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I have a very basic question. I have some old FORTRAN77 code, and I complied it by f2py in Windows. When I called it in Python, the return value is 0.0 rather than the correct one.

Here is my correct FORTRAN CODE (for test) before compiling

  FUNCTION ttt (APPRAT, METRAT)

  REAL APPRAT, METRAT      

  IF(APPRAT.LE.0.0)THEN
    ttt = METRAT * 0.89218
  ELSE
    ttt = APPRAT
  ENDIF
  RETURN
  END 

Here is the python code

import al4 #the name of compiled FORTRAN 77 code which is a .pyd file
ff=(al4.ttt(-1,10))
print(ff)

If everything is correct, I should get 8.9218 as a return value, but I always get 0.0. So can anyone give me some suggestions? Thanks in advance!!

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I don't know anything about Fortran or the Fortran<->Python interface, but can it be related to the fact that -1 and 10 are integers while you are doing floating-point arithmetic? –  Emil Vikström Mar 28 '12 at 17:19
1  
Or is it because you are assigning to APPRAT instead of ttt? –  Emil Vikström Mar 28 '12 at 17:21
    
@EmilVikström Thanks for the comment. I tried to feed two float values to FORTRAN code, but I still get 0.0. But you are correct, FORTRAN did return ttt back rather than APPRAT. Thank you for your help! –  tao.hong Mar 28 '12 at 17:34
    
I don't know if this is a problem, but with the above function, ttt is not given any explicit type -- therefore fortran will treat it as a real function (since it starts with t). I would think f2py is smart enough to figure out the type ambiguity, but when dealing with fortran code, one can never be too careful ... –  mgilson Mar 28 '12 at 18:22
    
@mgilson, thanks for the comment. So what is the standard way of writing this function in FORTRAN (define a function and return a value)? Sorry for this basic question, since I am new to both Python and FORTRAN... –  tao.hong Mar 28 '12 at 19:59
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a little something that I hacked together looking at the f2py documentation:

 c This is file al4.f

      FUNCTION ttt (APPRAT, METRAT)
      IMPLICIT NONE
      REAL APPRAT, METRAT,ttt
 cf2py intent(in), APPRAT,METRAT
 cf2py intent(out) ttt      

      IF(APPRAT.LE.0.0)THEN
         ttt = METRAT * 0.89218
      ELSE
         ttt = APPRAT
      ENDIF
      RETURN
      END 

I then "compiled" it with: f2py -c al4.f -m al4 and then ran your python script above (in the same directory as al4.so -- although the extension ".so" may be different depending on your system) and it worked. the cf2py are special comments (fortran comments have a c in the first column) which tell f2py what to do with the arguments. In this case, you have 2 inputs and 1 output...

EDIT I should practice what I say in comments...(added IMPLICIT NONE to the function)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! It would be easier if Fortran supports something like "RETURN ttt" –  tao.hong Mar 29 '12 at 4:35
1  
The problem isn't here isn't Fortran. In fact, in a Fortran program, you'd call your function the way you expect result=ttt(v1,v2). The problem is with how f2py decides to create a wrapper for your function ... In this case, it seems that we needed to explicitly tell f2py what it should do with the arguments. –  mgilson Mar 29 '12 at 11:12
    
Thanks for the information! –  tao.hong Mar 29 '12 at 14:05
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