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I have looked at answers to similar questions, but I have not been able to translate the OVER() / ROWNUMBER() approach to my problem.

I have a table that contains the following columns:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Problem]( 
    [UniqueId] [int] NOT NULL, 
    [Attribute1] [int] NOT NULL, 
    [Attribute2] [int] NULL, 
    [Attribute3] int NULL, 
    [Attribute4] int NULL, 
    [Attribute5] [money] NULL, 
    [Attribute6] [varchar](50) NULL, 
) ON [PRIMARY] 

The problem is to identify the percentage of times that 'Attribute6' is populated for the set of rows when there are more than 1 value for 'Attribute5' when 'Attibute1' to 'Attribute4' were the same. My first step was to get the divisor (sample frame), which I believe is captured with the following code (included so you see my mindset):

SELECT SUM(Number)  AS Divisor
FROM    (
        SELECT Attribute1, Attribute2, Attribute3, Attribute4, COUNT(*) AS Number
        FROM    (
                SELECT Attribute1, Attribute2, Attribute3, Attribute4, Attribute5
                FROM dbo.Problem
                GROUP BY Attribute1, Attribute2, Attribute3, Attribute4, Attribute5
                ) AS levelOne
        GROUP BY Attribute1, Attribute2, Attribute3, Attribute4
        HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
        ) AS levelTwo

Then I get the Dividend (count where Attibute 6 is populated in the sample frame). This presented a problem, becuause I could not include Attribute6 in the GROUP BY but I needed to examine it. I applied a hack , using MAX() to include the UniqueId and then doing a self JOIN. Not happy about that approach.

SELECT SUM(Number)  AS Dividend
FROM    (
        SELECT MAX(UniqueId) AS UniqueId, Attribute1, Attribute2, Attribute3, Attribute4, COUNT(*) AS Number
        FROM    (
                SELECT MAX(UniqueId) AS UniqueId, Attribute1, Attribute2, Attribute3, Attribute4, Attribute5
                FROM dbo.Problem
                GROUP BY Attribute1, Attribute2, Attribute3, Attribute4, Attribute5
                ) AS levelOne
        GROUP BY Attribute1, Attribute2, Attribute3, Attribute4, Attribute5
        HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
        ) AS levelTwo
INNER JOIN dbo.Problem p
    ON p.UniqueId = levelTwo.UniqueId
WHERE p.Attribute6 IS NOT null

The figures returned pass the sniff test, but I wanted to validate it. The past several hours have been spent trying to craft a query to return all columns for the Dividend set. I would hope that such a query would also prove to be a better base for the dividend / divisor queries. I know this seems lenghty, so even hints would be appreciated.

Here is some sample data.

INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 1, 99213, 59.85, 'A')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 1, 90658, 12.61, '')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 1, 90658, 12.56, '')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 1, 87880, 10.51, '')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 1, 87880, 4.65, 'A')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 2, 99399, 104.57, 'B')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 2, 90460, 22.51, '')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 2, 90460, 25.54, 'A')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 2, 99391, 125.55, 'A')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 2, 99391, 104.57, 'B')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 17, 2, 99391, 104.57, 'B')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 18, 2, 90460, 25.51, 'B')
INSERT INTO Problem VALUES (8, 18, 2, 90744, 25.54, 'B')

In this set of 13 rows, the answer is 77.78% (7 of 9). Rows 2+3 is a group of 8 - 17 - 1 - 90658 with multiple values for attribute 5, so is part of the sample frame (divisor) but does not have multiple values for attribute 6, so is not part of the answer (dividend). The rows 4+5, 7+7, and 9+10+11 meet both tests. Thanks for the input!

share|improve this question
    
Can you show us some test data and expected result?. –  Lamak Mar 28 '12 at 18:27
    
I doubt I can publish actual data here (had to rename all the columns so you can imagine how they feel about data!). I will try to mock up some data in the morning if no luck with other answers. BTW - I have learned a few key SQL tricks from your answers to others. thanks –  Scott Mar 28 '12 at 21:41
    
Row 6 was the same as row 10, so edited to make the description correct. –  Ben Mar 29 '12 at 8:43
    
Updated answer to get the answer you wanted ... however not sure the specification is still correct. –  Ben Mar 29 '12 at 9:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

SQL is easier to understand inside out.

The problem is to identify the percentage of times that 'Attribute6' is populated for the set of rows when there are more than 1 value for 'Attribute5' when 'Attibute1' to 'Attribute4' were the same.

