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I tend to use lines of hashes and dashes for formatting and breaking up code files (e.g., CSS files):

/* -------------------------------------------------------------------
 * Layout Styles
 * -----------------------------------------------------------------*/

In vim I would use the command 80a-<ESC> which would insert 80 - characters from the location after the cursor.

I've poked around in the Sublime documentation, but haven't come across a good way of replicating the above vim command in subl. Vintage mode does not include support for this command sequence.

Is there a corresponding command that does something similar in Sublime or would a static snippet be the simplest solution?

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

I don't think there is any repeat character possibility. To do this with any character I think would require a plugin, but the basic functionality of inserting a big comment block can easily be achieved with a snippet:

Go to New Snippet through the menus and add this code:

<snippet>
    <content>
        <![CDATA[
/* -------------------------------------------------------------------
 * $0
 * -----------------------------------------------------------------*/
        ]]>
    </content>
<tabTrigger>comment</tabTrigger>
</snippet>

then save the snippet in your Packages\User folder, as something.sublime-snippet. Should work straight away, you just have to type comment (or whatever you change it to..) then hit tab, then actually write your comment title.

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That's sort of what I thought based on the docs. Thanks for confirming! – krohrbaugh Mar 28 '12 at 23:57

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