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I just posted this to a gist: https://gist.github.com/2228570

var out = '';

function doWhat(){
    out += '<li>';
    console.log(out === '<li>'); // at this point, out will equal '<li>'
    return '';
}

out += doWhat();
console.log(out, out === '<li>');
// I expect out to == '<li>', but it's actually an empty string!?

This behavior is odd, does anyone have an explanation? This is a tough thing to google. It also makes no difference if you use out += or out = out +.

EDIT: @paislee made a JSFiddle that demonstrates how if doWhat is on a separate line, it behaves as expected: http://jsfiddle.net/paislee/Y4WE8/

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1  
This is an awesome question. –  sitifensys Mar 28 '12 at 18:15
    
Edited my answer slightly to provide explanation and solution that achieves the wanted functionality (adding strings to out within the function and adding the return value to out). Just needed to switch out and doWhat() (out = doWhat() + out instead of out = out + doWhat()). –  bfrohs Mar 28 '12 at 18:45
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It seems you're expecting doWhat to be called before the += is evaluated.

But, the progression of the line is:

out += doWhat();      // original line
out = out + doWhat(); // expand `+=`
out = '' + doWhat();  // evaluate `out`, which is currently an empty string
out = '' + '';        // call `doWhat`, which returns another empty string
out = '';             // result

The out += '<li>'; inside doWhat is updating the variable, but too late to have a lasting effect.

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I'm marking this as the solution because it most clearly (to me) explains the behavior, thus answering the original question. For solutions, see stackoverflow.com/a/9913555/169491 and stackoverflow.com/a/9913382/169491 –  Andrew Mar 28 '12 at 19:39
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The confusion is that you expect doWhat() to also modify out directly. Apparently, the value that you will append to is retrieved before this function is called.

Here's the logic:

  1. Get the value of out ('')
  2. Call doWhat() and append the result to the first value ('' + '' = '')
  3. Assign the result to out ('')

Mixing return values and direct modifications this way is just asking for problems, as aptly demonstrated in your example. Perhaps you should try returning <li> instead.

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4  
I think the confusion is that he assigns to out inside doWhat. (It's not actually the same out; the inner out shadows the outer one.) –  Ismail Badawi Mar 28 '12 at 18:07
3  
+= not = ... that's totally different. –  sitifensys Mar 28 '12 at 18:08
2  
@isbadawi he didn't use var out inside doWhat, so I don't see any shadowing. Or am I blind ? –  sitifensys Mar 28 '12 at 18:11
1  
@isbadawi, actually, it is the same variable. In javascript, variables are global by default (rather than the reverse). So, unless you specifically put var in front of out inside the function, it will continue up until it either finds a var out or creates a new global called out. –  bfrohs Mar 28 '12 at 18:13
1  
@Andrew, imagine it like this: var out = '';function doWhat(){out = '<li>';return '';}out = ''+doWhat(); which is the same as out = ''+''; (out += doWhat(); == out = out + doWhat(); == out = '' + doWhat; because the value of out is read before the function is called.) Also note that what you mentioned in your first comment can be achieved by simply making a call to doWhat() rather than assigning the return of doWhat() to out. –  bfrohs Mar 28 '12 at 18:15
show 6 more comments

Imagine it like this:

// out is undefined
var out = '';
// out is ''
function doWhat(){
 out += '<li>';
 // out is '<li>';
 return '';
}
out = out + doWhat();
// out += doWhat(); is the same as:
// out = out + doWhat(); is the same as :
// out = '' + doWhat; because the value of `out` is read when `out` is first found
// out is ''

And linearized:

// out is undefined
var out = '';
// out is ''
out += '<li>';
// out is '<li>';
out = '' + ''; // first '' is value of `out` before function is called, second is what the function returns
// out is ''

Solution

var out = '';
function doWhat(){
 out += '<li>';
 return '';
}
out = doWhat() + out; // Note `out` is *after* `doWhat()`

TL;DR

Currently, your code evaluates the same as:

out = out + doWhat();

This reads the value of out before doWhat() is called. To get it working how you expect it to, simply reverse the order:

out = doWhat() + out;

This will read the value of out after doWhat() as you expect.

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Wow, I never would have thought of that for the solution! Definitely simpler than what I was going to do... –  Andrew Mar 28 '12 at 18:57
    
@Andrew, glad it works for ya :) Could you accept this answer to mark the question resolved? (See How to ask a question in the FAQ.) –  bfrohs Mar 28 '12 at 19:12
    
I will mark one of these as answered, both you and @cmw provided good solutions. –  Andrew Mar 28 '12 at 19:37
    
@Andrew, I added a simplified explanation to the end that explains the comment from the solution in greater detail :) –  bfrohs Mar 29 '12 at 17:48
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As Jonathan said above, you're returning an empty string from the function, so even though you're modifying a global variable by appending '<li>' to out inside of doWhat, javascript is going to append the returned value from the function to the value of out when you made the function call.

You can also just do:

var out = '';

function doWhat(){
    out += '<li>';
    return true;
}

doWhat();

Is there any particular reason you need to add things to the string both inside the function and after its value is returned?

[edit]

Looking at the actual example you posted in the comments to this answer, it appears to me you might be trying to conditionally return an additional value to append to out from doWhat. Correct me if I'm wrong. Your code looks like this:

var out = '', temp;

function doWhat(){
   out += '<li>';
}

out += typeof (temp = doWhat()) === 'undefined' ? '' : temp;

From this presentation, the value of temp will always be undefined because the function returns nothing that can be typed. If you are planning on having the function sometimes return a value that you then append, you can achieve what you're looking for by breaking it into two lines at the end:

var out = '', temp;
function doWhat(){
    out += '<li>';
}
temp = doWhat();
out += typeof (temp === undefined) ? '' : temp;

This is a little bit awkward, though, and I would probably try to move both appends inside the function.

var out = '';
function doWhat () {
   out += '<li>';
   if (some condition is met) { out += 'some extra string'; }
}
doWhat();
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I only added the return value to simplify the example. The real example: gist.github.com/2228570/… The reason for all of this is for a templating library named Vash: github.com/kirbysayshi/vash –  Andrew Mar 28 '12 at 18:21
    
Why are you evaluating the typeof your function call? If it has no return value it will always be undefined. Does your real function have a conditional return value? –  cmw Mar 28 '12 at 18:29
    
it's because the function call, in this situation, could return a value, or not. If it returns a value, that should be added to out, because the whole thing is a bit like a response stream. The typeof is to see if the function returns anything, and if not, replace it's output with an empty string to keep the whole concatenation valid. –  Andrew Mar 28 '12 at 18:35
    
@cmw: You mention "closure". I don't think this is a closure. (Am I wrong?) It's simply a function that references a global variable and the output that the OP is getting is a result of the order of execution. –  w3d Mar 28 '12 at 18:39
    
Andrew, that's what I suspected. I've updated my answer accordingly. @w3d, you're right, my mistake. Corrected the terminology of my answer. –  cmw Mar 28 '12 at 18:45
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