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i have 4 dictionarys that contain 800k strings with 200 to 6000 characters. when i load it into memory it takes up about 11 gigs of memory. it is taking me 2 minutes to parse the data and 2 minutes to output the data. is there anyway to output the data faster than what i am using below? I am only getting 20-31 MB per second disk IO and I know the hard drive can do 800ish

var hash1 = new Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>>(f.Count + 2);
var hash2 = new Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>>(f.Count + 2);
var hash3 = new Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>>(f.Count + 2);
var hash4 = new Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>>(f.Count + 2);
....
foreach (var me in mswithfilenames)
{
    filename = me.Key.ToString();
    string filenamef = filename + "index1";
    string filenameq = filename + "index2";
    string filenamefq = filename + "index3";
    string filenameqq = filename + "index4";

    StreamWriter sw = File.AppendText(filenamef);
    StreamWriter sw2 = File.AppendText(filenameq);
    StreamWriter swq = File.AppendText(filenamefq);
    StreamWriter sw2q = File.AppendText(filenameqq);

    for (i = 0; i <= totalinhash; i++)
    {
        if (hashs1[i].ContainsKey(filenamef))
        {
            sw.Write(hashs1[i][filenamef]);
        }
        if (hashs2[i].ContainsKey(filenameq))
        {
            sw2.Write(hashs2[i][filenameq]);
        }
        if (hashs3[i].ContainsKey(filenamefastaq))
        {
            swq.Write(hash4[i][filenamefastaq]);
        }

        if (hash4[i].ContainsKey(filenameqq))
        {
            sw2q.Write(hash4[i][filenameqq]);
        }
    }

    sw.Close();
    sw2.Close();
    sw3.Close();
    sw4.Close();
    swq.Close();
    sw2q.Close();
}
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6  
At a glance you are performing twice as many hash lookups as required. Use Dictionary.TryGetValue instead. If that returns false you know it doesn't exist, if it returns true you already have your value. Left as a comment because I don't have time to analyze the problem at a higher level. Also.... using blocks are your friend. What happens if any of those calls to Write throw an exception? You won't clean up after your streams as quickly as you would like. –  Ed S. Mar 28 '12 at 18:48
1  
This might be a better question for code review since you aren't actually encountering a problem. –  M.Babcock Mar 28 '12 at 18:51
    
what is mswithfilenames ? –  Tigran Mar 28 '12 at 18:53
    
@M.Babcock thanks i posted it in code review –  user1158903 Mar 28 '12 at 18:58
2  
Please do not cross-post questions across SE sites as it creates unnecessary duplication and hassle for people on both sites. –  BoltClock Mar 29 '12 at 2:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The most expensive part is the I/O. And this loop:

for (i = 0; i <= totalinhash; i++)
{
    if (hashs1[i].ContainsKey(filenamef))
    {
        sw.Write(hashs1[i][filenamef]);
    }
    if (hashs2[i].ContainsKey(filenameq))
    {
        sw2.Write(hashs2[i][filenameq]);
    }
    ...
}

is alternating between different files. That will probably cause some extra head-movement and it creates fragmented files (slowing future actions on those files).

I would use:

for (i = 0; i <= totalinhash; i++)
{
    if (hashs1[i].ContainsKey(filenamef))
    {
        sw.Write(hashs1[i][filenamef]);
    }
}

for (i = 0; i <= totalinhash; i++)
{
    if (hashs2[i].ContainsKey(filenameq))
    {
        sw2.Write(hashs2[i][filenameq]);
    }
}
...

But of course you should measure this. It won't make much difference on SSDs for instance, only on mechanical disks.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks i'm on a mechanical disk and i'll check the performance in a few moments –  user1158903 Mar 28 '12 at 20:04
    
thanks that cut run time by 27%! –  user1158903 Mar 28 '12 at 20:16

Did you measure anything? It sounds like you have non trivial amount of data to read and write - so first step would be to establish absolute baseline for your disk subsystem on how fast it reads/writes that much of data. Simple read of the file followed by write to new file of approximate amount of data you expect will show how far you can go in optimizing it.

You may fine that your code itself does not take too much more time over reading/writing.

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1  
yes i did measure the times and simply copy and pasteing the files from one folder to another takes about 3 second (2.5gigs with the hard drive that i have at 855meg/s). i'd like to get the writing from memory that fast too. –  user1158903 Mar 28 '12 at 19:08

Can you have a Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, myCustomDataHolder>> rather than four separate parallel Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>? Not only should it reduce the space consumed quite a lot, but it means 1/4 the dictionary lookups.

It's not quite clear if the dictionaries are entirely parallel given your question, but it seems likely enough to me.

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the information in each of the dictionarys is unique to that hash i dont really know how i could merge them –  user1158903 Mar 28 '12 at 19:02
    
You're using the filename as the key in all of the dictionaries, you're just appending an 'index1' 'index2' etc. to each one. If you're populating those dictionaries in the same manor just use the plain filename as the key without appending 'index1' etc. If the data already has 'index1' appended could you remove it? –  Servy Mar 28 '12 at 19:07
    
let me think about that for a few minutes that seems like i might make a bug if i tried to do it haha :) –  user1158903 Mar 28 '12 at 19:16
    
+1, maybe not the correct answer to this specific question, but a correct answer to many others –  Denzil May 17 '12 at 22:42

I'd like to add that

if (hashs1[i].ContainsKey(filenamef))
{
   sw.Write(hashs1[i][filenamef]);
}

Takes 2 hash table accesses. One for the contains key, and one for the actual access. Many dictionary accesses can add up, so you can halve these accesses by using the dictionary tryGetValue method. This will combine these two calls into one. I could explain how this works, but this does the job better than I could: http://www.dotnetperls.com/trygetvalue

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