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I am implementing a condition variable's wait operation. I have a struct for my condition variable. So far, my struct has a monitor, a queue, and a spinlock. But I am not sure if a condition variable should have a queue by itself. My notify looks like this:

 void uthread_cv_notify (uthread_cv_t* cv) {
     uthread_t* waiter_thread;
     spinlock_lock(&cv->spinlock);
     waiter_thread   = dequeue (&cv->waiter_queue);
     if(waiter_thread)
     {
        uthread_monitor_exit(cv->mon);
        uthread_stop(TS_BLOCKED);
        uthread_monitor_enter(cv->mon);
        spinlock_unlock(&cv->spinlock);
     }
} 

But I wonder if in a notify function or a wait function I should just enqueue and dequeue in the monitor's waiting queue?

Thanks

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The signal operation (that you're calling notify) should not require that the monitor be entered. This is inefficient.

It seems like you're trying to implement some clumsy old fashioned condition/monitor system in which the caller of "notify" must be inside the monitor, and it is guaranteed that if a thread is waiting, that thread gets the monitor before the "notify" caller returns to the monitor. (And that waiting thread does not have to have a loop re-testing the condition, either.)

That may be how C. A. R. Hoare initially described monitors and conditions, but the formalism is impractical/inefficient on modern multiprocessor systems, and also on threading implementations which do not have the luxury of being extremely tightly integrated with the low level scheduler (to be able to precisely control which thread gets to run when, so there are no races about who acquires a mutex first: for instance, to be able to transfer a thread from one wait queue to another, etc.)

Note how you're extending the critical section of the monitor over the spinlock_lock operation and over the dequeue operation. Neither of these belong under the monitor. The spinlock is independent, and the queue is guarded by the spinlock, not by the monitor. The monitor should protect the shared variables of the user code only (the special atomic property of of the wait operation).

share|improve this answer

So why do you need an extra queue? You are already storing all the threads that need to be notified.

Also, you probably want to do something like this:

void uthread_cv_notify (uthread_cv_t* cv) {
     uthread_t* waiter_thread;
     spinlock_lock(&cv->spinlock);
     waiter_thread   = dequeue (&cv->waiter_queue);
     if(waiter_thread)
     {
        uthread_monitor_exit(cv->mon);
        uthread_stop(TS_BLOCKED);
        uthread_monitor_enter(cv->mon);
     }
     spinlock_unlock(&cv->spinlock);
} 

This will ensure that the spin lock is always released.

share|improve this answer
    
So you are saying the monitor's queue would be enough, and I wouldnt need another queue for my condition variable? – BBB Mar 28 '12 at 20:05
    
Yes. If you implement it properly, there is no need for a separate queue for the condition variable itself. – Neo Mar 28 '12 at 21:19

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