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I have the following code which copies property values from one object to another objects by matching their property names:

public static void CopyProperties(object source, object target,bool caseSenstive=true)
    {
        PropertyInfo[] targetProperties = target.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
        PropertyInfo[] sourceProperties = source.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
        foreach (PropertyInfo tp in targetProperties)
        {
            var sourceProperty = sourceProperties.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Name == tp.Name);
            if (sourceProperty == null && !caseSenstive)
            {
                sourceProperty = sourceProperties.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Name.ToUpper() == tp.Name.ToUpper());
            }
            // If source doesn't have this property, go for next one.
            if(sourceProperty ==null)
            {
                continue;
            }

            // If target property is not writable then we can not set it; 
            // If source property is not readable then cannot check it's value 
            if (!tp.CanWrite || !sourceProperty.CanRead)
            {
                continue;
            }

            MethodInfo mget = sourceProperty.GetGetMethod(false);
            MethodInfo mset = tp.GetSetMethod(false);

            // Get and set methods have to be public 
            if (mget == null)
            {
                continue;
            }

            if (mset == null)
            {
                continue;
            }


            var sourcevalue = sourceProperty.GetValue(source, null);
            tp.SetValue(target, sourcevalue, null);

        }
    }

This is working well when the type of properties on target and source are the same. But when there is a need for casting, the code doesn't work.

For example, I have the following object:

class MyDateTime
{
    public static implicit operator DateTime?(MyDateTime myDateTime)
    {
        return myDateTime.DateTime;
    }

    public static implicit operator DateTime(MyDateTime myDateTime)
    {
        if (myDateTime.DateTime.HasValue)
        {
            return myDateTime.DateTime.Value;
        }
        else
        {
            return System.DateTime.MinValue;
        }
    }

    public static implicit operator MyDateTime(DateTime? dateTime)
    {
        return FromDateTime(dateTime);
    }

    public static implicit operator MyDateTime(DateTime dateTime)
    {
        return FromDateTime(dateTime);
    }
 }

If I do the following, the implicit cast is called and everything works well:

MyDateTime x= DateTime.Now; 

But when I have a two objects that one of them has a DateTime and the other has MyDateTime, and I am using the above code to copy properties from one object to other, it doesn't and generate an error saying that DateTime can not converted to MyTimeDate.

How can I fix this problem?

share|improve this question
    
Of cource not in general case, but maybe it can help you: stackoverflow.com/questions/4501469/… –  dvvrd Mar 28 '12 at 16:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One ghastly approach which should work is to mix dynamic and reflection:

private static T ConvertValue<T>(dynamic value)
{
    return value; // This will perform conversion automatically
}

Then:

var sourceValue = sourceProperty.GetValue(source, null);
if (sourceProperty.PropertyType != tp.PropertyType)
{
    var method = typeof(PropertyCopier).GetMethod("ConvertValue",
       BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
    method = method.MakeGenericMethod(new[] { tp.PropertyType };
    sourceValue = method.Invoke(null, new[] { sourceValue });
}
tp.SetValue(target, sourceValue, null);

We need to use reflection to invoke the generic method with the right type argument, but dynamic typing will use the right conversion operator for you.

Oh, and one final request: please don't include my name anywhere near this code, whether it's in comments, commit logs. Aargh.

share|improve this answer
    
It works, but why not to put you name anywhere near this code? –  mans Mar 29 '12 at 16:14
    
@user654019: I get pretty nervous when doing either reflection or dynamic typing. Putting the two together is just too much for me :) (To be more serious, it depends entirely on the context. What will happen if this fails? Is it in an environment where the properties are pretty well controlled anyway? That sort of thing.) –  Jon Skeet Mar 29 '12 at 16:17
    
Yes, I want to use it to copy the properties between an entity object and a model object in an MVC application. So the propertoies are well known. –  mans Mar 29 '12 at 17:53

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