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I am indifferent if you are a VB.NET or C# or other .NET developer. Answers would be appreciated no matter what language. Really looking for an idea...

I have a FACTORY class like the following:

Public Class MyFactory
    Public Shared theStuffICreated as List(Of Stuff)
    Public Shared/Static Sub Create(...)
         ...
    End Sub

    Public Shared/Static Sub ThingsToDoWhenClassIsDestroyed()
         ...
    End Sub
End Class

How can I make sure that ThingsToDoWhenClassIsDestroyed() is called when this class is "Destroyed" by the finalizer. I understand that since everything is shared/static it never really was created, but isn't there some footprint of it somewhere that needs to be destroyed? Assume this class can be used by multiple GUI and console applications and it is not feasible to make a call to MyFactory.ThingsToDoWhenClassIsDestroyed() in each GUI's Dispose method. Any ideas?

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Are you asking how to clean up the Stuff? Because if MyFactory is a shared class then there can be no instances and therefore no object lifetime. –  default.kramer Mar 28 '12 at 17:47
    
I'm not sure I really understood your question, but maybe you can use the event DomainUnload of the class AppDomain. –  schglurps Mar 28 '12 at 17:51
    
@schglurps: That was a good idea - it would have been the perfect solution if it worked but it didn't work. The method never triggers. Anything similar to AppDomain.DomainUnload? –  Denis Mar 28 '12 at 18:00
    
@default.kramer: I would like to send some e-mails, update some tables in the database and other things when the application is terminated. –  Denis Mar 28 '12 at 18:02

2 Answers 2

As you state, there is never an instance of this class, so nothing for the finalizer to do.

You could tie in to the Application.Exit event. But not sure how that's massively different from avoiding the Application's Dispose() method (whatever that is). But at least you can tie in to this event from within your code so the clean up is entirely self contained.

Alternatively there are some hacks, such as:

public class MyFactory
{
    static private MyFactory _factory;

    static MyFactory()
    {
        _factory = new MyFactory();
    }

    ~MyFactory()
    {
        // Do Cleanup
    }
}

So you can keep all you singleton logic static, but create an instance of your class in the static constructor, and call your clean up in the finalizer, which will only get called once your static class goes out of scope (i.e. at the end of the application).

Edit: In comments you state you want to send emails and update the database at this point. By the time the CLR is finalizing the last objects on the heap I'd expect you're too late to be doing anything like this. So you're back to using an event such as Application.Exit.

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maybe some event that might indicate that the application is terminating. –  Denis Mar 28 '12 at 18:01
    
Application.Exit then... –  James Gaunt Mar 28 '12 at 18:03
    
You know, the Application.Exit trick seems to be working. I added a handler like: AddHandler Application.ApplicationExit, AddressOf ApplicationExitHandler in the Shared Sub New(). –  Denis Mar 28 '12 at 18:36
    
interesting hack also but you are right, it might be too late. I think Application.ApplicationExit is working pretty well! –  Denis Mar 28 '12 at 18:45
    
scratch that, doesn't work for console applications that use this class. –  Denis Mar 28 '12 at 19:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Application.ApplicationExit was a good start. AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnloadDomain was a good start also but neither worked all the time. Application.ApplicationExit seems to work for GUI apps but not for console apps. I ended up using AppDomain.CurrentDomain.ProcessExit because that works for everything. So my code looks like this:

Public Class MyFactory 
    Public Shared/Static theStuffICreated as List(Of Stuff)
    Shared/Static Sub New()
        AddHandler AppDomain.CurrentDomain.ProcessExit, AddressOf ApplicationExitHandler 
    End Sub

    Public Shared/Static Sub ApplicationExitHandler(ByVal s As Object, e As EventArgs)
        RemoveHandler AppDomain.CurrentDomain.ProcessExit, AddressOf ApplicationExitHandler
        ThingsToDoWhenClassIsDestroyed()
    End Sub 

    Public Shared/Static Sub Create(...) 
         ... 
    End Sub 

    Public Shared/Static Sub ThingsToDoWhenClassIsDestroyed() 
         ... 
    End Sub

End Class 
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