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I am writing a library that will provide a collection of public types to its consumers.

I want to make types from this library dependency injection friendly. This means that every class needs to have a constructor through which it is possible to specify every single dependency of the object being initialized. I also want the library to adhere to the convention over configuration principle. This means that if a consumer wants the default behavior, he may use a parameterless constructor and the object will somehow construct the dependencies for itself.

In example (C#):

public class Samurai {

    private readonly IWeapon _weapon;

    // consumers will use this constructor most of the time
    public Samurai() {
        _weapon = ??? // get an instance of the default weapon somehow
    }

    // consumers will use this constructor if they want to explicitly
    //   configure dependencies for this instance
    public Samurai(IWeapon weapon) {
        _weapon = weapon;
    }
}

My first solution would be to use the service locator pattern.

The code would look like this:

...
public Samurai() {
    _weapon = ServiceLocator.Instance.Get<IWeapon>();
}
...

I have a problem with this, though. Service locator has been flagged as an anti-pattern (link) and I completely agree with these arguments. On the other hand, Martin Fowler advocates use of the service locator pattern exactly in this situation (library projects) (link). I want to be careful and eliminate the possible necessity to rewrite the library after it shows up that service locator really was a bad idea.

So in conclusion - do you think that service locator is fine in this scenario? Should I solve my problem in a completely different way? Any thought is welcome...

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to make life easier for users who are not using a DI container, you can provide default instances via a dedicated Defaults class which has methods like this:

public virtual Samurai CreateDefaultSamurai()
{
   return new Samurai(CreateDefaultWeapon());
}

public virtual IWeapon CreateDefaultWeapon()
{
   return new Shuriken();
}

This way you don't need to pollute the classes themselves with default constructors, and your users aren't at risk of using those default constructors unintentionally.

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1  
It's important to keep a class DI friendly. +1 –  Dmitriy Startsev Mar 29 '12 at 18:05
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There is an alternative, that is injecting a specific provider, let's say a WeaponProvider in your case into your class so it can do the lookup for you:

public interface IWeaponProvider
{
    IWeapon GetWeapon();
}

public class Samurai
{
    private readonly IWeapon _weapon;

    public Samurai(IWeaponProvider provider)
    {
        _weapon = provider.GetWeapon();
    }
}

Now you can provide a local default provider for a weapon:

public class DefaultWeaponProvider : IWeaponProvider
{
    public IWeapon GetWeapon()
    {
        return new Sword();
    }
}

And since this is a local default (as opposed to one from a different assembly, so it's not a "bastard injection"), you can use it as part of your Samurai class as well:

public class Samurai
{
    private readonly IWeapon _weapon;

    public Samurai() : this(new DefaultWeaponProvider())
    {
    }

    public Samurai(IWeaponProvider provider)
    {
        _weapon = provider.GetWeapon();
    }
}
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This looks like a really elegant alternative. I would just like to ask one more additional question. –  Tomas Mar 29 '12 at 7:52
    
Now I have to hardcode the binding of IWeaponProvider to DefaultWeaponProvider in the constructor of the Samurai class. Do you see a way how this binding could be refactored out to some composition module? Like with IOC containers you have a single configuration file where you define something like this "Bind<IWeaponProvider>().To<DefaultWeaponProvider>();" (- example from Ninject). Even if there is no way to do it, I will accept your answer. Just wanted to clarify...Thanks –  Tomas Mar 29 '12 at 8:00
    
just to clarify: by "convention over configuration" you mean you still want to configure what these default values are going to be? But yes, you could implement your DefaultWeaponProvider to bind its IWeapon to anything really, i.e. based on a config file or an internal use of an IoC container - but your Samurai class will not have any of those dependencies –  BrokenGlass Mar 29 '12 at 14:01
    
I want to be able to configure the default values from one place, because I feel it is one coherent part of the application. But I want to do it inside of the library. A consumer of the library must not know about the fact, that there is some management of default values going on (map of interface-to-implementation bindings). At least he must not be required to explicitly define default values by himself. I think @wim-coenen's solution is fine because it enables me to manage default values from one place and user is not required to do configuration of any kind - if he does not want to do so. –  Tomas Apr 1 '12 at 11:14
    
I feel I should apologize, because I start to feel that this question has been vaguely specified and may not have a single correct answer. It could even become a discussion, which is not OK on SO and I know it. At this time hovewer, I think that @wim-coenen 's answer is more fitting to what I am looking for. –  Tomas Apr 1 '12 at 11:18
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I have used the following approach in my C# project. The goal was to achieve dependency injection (for unit / mock testing) whilst not crippling the implementation of the code for a "normal use case" (i.e. having a large amount of new()'s that are cascaded through the execution flow).

public sealed class QueueProcessor : IQueueProcessor
{
    private IVbfInventory vbfInventory;
    private IVbfRetryList vbfRetryList;

    public QueueProcessor(IVbfInventory vbfInventory = null, IVbfRetryList vbfRetryList = null)
    {
        this.vbfInventory = vbfInventory ?? new VbfInventory();
        this.vbfRetryList = vbfRetryList ?? new VbfRetryList();
    }
}

This allows DI but also means any consumer doesn't have to worry about what the "default instance flow" should be.

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