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I'm working on a project which I want to build up OO. Now I came with a function that checks or a value is valid.

private function valid(value:*, acceptedValues:Array):Boolean {
   for(var i:uint = 0; i < acceptedValues.length; i++) {
        if (value == acceptedValues[i]) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

As you can see, the function is very general and will be accessed across different classes. Now my question is; where do I store it in a OO correct way?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Real OOP would create a super class with this function in it that all the other classes that use it would subclass from it. –  The_asMan Mar 28 '12 at 19:40
    
Favor composition over inheritance (as3dp.com/2009/02/…) –  Amy Blankenship Mar 29 '12 at 1:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'll add some more input to the confusion and say this:

You won't want a single method to validate your values. Today, just passing an array of valid values might be enough. But tomorrow, you'll have something like an e-mail address to validate, and then you'll need a method that validates against a RegEx. Maybe next week, you'll need to validate against a set of values that derives from the context the value was taken from, and so on...

Using inheritance in this context, as one comment suggested, is not a good idea - you'll tightly couple your validations to the rest of the code, and sooner or later you'll find yourself changing a lot of things when only a simple validation call should have changed. Same goes for a utility class: You'll find yourself using that class reference lots of times, and if you ever choose to change your validation method, you'll have to accommodate for lots of changes in lots of places.

So, in good OO fashion, you best use an interface, let's call it Validator and let all of your validating classes implement it:

public interface Validator {
    function validate ( value : * ) : Boolean;
} 

By the way, that's also the ultimate reason not to use a static class: There are no static interfaces in ActionScript.

Now for some classes. Let's start with your own validation method, based on an array of values:

public class ArrayValidatorImpl implements Validator {
    private _validValues : Array;

    public function validate ( value : * ) : Boolean {
        return value in _validValues;
    } 

    public function ArrayValidatorImpl (validValues:Array ) {
        _validValues = validValues;
    }
}

...and the e-mail one:

public class EmailValidatorImpl implements Validator {
    public function validate ( value : * ) : Boolean {
        var reg:RegExp = /(^[a-z0-9_\+-]+(\.[a-z0-9_\+-]+)*@[a-z0-9-]+(\.[a-z0-9-]+)*\.(ac|ad|ae|aero|af|ag|ai|al|am|an|ao|aq|ar|arpa|as|asia|at|au|aw|ax|az|ba|bb|bd|be|bf|bg|bh|bi|biz|bj|bm|bn|bo|br|bs|bt|bv|bw|by|bz|ca|cat|cc|cd|cf|cg|ch|ci|ck|cl|cm|cn|co|com|coop|cr|cu|cv|cx|cy|cz|de|dj|dk|dm|do|dz|ec|edu|ee|eg|er|es|et|eu|fi|fj|fk|fm|fo|fr|ga|gb|gd|ge|gf|gg|gh|gi|gl|gm|gn|gov|gp|gq|gr|gs|gt|gu|gw|gy|hk|hm|hn|hr|ht|hu|id|ie|il|im|in|info|int|io|iq|ir|is|it|je|jm|jo|jobs|jp|ke|kg|kh|ki|km|kn|kp|kr|kw|ky|kz|la|lb|lc|li|lk|lr|ls|lt|lu|lv|ly|ma|mc|md|me|mg|mh|mil|mk|ml|mm|mn|mo|mobi|mp|mq|mr|ms|mt|mu|museum|mv|mw|mx|my|mz|na|name|nc|ne|net|nf|ng|ni|nl|no|np|nr|nu|nz|om|org|pa|pe|pf|pg|ph|pk|pl|pm|pn|pr|pro|ps|pt|pw|py|qa|re|ro|rs|ru|rw|sa|sb|sc|sd|se|sg|sh|si|sj|sk|sl|sm|sn|so|sr|st|su|sv|sy|sz|tc|td|tel|tf|tg|th|tj|tk|tl|tm|tn|to|tp|tr|travel|tt|tv|tw|tz|ua|ug|uk|us|uy|uz|va|vc|ve|vg|vi|vn|vu|wf|ws|xn|ye|yt|yu|za|zm|zw{2,4})$)/;
        return reg.exec( value.toString() );
    } 
}

Any time you need validation now, you can simply pass an instance of the interface to the class that needs it, for example:

public class MyValidatingClass {
    private var _validator:Validator;

    public function myGreatMethod ( myValue : * ) : void {
        if( _validator.validate( myValue ) ) doStuffWith( myValue );
    }

    // ...

    public function MyValidatingClass( validator:Validator ) {
        _validator = validator;
    }
}  

If your requirements change, you can simply pass a different implementation, with out ever having to touch the code for MyValidatingClass again. Clean, simple, loosely coupled - and ready to be reused in the next program you write. And the one after that. And so on...

share|improve this answer
    
+1, I'll say that this is the most OOP way you can go, this way you can do inheritance ad nauseum. –  Daniel Mar 30 '12 at 2:53
    
+1 I'm only just now realizing that OP was looking for the best object oriented solution to storing his reusable function. I only assumed from briefly reading the question that he was looking for the simplest solution to storing his function hence package level functions. I agree with Daniel, this is the correct answer. –  Taurayi Mar 31 '12 at 0:55

I would write a static class (for example "Utility") and then call the method in other classes like:

Utility.valid(...)

