Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to implement a function that fills up a vector and then returns an rvalue reference. I tired something like:

std::vector<int> &&fill_list() {
  std::vector<int> res;
  ... do something to fill res ...
  return res;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  std::vector<int> myvec = fill_list();
  return 0;
}

but that doesn't work, I get the following error:

error: invalid initialization of reference of type 'std::vector<int>&&' from expression of type 'std::vector<int>'

So, all in all, how is the right way of doing it? I don't think I get rvalue references just yet.

share|improve this question
6  
Even if that did compile, it would return a dangling reference. Why do you want to return an rvalue reference? Why wouldn't you simply return by value? –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 19:48
3  
I think you've got that point about rvalue references wrong: it is that a value that would be destroyed anyway can be moved instead of needing to copy it. If you directly return an rvalue reference, there is no value anymore because it has been destroyed before you had the chance to move its contents. –  leftaroundabout Mar 28 '12 at 19:53
3  
@Sambatyon : If you returned by value, then move semantics would be used (if NRVO didn't kick in). What you've shown is indeed a dangling reference, just the same as if your return type was std::vector<int>&. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 19:53
3  
@Sambatyon: idljarn is correct, returning an rvalue-reference and a lvalue-reference makes no difference here the reference will point to an object that has just been destroyed. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 28 '12 at 20:27
1  
See also Is returning by rvalue reference more efficient –  Bo Persson Mar 28 '12 at 21:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You seem to be confused as to what an rvalue reference is and how it relates to move semantics.

First thing's first: && does not mean move. It is nothing more than a special reference type. It is still a reference. It is not a value; it is not a moved value; it is a reference to a value. Which means it has all of the limitations of a reference type. Notably, it must refer to a value that still exists. So returning a dangling r-value reference is no better than returning a dangling l-value reference.

"Moving" is the process of having one object claim ownership of the contents of another object. R-value references facilitate move semantics, but simply having a && does not mean anything has moved. Movement only happens when a move constructor (or move assignment operator) is called; unless one of those two things is called, no movement has occurred.

If you wish to move the contents of a std::vector out of your function to the user, you simply do this:

std::vector<int> fill_list() {
  std::vector<int> res;
  ... do something to fill res ...
  return res;
}

Given this usage of fill_list():

std::vector<int> myvec = fill_list();

One of two things will happen. Either the return will be elided, which means that no copying or moving happens. res is constructed directly into myvec. Or res will be moved into the return value, which will then perform move-initialization of myvec. So again, no copying.

If you had this:

std::vector<int> myvec;
myvec = fill_list();

Then again, it would be moved into. No copying.

C++11 knows when it's safe to implicitly move things. Returning a value by value rather than by reference or something is always a safe time to move. Therefore, it will move.

share|improve this answer
    
Sadly, C++11 is very strict about when it tries to actually move local variables. It only allows the compiler to do so if the conditions for copy elision apply, but copy elision can't be performed for whatever reason. This is overly strict, but can't be helped in this standard. –  Xeo Mar 29 '12 at 12:02

For a discussion of rvalue references you can read what Bjarne Stroustrup, the author of C++, has to say about them here:

http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/C++0xFAQ.html#rval

Addressing your specific example, the short answer is that due to the Named Return Value Optimization - which is a de facto standard C++ compiler feature even pre-C++11 - if you simply return-by-value the compiler will tie up res and myvec efficiently like you want:

std::vector<int> fill_list() {
    std::vector<int> res;
    ... do something to fill res ...
    cout << &res << endl; // PRINT POINTER
    return res;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
     std::vector<int> myvec = fill_list();
     cout << &myvec << endl; // PRINT POINTER
     return 0;
}

The two "PRINT POINTER" lines will print the same pointer in both cases.

The vector myvec and the vector res in the above will be the same vector with the same storage. No copy constructor or move constructor will be called. In a sense res and myvec will be two aliases of the same object.

This is even better than using a move constructor. myvec is constructed and "filled up" in-place.

The compiler achieves this by compiling the function in an "inplace" mode overlaying an immediate stack position in the callers stack frame with the callees local result variable, and simply leaving it there after the callee returns.

In this circumstance we say that the constructor has been elided. For more information see here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Return_value_optimization

In the event that you were assigning the result of fill_list in a non-constructor context, than as a return-by-value results in an xvalue (short for "expiring" value, a type of rvalue), the move assignment operator of the target variable would be given preference if it is available.

share|improve this answer
    
"In this circumstance we say that the copy construction has been elided." Note that this also applies to move construction. –  Nicol Bolas Mar 28 '12 at 20:32
2  
RVO is a red herring in this instance. It is good advice to write code that can benefit from it, but that doesn't help understand the issue at hand. –  Luc Danton Mar 28 '12 at 21:31
1  
"std::move and std::forward are only relevant if there is an underlying overload resolution between an rvalue and lvalue parameter in the first place" Huh? Where did you get this idea? It makes no sense at all. In any case, I didn't downvote, so no need to appease me. ;-] (Also, the OP is confused to begin with, hence asking the question in the first place; that he marked your answer with the green tick doesn't make it more relevant or correct.) –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 22:44
1  
"std::move and std::forward have no use except to modify which overload is picked." Patently wrong -- I would assert that you don't understand rvalue references. std::move turns an lvalue into an rvalue, and std::forward prevents an rvalue from incorrectly decaying into an lvalue during perfect forwarding. Your obstinance is indeed tempting me to downvote after all... Do yourself a favor and go read this answer. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 23:09
1  
I wouldn't use std::move or std::forward to alter the lifetime of temporaries, nor did I say I would. Let's make this kindergarten simple for you: 1) std::move and std::forward affect lvalue-ness or rvalue-ness. 2) Lvalue-ness or rvalue-ness affect semantics beyond what overloads are selected. 3) "std::move and std::forward have no use except to modify which overload is picked." is thus an oversimplification at best, but really just wrong. Enjoy your "green tick", ignorance doesn't win out very often on SO. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 23:33

The return statement is an error because you atempt to bind an rvalue reference (the return type) to an lvalue (the vector res). An rvalue reference can only be bound to an rvalue.

Also, as others already mentioned, returning a local variable when the return type is a reference type is dangerous, because the local object will be destroyed after the return statement, then you get a reference that refers to an invalid object.

If you want to avoid the copy construction during the return statement, just using a non-reference type might already works due to a feature called copy elision. the vector res in your fill_list function may be directly constructed into the vector myvec in your main function, so no copy or move construction is invoked at all. But this feature is allowed by Standard not required, some copy construction is not omitted in some compiler.

share|improve this answer

If you just remove the && from your function it should work, but it will not be a reference. fill_list() will create a vector and return it. During the return a new vector will be created. The first vector that was created inside fill_list() will be copied to the new vector and then will be destroyed. This is the copy constructor's work.

share|improve this answer
1  
If this returned by value, it would use a move constructor, not a copy constructor. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 19:54
    
Actually, it wouldn't necessarily use any constructors at all because modern compilers can do copy elision for return values. –  leftaroundabout Mar 28 '12 at 19:56
    
Didn't know that. Actually it's about time they do! :-) –  CodeChords man Mar 28 '12 at 20:15
1  
@CodeChordsman : They have for years (at least 7). ;-] –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 20:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.