Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to delete a file, after writing something in it, with FileOutputStream. This is the code I use for writing:

private void writeContent(File file, String fileContent) {
    FileOutputStream to;
    try {
        to = new FileOutputStream(file);
        to.write(fileContent.getBytes());
        to.flush();
        to.close();
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

As it is seen, I flush and close the stream, but when I try to delete, file.delete() returns false.

I checked before deletion to see if the file exists, and: file.exists(), file.canRead(), file.canWrite(), file.canExecute() all return true. Just after calling these methods I try file.delete() and returns false.

Is there anything I've done wrong?

share|improve this question
    
I forgot to mention that no exception is caught. –  Jenny Smith Jun 13 '09 at 20:51
    
Are you sure the file isn't used by another process ? Did you lock it ? Does it work with deleteOnExit + exiting ? –  instanceof me Jun 13 '09 at 20:55
    
What OS are you running on? Can you manually delete the file? Something might hold an open handle to the file. –  kd304 Jun 13 '09 at 20:56
    
How can I find out if it's used by another process? I didn't lock it. I can't use deleteOnExit method, because I need to delete the file and continue my applycation after that.The idea is that I try to emty a temporary folder, which is used to store files from a different folder for one session. When I press the open button on my applycation, it means the folder must be emptied, to make room for some other files. If I skip the part when I write in that file, it's ok, and I can delete it. –  Jenny Smith Jun 13 '09 at 21:03
    
I'm on Win XP. I can delete the file manually just fine, but I can't run my applycation like that. It's supposed to be deleted from the application. –  Jenny Smith Jun 13 '09 at 21:05
show 5 more comments

17 Answers 17

Another bug in Java. I seldom find them, only my second in my 10 year career. This is my solution, as others have mentioned. I have nether used System.gc(). But here, in my case, it is absolutely crucial. Weird? YES!

finally
{
    try
    {
        in.close();
        in = null;
        out.flush();
        out.close();
        out = null;
        System.gc();
    }
    catch (IOException e)
    {
        logger.error(e.getMessage());
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
YEP! That was it for me too. I was using FileOutputStream. After setting out=null and then explicit call to System.gc() , it worked. –  djangofan Sep 9 '11 at 0:28
    
Worked for me too... i wonder why –  Kevin Sep 20 '11 at 13:22
    
whoooaaa!! it actually DOES work! –  alex Sep 6 '12 at 16:36
6  
4  
Although I did not open it with any kind of stream (just doing a new File(path)), I encountered the same problem and adding System.gc() before the delete() made it work! –  ixM Mar 12 '13 at 8:15
show 3 more comments
up vote 36 down vote accepted

It was pretty odd the trick that worked. The thing is when I have previously read the content of the file, I used BufferedReader. After reading, I closed the buffer.

Meanwhile I switched and now I'm reading the content using FileInputStream. Also after finishing reading I close the stream. And now it's working.

The problem is I don't have the explanation for this.

I don't know BufferedReader and FileOutputStream to be incompatible.

share|improve this answer
4  
I would argue it's a bug then: java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/… It says in there that the method should close the stream and any resources associated with it. I usually like to close all the streams in the inverted sequence (the last ones to be open are the first ones to be closed) using IOUtils.closeQuietly, but it tends to be overkill. –  Ravi Wallau Jun 14 '09 at 5:55
2  
I was having this exact problem I and I thought I was going crazy. Thanks for the solution! –  Electrons_Ahoy Dec 13 '10 at 20:18
10  
It's 2011 with JDK 7 and the problem still isn't fixed. I'm so glad I found this thread - I simply couldn't figure out what was wrong... –  David Aug 17 '11 at 13:40
add comment

I tried this simple thing and it seems to be working.

file.setWritable(true);
file.delete();

It works for me.

share|improve this answer
    
For this problem; generally people talk about setting references as null or calling system.gc(); but for me even after server restart files were not getting deleted !! But file.setWritable(true); just worked.. –  Deepak Jun 6 '12 at 13:33
add comment

