

As an alternative, you could use the $SHELL environment variable (which should contain absolute path to the user's preferred shell) and guess the shell from the value of that variable:

case $SHELL in
*/zsh) 
   # assume Zsh
   ;;
*/bash)
   # assume Bash
   ;;
*)
   # assume something else
esac

Of course the above will fail when /bin/sh is a symlink to /bin/bash.

If you want to rely on $SHELL, it is safer to actually execute some code:

if [ -n "`$SHELL -c 'echo $ZSH_VERSION'`" ]; then
   # assume Zsh
elif [ -n "`$SHELL -c 'echo $BASH_VERSION'`" ]; then
   # assume Bash
else
   # asume something else
fi

This last suggestion can be run from a script regardless of which shell is used to run the script.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Thank you for your answer. I've tried your last method. While I resides in zsh, I ran your script, but it still says I am using bash. I took a photo: screenshot –  juanitofatas Mar 28 '12 at 19:48
    
@juanitofatas You ran the script under bash, so it correctly reported it was running under bash. –  Gilles Mar 28 '12 at 20:09
    
@Gilles In the screenshot it shows I ran zsh ???? –  juanitofatas Mar 28 '12 at 20:22
3  
@juanitofatas You ran zsh in a terminal. From that interactive zsh, you ran bash to interpret a script. In that script, you tested which shell was executed the script, and the answer was bash. –  Gilles Mar 28 '12 at 20:29
    
@Gilles You're right...working on it, thanks! –  juanitofatas Mar 29 '12 at 1:24

Just do echo $0 it says -zsh if it's zsh and -bash if it's bash

EDIT: Sometimes it returns -zsh and sometimes zsh and the same with bash, idk why.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work for all shells, but is still my go-to method any time I sit down at a CLI -- it works more times than not. Shells such as Fish will not return anything for echo $0 –  kmatheny Dec 5 '14 at 1:59

An alternative, might not work for all shells.

for x in $(ps -p $$)
do
  ans=$x
done
echo $ans
share|improve this answer
    
ps -p $$ --no-headers -o cmd is a bit better. –  forivall Oct 4 '13 at 19:59

Myself having a similar problem, settled for:

_shell="$(ps -p $$ --no-headers -o comm=)"                                                                                                       
if [[ $_shell == "zsh" ]]; then                                                                                                                  
    read -q -s "?Do it?: "                                                                                                                    
fi                                                                                                                                               
elif [[ $_shell == "bash" || $_shell == "sh" ]]; then                                                                                              
    read -n 1 -s -p "Do it [y/n] "                                                                                                            
fi                                                                                                                                               
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.