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I have a feed table with say fields:

  • id - unique feed id
  • created - the date the feed was created
  • table - the name of the table the rest of the feed info resides

Then I have say 2 tables: feed_image and feed_text. Now these 2 tables contain different information about a feed, different fields.

How is it possible (in MySQL) to extract the information for the feed from the appropriate table which name is specified in feed.table?

Here is how my schema looks like:

                                                 +------------------+
                                                 |    table_a       |
      +---------------------+                    |------------------|
      |   feed              |                    | id               |
      |---------------------|             +------+ feed_id          |
      |  id         <-------------------+-+      | field_in_a       |
      |  created            |           |        | ...              |
      |  table              |           |        |                  |
      |                     |           |        |                  |
      |                     |           |        |                  |
      |                     |           |        +------------------+
      +---------------------+           |
                                        |
                                        |
                                        |        +-------------------+
                                        |        |   table_b         |
                                        |        |-------------------|
                                        |        |  id               |
                                        +--------+  feed_id          |
                                                 |  field_in_b       |
                                                 |  ...              |
                                                 |                   |
                                                 |                   |
                                                 |                   |
                                                 |                   |
                                                 +-------------------+

Each feed exists either in table_a or table_b or table_c or ... (I have like 30 of them). How can I specify which table to extract the info from (each table has a different structure).

Or, if I add indexes on each table_*.feed_id and map it to feed.id, would InnoDB do some magic, so when I JOIN them all it would look in just one of them, not all 30?

My latest idea is to have just one table feed with a field feed.content where I would store a serialized PHP object of a different PHP class representing the different feed type and its individual contents.

What is the best way to go regarding performance?

P.S.: No records would need to be selected / searched / ordered by individual parameters, just by created. The idea should be able to work well with 1 000 000+ records.

UPDATE:

To clarify about the 30+ table_a/b/c..

Each feed can be of too many different types (new ones will also be added with time):

  • An image feed would have VARCHAR(255) url field
  • A text feed would have LONGTEXT text field
  • A youtube.com feed would have VARCHAR(255) title, VARCHAR(255) video_id fields
  • A *.com feed would have * x1, * x2, * x3 ... fields

Each of these feeds will be then displayed with PHP according to type:

  • An image will be displayed as na image from the given URL
  • A text will be displayed as a pure text
  • A youtube.com feed would display a video player with the given title from the given video id
  • A *.com feed would display... :)
share|improve this question
    
Can't do it with a regular query, but you could do a stored procedure which dynamically builds a query and executes that. –  Marc B Mar 28 '12 at 20:51
    
I suppose that might work, but I'm more concerned about performance.. –  Tony Bogdanov Mar 28 '12 at 20:52
    
Do you have control over the structure of the database? –  TimWickstrom.com Mar 28 '12 at 20:52
    
Yes, it is running on my localhost, so - full control. –  Tony Bogdanov Mar 28 '12 at 20:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would use a LEFT JOIN and alias my columns in the select and alias my tables in the join allowing you to return any and all information you need.

The with whatever language your pulling the results you can group and perform logic as necessary.

UPDATE:

Why do you have 30 tables exactly? Maybe one "meta" table with the feed creation date url it came from etc... and another table that contains a unique record id, feed id, content, content type.

That way you can join on one table where feed id's match as well as group by or filter by content type.

Visualization: Feed table

--------------------------------------------------------------
|  feed_id   | feed_name  |  feed_created     |   Feed_url   |
--------------------------------------------------------------
|     1      | Feed 1     |  03/28/2012       |  www.go.com  |
--------------------------------------------------------------
|     2      | Feed 1     |  03/28/2012       |  www.be.com  |
--------------------------------------------------------------
|     3      | Feed 2     |  03/28/2012       |  www.hi.com  |
--------------------------------------------------------------
|     4      | Feed 3     |  03/28/2012       |  www.ex.com  |
--------------------------------------------------------------

Visualization: Feed Resources table

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   rec_id   |  feed_id   |     content                                         |    type      |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|     1      |      1     | 'hello world!                                       |    text      |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|     2      |      3     | 'http://me.com/my-image                             |     img      |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|     3      |      2     |{\'title\':\'VIDEO\',\'url\':\'http://me.com/1.mov\'}|     vid      |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|     4      |      1     | 'Wow that was easy!'                                |     text     |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it is going to work with JOINs, but here's the catch, I could have 30 different tables with content and for each row I want to search the rest info in just one of them, not all.. –  Tony Bogdanov Mar 28 '12 at 20:58
    
so why dont you strip your rows with the feedID and place a where clause? –  TimWickstrom.com Mar 28 '12 at 21:04
    
I'm sorry, I did not understand that.. My schema is exactly as @d_inevitable draw it. –  Tony Bogdanov Mar 28 '12 at 21:06
    
see above update –  TimWickstrom.com Mar 28 '12 at 21:18
1  
Serialization, that is my favorite idea so far :) –  Tony Bogdanov Mar 28 '12 at 22:02