You're only closing the file if you get to the end of the try block without throwing an exception. You should close it in a finally block instead... it's possible that's the problem, if any exceptions were thrown.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 - nope, i have the same issue in Scala using a try/finally –  bharal Jul 23 '13 at 9:12
add comment

As Jon Skeet commented, you should close your file in the finally {...} block, to ensure that it's always closed. And, instead of swallowing the exceptions with the e.printStackTrace, simply don't catch and add the exception to the method signature. If you can't for any reason, at least do this:

catch(IOException ex) {
    throw new RuntimeException("Error processing file XYZ", ex);
}

Now, question number #2:

What if you do this:

...
to.close();
System.out.println("Please delete the file and press <enter> afterwards!");
System.in.read();
...

Would you be able to delete the file?

Also, files are flushed when they're closed. I use IOUtils.closeQuietly(...), so I use the flush method to ensure that the contents of the file are there before I try to close it (IOUtils.closeQuietly doesn't throw exceptions). Something like this:

...
try {
    ...
    to.flush();
} catch(IOException ex) {
    throw new CannotProcessFileException("whatever", ex);
} finally {
    IOUtils.closeQuietly(to);
}

So I know that the contents of the file are in there. As it usually matters to me that the contents of the file are written and not if the file could be closed or not, it really doesn't matter if the file was closed or not. In your case, as it matters, I would recommend closing the file yourself and treating any exceptions according.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried the first thing - closing the output stream in the finally block. And it didn't work. What did happened if I tried to read after thatm is that I got a message saying the stream was closed. When switching and reading the file with FileInputReader, none of the "bad" thing described above happened. –  Jenny Smith Jun 14 '09 at 16:33
add comment

There is no reason you should not be able to delete this file. I would look to see who has a hold on this file. In unix/linux, you can use the lsof utility to check which process has a lock on the file. In windows, you can use process explorer.

for lsof, it's as simple as saying:

lsof /path/and/name/of/the/file

for process explorer you can use the find menu and enter the file name to show you the handle which will point you to the process locking the file.

here is some code that does what I think you need to do:

FileOutputStream to;

try {
    String file = "/tmp/will_delete.txt";
    to = new FileOutputStream(file );
    to.write(new String("blah blah").getBytes());
    to.flush();
    to.close();
    File f = new File(file);
    System.out.print(f.delete());
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IOException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}

It works fine on OS X. I haven't tested it on windows but I suspect it should work on Windows too. I will also admit seeing some unexpected behavior on Windows w.r.t. file handling.

share|improve this answer
1  
For windows, you can download the free Process Explorer from MS: technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx –  kd304 Jun 13 '09 at 21:10
    
-1 Why are you deleting f and not file? –  bharal Jul 23 '13 at 9:15
add comment

Hopefully this will help. I came across similar problem where i couldn't delete my file after my java code made a copy of the content to the other folder. After extensive googling, i explicitly declared every single file operation related variables and called the close() method of each file operation object, and set them to NULL. Then, there is a function called System.gc(), which will clear up the file i/o mapping (i'm not sure, i just tell what is given on the web sites).

Here is my example code:

public void start() {
    File f = new File(this.archivePath + "\\" + this.currentFile.getName());
    this.Copy(this.currentFile, f);

    if(!this.currentFile.canWrite()){
        System.out.println("Write protected file " +
           this.currentFile.getAbsolutePath());

        return;
    }


    boolean ok = this.currentFile.delete();
    if(ok == false){
        System.out.println("Failed to remove " + this.currentFile.getAbsolutePath());
        return;
    }
}

private void Copy(File source, File dest) throws IOException {
    FileInputStream fin;
    FileOutputStream fout;
    FileChannel cin = null, cout = null;
    try {
        fin = new FileInputStream(source);
        cin = fin.getChannel();
        fout = new FileOutputStream(dest);
        cout = fout.getChannel();

        long size = cin.size();
        MappedByteBuffer buf = cin.map(FileChannel.MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, size);

        cout.write(buf);
        buf.clear();
        buf = null;

        cin.close();
        cin = null;

        fin.close();
        fin = null;

        cout.close();
        cout = null;

        fout.close();
        fout = null;

