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PostgreSQL - max number of parameters in “IN” clause?

I'm developing a web API to perform RESTful queries on a resource that maps nicely to a Postgres table. Most of the filtering parameters also map nicely to parameters on the SQL query. A few of the filtering parameters, however, require a call to my search index (in this case, a Sphinx server).

The simplest thing to do is to run my search, collect the primary keys from the search results, and stuff those into an IN (...) clause on the SQL query. However, since the search could return a lot of primary keys, I wonder if this such a bright idea.

I expect that most of the time (say, 90%), my search will be returning results on the order of a few hundred. Perhaps 10% of the time, there will be on the order of several thousand results.

Is this a reasonable approach? Is there a better way?

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marked as duplicate by a_horse_with_no_name, mu is too short, Jarrod Roberson, Yuck, Graviton Mar 29 '12 at 6:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Can you not do: Where ... In (non_indexed_param1, non_indexed_param2, ...) Or ... In (select ... From search_index where ...) Rather than using two separate queries? –  beny23 Mar 28 '12 at 16:40
    
Perhaps I was too loose with my language. By "search index" I mean search server, in this case, Sphinx. I've clarified this in the question. –  David Eyk Mar 28 '12 at 17:08
    
Maybe, but perhaps not quite. That question is asking for the maximum size of the IN clause. I'm asking, what's reasonable? Or is that too subjective a distinction? I'll see about rephrasing the question. –  David Eyk Mar 28 '12 at 17:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I strongly favor the experimental approach to answer performance questions. @Catcall made a nice start, but sized his experiment much smaller than many real databases. His 300000 single integer rows easily fit in memory, so no IO is occuring; in addition he didn't share the actual numbers.

I composed a similar experiment, but sized the sample data to be about 7x as large as the available memory on my host (7GB dataset on a 1GB 1-fracctional CPU VM, NFS mounted filesystem). There are 30,000,000 rows composed of a single indexed bigint and a random length string between 0 and 400 bytes.

create table t(id bigint primary key, stuff text);
insert into t(id,stuff) select i, repeat('X',(random()*400)::integer)
from generate_series(0,30000000) i;
analyze t;

What follows are explain analyze runtimes for a select IN of sets of 10, 100, 1,000, 10,000 and 100,000 random integers in the keys domain. each query is in the following form, with $1 replaced by the set counts.

explain analyze
select id from t
where id in (
  select (random()*30000000)::integer from generate_series(0,$1)
);

Summary Times

  • ct, tot ms, ms/row
  • 10, 84, 8.4
  • 100, 1185, 11.8
  • 1,000, 12407, 12.4
  • 10,000, 109747, 11.0
  • 100,000, 1016842, 10.1

Note the plan stays the same for each IN set cardinality -- build a hash aggregate of the random integers, then loop and and do a single indexed lookup for each value. The fetch time is near linear with the cardinality of the IN set, in the 8-12 ms/row range. A faster storage system could undoubtably improve these times dramatically, but the experiment shows that Pg handles very large sets in the IN clause with aplomb -- at least from an execution speed perspective. Note if you supply the list via bind-parameter or literal interpolation of the sql statement, you will incur additional overhead on the network transmission of the query to the server, and increased parse times, though I suspect they will be negligible compared tot he IO time of execting the query.

# fetch 10
 Nested Loop  (cost=30.00..2341.27 rows=15002521 width=8) (actual time=0.110..84.494 rows=11 loops=1)
   ->  HashAggregate  (cost=30.00..32.00 rows=200 width=4) (actual time=0.046..0.054 rows=11 loops=1)
         ->  Function Scan on generate_series  (cost=0.00..17.50 rows=1000 width=0) (actual time=0.036..0.039 rows=11 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using t_pkey on t  (cost=0.00..11.53 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=7.672..7.673 rows=1 loops=11)
         Index Cond: (t.id = (((random() * 30000000::double precision))::integer))
 Total runtime: 84.580 ms


# fetch 100
 Nested Loop  (cost=30.00..2341.27 rows=15002521 width=8) (actual time=12.405..1184.758 rows=101 loops=1)
   ->  HashAggregate  (cost=30.00..32.00 rows=200 width=4) (actual time=0.095..0.210 rows=101 loops=1)
         ->  Function Scan on generate_series  (cost=0.00..17.50 rows=1000 width=0) (actual time=0.046..0.067 rows=101 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using t_pkey on t  (cost=0.00..11.53 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=11.723..11.725 rows=1 loops=101)
         Index Cond: (t.id = (((random() * 30000000::double precision))::integer))
 Total runtime: 1184.843 ms

# fetch 1,000
 Nested Loop  (cost=30.00..2341.27 rows=15002521 width=8) (actual time=14.403..12406.667 rows=1001 loops=1)
   ->  HashAggregate  (cost=30.00..32.00 rows=200 width=4) (actual time=0.609..1.689 rows=1001 loops=1)
         ->  Function Scan on generate_series  (cost=0.00..17.50 rows=1000 width=0) (actual time=0.128..0.332 rows=1001 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using t_pkey on t  (cost=0.00..11.53 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=12.381..12.390 rows=1 loops=1001)
         Index Cond: (t.id = (((random() * 30000000::double precision))::integer))
 Total runtime: 12407.059 ms

# fetch 10,000
 Nested Loop  (cost=30.00..2341.27 rows=15002521 width=8) (actual time=21.884..109743.854 rows=9998 loops=1)
   ->  HashAggregate  (cost=30.00..32.00 rows=200 width=4) (actual time=5.761..18.090 rows=9998 loops=1)
         ->  Function Scan on generate_series  (cost=0.00..17.50 rows=1000 width=0) (actual time=1.004..3.087 rows=10001 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using t_pkey on t  (cost=0.00..11.53 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=10.968..10.972 rows=1 loops=9998)
         Index Cond: (t.id = (((random() * 30000000::double precision))::integer))
 Total runtime: 109747.169 ms