Can't you do something like this:

                                                     +------------------+
                                                     |    table_a       |
          +---------------------+                    |------------------|
          |   feed              |                    | id               |
          |---------------------|             +------+ feed_id          |
          |  id         <-------------------+-+      | field_in_a       |
          |  created            |           |        | ...              |
          |                     |           |        |                  |
          |                     |           |        |                  |
          |                     |           |        |                  |
          |                     |           |        +------------------+
          +---------------------+           |
                                            |
                                            |
                                            |        +-------------------+
                                            |        |   table_b         |
                                            |        |-------------------|
                                            |        |  id               |
                                            +--------+  feed_id          |
                                                     |  field_in_b       |
                                                     |  ...              |
                                                     |                   |
                                                     |                   |
                                                     |                   |
                                                     |                   |
                                                     +-------------------+

And then join the records from table_a and table_b? MySQL is pretty efficient at that.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's what I need, but the rest of 1 feed's info is located in just one table_a/b/c.. and there are like 30 of them, woudn't this join walk them all for each row? –  Tony Bogdanov Mar 28 '12 at 21:03
    
Hmm, i think you could do something with innodb tables and foreign keys. But not much a db expert. (by that i mean that you can have the above structure and innodb will add some innerworking date for this association, but that is just theory) –  d_inevitable Mar 28 '12 at 21:05
    
If I map feed_id in each table to the original feed id maybe InnoDB could do some magic.. but I don't know how I could test such a thing. –  Tony Bogdanov Mar 28 '12 at 21:08
    
Yeah, perhaps somebody can confirm that theory. I suggest you update your question accordingly. –  d_inevitable Mar 28 '12 at 21:13

You should create a normalized layout as d_inevitable suggested.

You haven't told us exactly how you're displaying this data. But you can get a list of ALL feeds with select * from feed;

Then you can get additional data for the feed by searching the other tables. For your example of URLs, if table_a = URLs and field_in_a = URL

Whichever feed you're on, you'd search for URLs with the ID for that feed. select * from URLs where feed_id = "id" This would allow each feed to have 1 to many URLs associated with it. You could do this for each type of data you'd have associated with a feed. The "feed_id" is your Foreign Key that you use to reference which feed it is.

The key is going to come down to how you're displaying this. You're going to need to loop through all the Feeds, and then build a table (?) appropriately.

If a feed has two URLs, how do you want it to look?

Should it display

-------------------------------------------------
| Feed Name  |  Feed Created     |   URL        |
-------------------------------------------------
| Feed 1     |  03/28/2012       |   www.go.com |
-------------------------------------------------
| Feed 1     |  03/28/2012       |   www.be.com |
-------------------------------------------------
| Feed 2     |  03/28/2012       |   www.hi.com |
-------------------------------------------------
| Feed 3     |  03/28/2012       |              |
-------------------------------------------------

or

-------------------------------------------------
| Feed Name  |  Feed Created     |   URL        |
-------------------------------------------------
| Feed 1     |  03/28/2012       |   www.go.com |
|            |                   |   www.be.com |
-------------------------------------------------
| Feed 2     |  03/28/2012       |   www.hi.com |
-------------------------------------------------
| Feed 3     |  03/28/2012       |              |
-------------------------------------------------

I think the data layout should be as d_inevitable suggested, and then you need to determine how you're going to display the data, and that will determine how you query it.

share|improve this answer
    
Check my original question, I've just updated it with examples of the different feeds. –  Tony Bogdanov Mar 28 '12 at 21:34
    
You don't specify which table to search in. You'd search them all. You'd do a select * from table_n where feed_id = "id" and if it returns 0 rows, you don't have any data for that feed. I wouldn't store WHICH types of data you have. Whichever type of data you're looking for, you search that date, if no rows are returned, you don't have any of that type of data for that feed. –  keyz101 Mar 28 '12 at 21:42
    
So for each feed, you'd search through all 30 tables, and if you get rows, you have data for it. If you don't, you don't have data. If you're concerned about searching through all 30 tables and getting 0 results back, you could create an additional table (feed_data) with feed_id and datatype. This table could contain each additional table you have data in. A feed_id could exist 0 to many times in this table. Then you could query feed_data where feed_id = "id" and you'd have rows for each table you'd expect to find data in. –  keyz101 Mar 28 '12 at 21:46
    
You seem very concerned about "magically" linking tables and data together. I don't understand why? –  keyz101 Mar 28 '12 at 21:47
    
I'm not concerned, it was just and idea @d_inevitable gave, I still don't uderstand your idea though. Think of it as PHP classes, there is one base parent and many children with different fields extending it. Only one child (no matter what type) could extend a single parent. I need to get all rows, but each will have individual fields according to the child that represents it. That is why I thought I might approach it through the parent rather than walking all types of children.. –  Tony Bogdanov Mar 28 '12 at 22:08

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