I think, in AS3 you write a static method like:

public static function valid(...)
share|improve this answer
1  
My inclination is to down vote this, because statics are just a nasty, nasty code smell that will bite you in various parts of your anatomy in a project of any size. However, I know that plenty of people don't care much about stinky code, so I wil leave this comment to express my opinion ;) –  Amy Blankenship Mar 28 '12 at 17:50
1  
@Amy Blankenship there is nothing wrong with using static classes. Not sure why you dislike it so much but static classes can be very powerful. Although, like any pattern if used improperly can create nightmares from everyone. –  The_asMan Mar 28 '12 at 19:44
    
Like I said, not everyone minds stinky/procedural code in what is supposed to be an Object Oriented language misko.hevery.com/2008/12/15/… . However, I don't think the person would have asked the question the way he/she did if not looking for advice on how to do it the right way. –  Amy Blankenship Mar 29 '12 at 1:42
    
@The_asMan I have to agree with Amy Blankenship on this one. I'm not about the "stinky" and "nasty" aspect of static access but static access is pretty slow in as3. The simple answer to this question is package level functions. –  Taurayi Mar 29 '12 at 5:09
    
@Taurayi ...which you can't inherit and/or substitute, if your validation method should ever want to change... –  weltraumpirat Mar 29 '12 at 7:10

Although, this Singleton would be an acceptable answer to this question I would think this would be a bit over kill
However, I am posting this as a response to Amy Blankenship.
So try not to vote down to much.

// USAGE: is as simple as importing the class and then calling the method you want.
import com.utils.validate

// and then simple just doing
Validate.valid( someValue, someArray)

// Validate.as

package com.utils{
  import flash.utils.getDefinitionByName;
  import mx.core.Singleton;

  public class Validate{
    //private static var implClassDependency:ValidateImpl;
    private static var _impl:IValidate;

    // static methods will call this to return the one instance registered 
    private static function get impl():IValidate{
      if (!_impl)   {
        trace( 'registering Singleton Validate' )
        Singleton.registerClass("com.utils::IValidate",com.utils.ValidateImpl);
        _impl = IValidate( Singleton.getInstance("com.utils::IValidate"));
      }
      return _impl;
    }

    public static function valid(value:*, acceptedValues:Array):Boolean {
      return impl.valid( value, acceptedValues )
    }
  }
}

// IValidate.as

package com.utils{
  public interface IValidate {
    function valid(value:*, acceptedValues:Array):Boolean;
  }
}

// ValidateImpl.as

package com.utils{
  [ExcludeClass]
  // we can extends a class here if we need 
  public class ValidateImpl implements IValidate{
    // the docs say we need to include this but I donno about that
    // include "../core/Version.as";

    public function ValidateImpl (){
      // call super if we are extending a class
      // super();
    }

    // instance will be called automatically because we are registered as a singleton
    private static var instance:IValidate;
    public static function getInstance():IValidate{
      if (!instance)
        instance = new ValidateImpl()
        return instance;
      }
    }

    private function valid(value:*, acceptedValues:Array):Boolean {
      for(var i:uint = 0; i < acceptedValues.length; i++) {
        if (value == acceptedValues[i]) {
          return true;
        }
      }
      return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, just for the effort of writing all this –  Daniel Mar 30 '12 at 3:22
    
Ha thanks for that –  The_asMan Mar 30 '12 at 15:24

Make a helper Class that you can then provide to Classes that need it. For example, Flex has a dedicated Class called Validator that is used in this way. You can download the Flex SDK and look at the Class to see how it's written.

Usage would be something like:

protected var validator = new IsStringInArrayValidator();

//...

validator.validate(someString, someArray);

Alternatively, you could use

valid = (someArray.indexOf(someString) > -1);

Which may not be complex enough to worry about encapsulating it.

share|improve this answer

Package level functions:

validate.as:

package utils 
{
    public function validate(array:Array, clazz:Class):Boolean
    {
        var flag:Boolean = true;

        for each(var obj:* in array)
        {
            if (!(obj is clazz))
            {
                flag = false;
                break;

            }// end if

        }// end for each

        return flag;

    }// end function

}// end package

Main.as(document class):

package 
{
    import flash.display.Sprite;
    import flash.events.Event;
    import utils.validate;

    public class Main extends Sprite 
    {
        public function Main():void 
        {
            if (stage) init();
            else addEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, init);

        }// end function

        private function init(e:Event = null):void 
        {
            removeEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, init);

            var array1:Array = ["a", "b", "c"];
            var array2:Array = ["a", "b", 3];

            trace(validate(array1, String)); // output: true
            trace(validate(array2, String)); // output: false

        }// end function

    }// end class

}// end package
share|improve this answer
    
There is no noticeable/consistent performance difference between this and defining a static function –  Daniel Mar 30 '12 at 3:10

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