        System.gc();

    } catch (Exception e){
        this.message = e.getMessage();
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, The above mentioned trick worked for me too. :) System.gc(); is what is required after all the input/ouput Stream and buffer close()/flush() to delete a file. file.delete() is very weired I must say.... Ranjit

share|improve this answer
    
That's weird. Requiring garbage collector likely means that filehandler was not closed after write but closed by finalizer. I have meet several problems like this on Windows 7 and can not track the cause of it. –  Petr Gladkikh Apr 29 '10 at 6:10
add comment

For me it does not work. I listed the directory like file.listFiles(). And afterward tried to remove some of the listed files. The files are in the Temp directory. Does not work. SO, I would say any System.gc() is not an execuse. That's just stuped. Along with another stuff written very very very bad in java for Windows. People in Oracle doesn't care I think, because the problem is not the first year here.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you are working in Eclipse IDE, that could mean that you haven't close the file in the previous launch of the application. When I had the same error message at trying to delete a file, that was the reason. It seems, Eclipse IDE doesn't close all files after termination of an application.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Before trying to delete/rename any file, you must ensure that all the readers or writers (for ex: BufferedReader/InputStreamReader/BufferedWriter) are properly closed.

When you try to read/write your data from/to a file, the file is held by the process and not released until the program execution completes. If you want to perform the delete/rename operations before the program ends, then you must use the close() method that comes with the java.io.* classes.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There was a problem once in ruby where files in windows needed an "fsync" to actually be able to turn around and re-read the file after writing it and closing it. Maybe this is a similar manifestation (and if so, I think a windows bug, really).

share|improve this answer
add comment

None of the solutions listed here worked in my situation. My solution was to use a while loop, attempting to delete the file, with a 5 second (configurable) limit for safety.

File f = new File("/path/to/file");

int limit = 20; //Only try for 5 seconds, for safety
while(!f.delete() && limit > 0){
    synchronized(this){
        try {
            this.wait(250); //Wait for 250 milliseconds
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    limit--;
}

Using the above loop worked without having to do any manual garbage collecting or setting the stream to null, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
What S.O. do you use? If you can have access to the STREAMS, close them, it will work. But if the file is "already" locked, then, you have a problem. –  marcolopes Apr 1 '13 at 1:12
    
-1 looping in your code to delete a file isn't a great idea. Why not just use the gc() option that works? –  bharal Jul 23 '13 at 9:19
    
@bharal Notice I state above that none of the other solutions (including gc()) worked in my particular case. While I agree using a while loop is not ideal, it may be an appropriate solution in certain circumstances. Adding an additional check to the code above, such as a timeout or max iterations variable, would be a good way to make the while loop safer. –  etech Jul 25 '13 at 22:25
    
@etech if your file never existed though, you've just created an infinite loop. –  bharal Jul 26 '13 at 21:33
add comment

The problem could be that the file is still seen as opened and locked by a program; or maybe it is a component from your program that it had been opened in, so you have to ensure you use the dispose() method to solve that problem. i.e. JFrame frame; .... frame.dispose();

share|improve this answer
add comment

You have to close all of the streams or use try-with-resource block

static public String head(File file) throws FileNotFoundException, UnsupportedEncodingException, IOException
{
    final String readLine;
    try (FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(file);
            InputStreamReader isr = new InputStreamReader(fis, "UTF-8");
            LineNumberReader lnr = new LineNumberReader(isr))
    {
        readLine = lnr.readLine();
    }
    return readLine;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

the answer is when you load the file, you need apply the "close" method, in any line of code, works to me

share|improve this answer
add comment

if file.delete() is sending false then in most of the cases your Bufferedreader handle will not be closed. Just close and it seems to work for me normally.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.