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Say I have the following structure for a list:

<ul>
    <li></li><li></li>
    <li></li><li></li>
</ul>

and each <li> is 50% width so I want every two to have the same background colour like this:

<ul>
    <li style="background:#CCC;"></li><li style="background:#CCC;"></li>
    <li style="background:#DDD;"></li><li style="background:#DDD;"></li>
    <li style="background:#CCC;"></li><li style="background:#CCC;"></li>
    <li style="background:#DDD;"></li><li style="background:#DDD;"></li>
</ul>

Can I do this using the 'nth-child()' CSS selector so as to minimise code?

share|improve this question
    
Why not use a table as it seems like that is what your are making the list act like anyway? –  jzworkman Mar 28 '12 at 17:27
    
They're not actually 50% but set widths, was just to set the scene. Tables are ugly, I prefer table-less design. –  Silver89 Mar 28 '12 at 17:31
    
Yet your list will look like a table when you have alternating colors, just seems to contradict your table-less design when your implementation will make it look like a table anyway. –  jzworkman Mar 28 '12 at 17:34
    
Instead of using the nth-child, can you give each li a class(one for one color, one for the other) then you can just set to background color of the class in css and get your result. –  jzworkman Mar 28 '12 at 17:36
    
But if I have site wide css set for all ul and li elements already then it makes sense to continue using them rather than create a whole new set of css and worry about cell borders, padding, margins etc. –  Silver89 Mar 28 '12 at 17:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
ul li:nth-child(4n+1),
ul li:nth-child(4n+2) {
  background: #CCC;
}
ul li:nth-child(4n+3),
ul li:nth-child(4n+4) {
  background: #DDD;
}

This will give you every 4th element starting with the 1st, and 2nd as color #CCC and every 4th element starting with the 3rd and 4th as #DDD

jsfiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/mU2tn/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! Can just set the default li as one colour then change just the 3rd and 4th so even less css :) –  Silver89 Mar 28 '12 at 17:50
    
Glad I could help. –  jzworkman Mar 28 '12 at 17:51
    
Updated fiddle so the li elements float: jsfiddle.net/BoltClock/mU2tn/2 –  BoltClock Mar 28 '12 at 17:53
    
@BoltClock The OP said he already had that in his css(which he didnt provide) so I didnt bother adding it all in, I was just showing how to do the coloring. –  jzworkman Mar 28 '12 at 17:55
li{
   /* All LIs*/
}
li:nth-child(4n+1),
li:nth-child(4n+2) {
   /* Li 1, 2,
         5, 6,
         9, 10 */
}
share|improve this answer

Yes you can do it with only CSS(3). Here's a jsFiddle example.

li {
    width:100%;
}
li:nth-child(4n) {
    background:#999;
}
li:nth-child(4n-1) {
    background:#999;
}
li:nth-child(4n-2) {
    background:#ccc;
}
li:nth-child(4n-3) {
    background:#ccc;
}

share|improve this answer

I believe this CSS should get what you aim to do.

ul li:nth-child(4n+1), ul li:nth-child(4n+2) {
    background: #ccc;
}

ul li:nth-child(4n+3), ul li:nth-child(4n){
    background: #ddd;
}

This JSFiddle shows it in action. http://jsfiddle.net/u2W84/

share|improve this answer

Perhaps all the other answers work, but this is what I'd do:

ul li {
    background: red;
}

ul li:nth-child(odd), 
ul li:nth-child(odd) + li {
    background: green;
}

Edit: no sorry, that didn't work :P Gimme a sec.

share|improve this answer
    
This basically works identically to ul li:nth-child(odd), ul li:nth-child(even), which selects all of them and overrides ul li completely. –  BoltClock Mar 28 '12 at 17:50
    
You're correct, didn't realize at first that :nth-child(odd) + li affects all li elements after an odd one, not just the first. –  powerbuoy Mar 28 '12 at 17:54
    
Or rather, it affects the li element after all odd ones. The selector that takes all elements that come after another is ~. –  BoltClock Mar 28 '12 at 17:55
    
Thank's to whoever upvoted but TBH this was far from correct :P –  powerbuoy Mar 28 '12 at 17:58

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