# fetch 100,000
 Nested Loop  (cost=30.00..2341.27 rows=15002521 width=8) (actual time=110.244..1016781.944 rows=99816 loops=1)
   ->  HashAggregate  (cost=30.00..32.00 rows=200 width=4) (actual time=110.169..253.947 rows=99816 loops=1)
         ->  Function Scan on generate_series  (cost=0.00..17.50 rows=1000 width=0) (actual time=51.141..77.482 rows=100001 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using t_pkey on t  (cost=0.00..11.53 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=10.176..10.181 rows=1 loops=99816)
         Index Cond: (t.id = (((random() * 30000000::double precision))::integer))
 Total runtime: 1016842.772 ms

At @Catcall 's request, I ran similar queries using CTE and temp table. Both approaches had comparably simple nest loop index scan plans and ran in comparable (though slightly slower) times as the inline IN queries.

-- CTE
EXPLAIN analyze
with ids as (select (random()*30000000)::integer as val from generate_series(0,1000))
select id from t where id in (select ids.val from ids);

 Nested Loop  (cost=40.00..2351.27 rows=15002521 width=8) (actual time=21.203..12878.329 rows=1001 loops=1)
   CTE ids
     ->  Function Scan on generate_series  (cost=0.00..17.50 rows=1000 width=0) (actual time=0.085..0.306 rows=1001 loops=1)
   ->  HashAggregate  (cost=22.50..24.50 rows=200 width=4) (actual time=0.771..1.907 rows=1001 loops=1)
         ->  CTE Scan on ids  (cost=0.00..20.00 rows=1000 width=4) (actual time=0.087..0.552 rows=1001 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using t_pkey on t  (cost=0.00..11.53 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=12.859..12.861 rows=1 loops=1001)
         Index Cond: (t.id = ids.val)
 Total runtime: 12878.812 ms
(8 rows)

-- Temp table
create table temp_ids as select (random()*30000000)::bigint as val from generate_series(0,1000);

explain analyze select id from t where t.id in (select val from temp_ids);

 Nested Loop  (cost=17.51..11585.41 rows=1001 width=8) (actual time=7.062..15724.571 rows=1001 loops=1)
   ->  HashAggregate  (cost=17.51..27.52 rows=1001 width=8) (actual time=0.268..1.356 rows=1001 loops=1)
         ->  Seq Scan on temp_ids  (cost=0.00..15.01 rows=1001 width=8) (actual time=0.007..0.080 rows=1001 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using t_pkey on t  (cost=0.00..11.53 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=15.703..15.705 rows=1 loops=1001)
         Index Cond: (t.id = temp_ids.val)
 Total runtime: 15725.063 ms

-- another way using join against temptable insteed of IN
explain analyze select id from t join temp_ids on (t.id = temp_ids.val);

Nested Loop  (cost=0.00..24687.88 rows=2140 width=8) (actual time=22.594..16557.789 rows=1001 loops=1)
   ->  Seq Scan on temp_ids  (cost=0.00..31.40 rows=2140 width=8) (actual time=0.014..0.872 rows=1001 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using t_pkey on t  (cost=0.00..11.51 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=16.536..16.537 rows=1 loops=1001)
         Index Cond: (t.id = temp_ids.val)
 Total runtime: 16558.331 ms

The temp table queries ran very much faster if run again, but that's because the id value set is constant, so the target data is fresh in cache and Pg does no real IO to execute the second time.

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Did you also test those against a join on a temp table and a join on a common table expression? –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Mar 29 '12 at 13:16
    
@Catcall add runs with CTE and temp table in answer –  dbenhur Mar 29 '12 at 21:15

My somewhat naive tests show that using IN (...) is at least an order of magnitude faster than both a join on a temp table and a join on a common table expression. (Frankly, that surprised me.) I tested 3000 integer values from a table of 300000 rows.

create table integers (
  n integer primary key
);
insert into integers
select generate_series(0, 300000);

-- External ruby program generates 3000 random integers in the range of 0 to 299999.
-- Used Emacs to massage the output into a SQL statement that looks like

explain analyze
select integers.n 
from integers where n in (
100109,
100354 ,
100524 ,
...
);
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Interesting! Thanks for testing that. –  David Eyk Mar 28 '12 at 18:36

In response to @Catcall post. I couldn't resist to double test it. It is amazing!!! Rather counter-intuitive. Execution plans are similar (both queries using the implicit index) SELECT ... IN ...: enter image description here and SELECT ... JOIN ...: enter image description here

CREATE TABLE integers (
  n integer PRIMARY KEY
);
INSERT INTO integers
SELECT generate_series(0, 300000);

CREATE TABLE search (  n integer );

-- Generate INSERTS and SELEC ... WEHER ... IN (...)
SELECT 'SELECT integers.n 
FROM integers WHERE n IN (' || list || ');',
' INSERT INTO search VALUES '
|| values ||'; ' FROM (
SELECT string_agg( n::text, ',')  AS list, string_agg( '('||n::text||')', ',')  AS values FROM (
SELECT n FROM integers ORDER BY random() LIMIT 3000 ) AS elements ) AS raw


INSERT INTO search VALUES (9155),(189177),(18815),(13027),... ;

EXPLAIN SELECT integers.n 
FROM integers WHERE n IN (9155,189177,18815,13027,...);

EXPLAIN SELECT integers.n FROM integers JOIN search ON integers.n = search.n;
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