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I've worked in and around Java for nigh on a decade, but have managed to ever avoid doing serious work with files. Mostly I've written database driven applications, but occasionally, even those require some file io. Since I do it so rarely, I end up googling around for quite some time to figure out the exact incantation that Java requires to read a file into a byte[], char[], String or whatever I need at the time.

For a 'once and for all' list, I'd like to see all of the usual ways to get data from a file into Java, or vice versa. There will be a fair bit of overlap, but the point is to define all of the subtle different variants that are out there.

For example:

  1. Read/Write a text file from/to a single String.
  2. Read a text file line by line.
  3. Read/Write a binary file from/to a single byte[].
  4. Read a binary file into a byte[] of size x, one chunk at a time.

The goal is to show concise ways to do each of these. Samples do not need to handle missing files or other errors, as that is generally domain specific. Feel free to suggest more IO tasks that are somewhat common and I have neglected to mention.

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closed as too broad by Raedwald, Paul, Jay Blanchard, Niklas B., nsfyn55 May 9 at 18:26

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Good question. I was googling for an answer to #3 (suck entire file into byte array). I was hoping to find a "just do it" function, to avoid looping on read/append block at a time. -- nobody touched that one :-( –  Roboprog Apr 30 '10 at 1:51
    

9 Answers 9

I have a couple of issues with some of the solutions offered so far. None of the file operations use anything other than the system default character encoding. As every good developer knows, there's no such thing as plain text.

Here is how to get the platform encoding to see what you're using:

public static String getDefaultFileEncoding() {
    final String keyEncoding = "file.encoding";
    final String encoding = System
            .getProperty(keyEncoding);
    if (encoding == null) {
        throw new IllegalStateException(
                keyEncoding
                        + "=null");
    }
    return encoding;
}

Alternatively, use the Charset class for a strongly typed value (alas, not every API in Java 6 has been updated to support Charset, so sometimes you need to fall back on a String). List of supported encodings.

The Reader/Writer implementations handle the character conversion. For example:

//<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
InputStream in = new FileInputStream("myfile.xml");
/*Reader reader = new InputStreamReader(in); ///WRONG!!!!!!*/
Reader reader = new InputStreamReader(in, "UTF-8"); //RIGHT

File streams are being handled in a way that may lead to resource leaks. Streams should be closed in a finally block. This ensures that they are closed even if there is an I/O error. Note that the stream initialization is before the try block.

OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream("file.txt");
try {
    //write to stream
} finally {
    out.close();
}

Here is an example of how to read a file into a String:

  /** Copies characters from reader to writer */
  public static void copy(Reader reader, Writer writer)
      throws IOException {
    final int bufferSize = 1024; // arbitrary value
    char[] buffer = new char[bufferSize];
    while (true) {
      int r = reader.read(buffer);
      if (r < 0) {
        break;
      }
      writer.write(buffer, 0, r);
    }
  }

  /** Copies contents of File to String. Decodes from given encoding. */
  public static String readToString(File file,
      Charset encoding) throws IOException {
    Writer writer = new StringWriter();
    InputStream in = new FileInputStream(file);
    Closeable resource = in;
    try {
      Reader reader = new InputStreamReader(in, encoding);
      resource = reader;
      copy(reader, writer);
    } finally {
      resource.close();
    }
    return writer.toString();
  }

Sample usage:

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    File file = new File("foo.xml");
    Charset utf8 = Charset.forName("UTF8");
    try {
      String s = readToString(file, utf8);
      System.out.println(s);
    } catch (IOException e) {
      System.out
          .println("Error:" + e.getLocalizedMessage());
    }
  }
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Why did you choose a char[1024]? Would 2048 or 4096 be better? Does it matter if it's not a power of 2? I know this is probably micro-optimization, but it could lead to performance issues if people are just cutting and pasting this as a canonical answer. –  AngerClown Jul 22 '09 at 15:50
    
@AngerClown - the 1K character buffer size is an entirely arbitrary value; I've updated the code to reflect that. –  McDowell Jul 22 '09 at 16:37
    
Thank you very much, this answer was very useful for me. –  Andrei Podoprîgora Apr 13 '11 at 6:25

I'd look into jakarta commons io. It provides some convenience methods for working with files and streams.

Here's an example of reading a file into a List of lines.

String filename = "file.txt";
FileReader fileReader = new FileReader(filename);

List lines = IOUtils.readLines(fileReader);
IOUtils.closeQuietly(fileReader);
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+1 Commons-IO all the way. Nothing else gets a look-in. –  skaffman Jul 22 '09 at 16:40

@warren-taylor; Should this be:

public static String readFromFile( String filename )
    throws FileNotFoundException, IOException {

    StringBuffer readBuffer = new StringBuffer();
    BufferedReader fileReader = new BufferedReader( 
                                       new FileReader( filename ) );

    char[] readChars = new char[1024]; 
    int count;
    while( (count = fileReader.read( readChars )) >= 0 ){                 
        readBuffer.append( readChars, 0, count );                 
    }

    return readBuffer.toString();

}

?

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Read a file one line at a time using a BufferedReader and the .readLine method, similar to @warren-taylor's answer for part 1.

public static void readFromFile( String filename )
    throws FileNotFoundException, IOException {

    StringBuffer readBuffer = new StringBuffer();
    BufferedReader fileReader = new BufferedReader( 
                                       new FileReader( filename ) );

    String sRead = null;
    do
    {
        sRead = fileReader.readLine();
        if(sRead!=null)
        {
            System.out.println(sRead);
        }
    }
    while(sRead!=null);
  }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Much better to use a while loop. Gets rid of the second test and about 4 lines of code. while ((sRead = fileReader.readLine()) != null). –  EJP Sep 25 '12 at 2:08

Unfortunately this seems to be a "I wrote it and I won't share it with anyone!" type of mentality in java.

I also pursue this question, but only in relation to text files. See my question on python-like java-io: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2802711/python-like-java-io-library

The reason I take python as something to strive for, is because of their rich text and file processing libraries that are simple to deal with. I would appreciate any feedback.

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http://mindprod.com/applet/fileio.html

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  S.L. Barth Aug 31 '12 at 10:26
    
Just another unrefereed and unreviewed hobby site. –  EJP Sep 25 '12 at 2:09

There's a big Java IO tutorial available here, covering all that, including how to get a directory listing, how all the Java streams, Reader's and Writer's work etc.

http://tutorials.jenkov.com/java-io/index.html

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Just another unrefereed and unreviewed hobby site. –  EJP Sep 25 '12 at 2:09

This link, http://www.javafaq.nu/java-example-code-127.html, seems to have a pretty good return-all-bytes function: getBytesFromFile(...)

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Just another unrefereed and unreviewed hobby site. –  EJP Sep 25 '12 at 2:10

As a solution to 1a, Read a text file into a single string, this method will do it.

public static String readFromFile( String filename ) throws FileNotFoundException, IOException {

    StringBuffer readBuffer = new StringBuffer();
    BufferedReader fileReader = new BufferedReader( new FileReader( filename ) );

    char[] readChars = new char[1024];      
    while( fileReader.read( readChars ) >= 0 ){         
        readBuffer.append( readChars );         
    }

    return readBuffer.toString();

}
share|improve this answer
    
izb is correct. The failure to deal with .read()'s return value, the number of bytes read, will get you into trouble at EOF with files that are not multiples of 1024. –  Stu Thompson Apr 11 '09 at 20:58

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