Breaks down like this:

  1. Where attributes 1-4 are the same
  2. And there is more than one value for attribute5
  3. Give the percentage of times Attribute6 is populated

Like so:

select

    attribute1, attribute2, attribute3, attribute4,

    -- 3. give percentage of times Attribute6 is populated
    -- Percentage is numerator * 100 over denominator
    -- 3.a. Numerator: Number of times attribute 6 is populated
    sum( case when attribute6 is null then 0 else 1 end)
    * 100
    / 
    -- 3.b. Denominator: Total number of attribute5 found
    count(attribute5)
from Problem p

-- 1. where attributes 1-4 are the same
group by attribute1, attribute2, attribute3, attribute4
-- 2. And there is more than one value for attribute5
having count(distinct attribute5) > 1

You haven't been clear on the definiton of "attribute5 has more than one value" - I have assumed you mean more than one distinct value. If you just meant "not null" that is easy too - just replace the count(distinct) with the appropriate expression to get what you want.

Edit

With the added clarity that we are looking for a single number, which is the percentage of groups where there are multiple distinct values of Attribute5, which also have multiple values of attribute6.

It's not clear how you want to handle nulls and empty strings, so I am assuming that there are no nulls and empty strings count as a normal value.

Try the following:

select
    sum(nDistinct5) as nDemoninator,
    sum(nDistinct6) as nNumerator,

    sum(nDistinct6) 
    * 100.0
    /
    sum(nDistinct5)
from
(
    select

        attribute1, attribute2, attribute3, attribute4,

        -- 3. give percentage of times Attribute6 is populated
        -- Percentage is numerator * 100 over denominator
        -- 3.a. Numerator: Number of times attribute 6 is populated
        count(distinct attribute6) as nDistinct6,
        -- 3.b. Denominator: Total number of attribute5 found
        sum(1) as nDistinct5
    from Problem p

    -- 1. where attributes 1-4 are the same
    group by attribute1, attribute2, attribute3, attribute4
    -- 2. And there is more than one value for attribute5
    having count(distinct attribute5) > 1
) g

For eyeballing purposes, join the original data onto the subquery g so you can manually confirm the logic is correct.

select 
    p.*, g.nDistinct6, g.nDistinct5
from 
( 
    select 

        attribute1, attribute2, attribute3, attribute4, 

        -- 3. give percentage of times Attribute6 is populated 
        -- Percentage is numerator * 100 over denominator 
        -- 3.a. Numerator: Number of times attribute 6 is populated 
        count(distinct attribute6) as nDistinct6, 
        -- 3.b. Denominator: Total number of attribute5 found 
        sum(1) as nDistinct5 
    from Problem p 

    -- 1. where attributes 1-4 are the same 
    group by attribute1, attribute2, attribute3, attribute4 
    -- 2. And there is more than one value for attribute5 
    having count(distinct attribute5) > 1 
) g

right outer join Problem p
on p.attribute1 = g.attribute1
and p.attribute2 = g.attribute2
and p.attribute3 = g.attribute3
and p.attribute4 = g.attribute4
order by p.attribute1, p.attribute2, p.attribute3, p.attribute4

This displayes every row from Problem, and the corresponding group totals for number of distinct Attribute6 and Attribute5, so you can validate that these are indeed the numbers you want to use. If there are too many rows and you just want to eyeball a few hundred, you can use top

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you are correct, I meant more than one distinct value. I will try this later - it looks wonderfully simple. –  Scott Mar 28 '12 at 21:36
    
I added some demo data, and I tried to clarify that I need all of the times that 'Attribute6' is populated for the entire set of rows when there are more than 1 value for 'Attribute5' when 'Attibute1' to 'Attribute4' were the same. Your soultion (which I appreciate greatly and will use as a starting piont after the morning meeteings) calculates a percentage for each grouping of attributes 1-4. –  Scott Mar 29 '12 at 2:00
    
I like this approach, but we the real problem (hence the title) that I am struggling with is to obtain the UniqueId for each row in the sample frame (the divisor) so I can validate these figures. As soon as I introduce a GROUP BY I cannot include the UniqueID... –  Scott Mar 29 '12 at 14:13
    
To validate the results, hoist the query out and order by the groups. I.e. you can show the inner query g ordered by the group-by attributes, then count them by hand to validate it is doing what you want. To compare to the raw data, just select the raw data with the same order-by. You could also join on the subquery g if that helps. –  Ben Mar 29 '12 at 15:23
    
Thank you. I had already done that. But removing the GROUP BY eliminates the ability to use HAVING, so instead of 2K rows I have 142K rows to eyeball. Ugh. That's basically why I posted the issue - not to calculate the pecent (my original code does that) but to craft a query that would include an ID that I can use to get the row. The few columns we group on currently do not identify a row. I will try adding other columns to the group (and thus the select) and see if I can get the same results but enough data to obtain a unique row. –  Scott Mar 29 '12 at 16:50

Not sure if I understand fully your question, but I think you can avoid the join on the dividend query by adding the Where P.Attribute6 is not null to the inner query (level 1)

Hope this helps u

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