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I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong, but two versions of code that should give the same results are giving different results. If anyone could explain what is going on, I would really appreciate it.

The situation is as follows. I am working with arrays as 'vectors' and I have a simple function sub with two overloads to calculate the difference between the two vectors. The first basically calculates v := v - w, while the second calculates x := v - w.

// Subtract w[] from v[]
template <class T>
void sub(T *v, T *w, short m)
{
    for (short r = 0; r < m; r++)
        v[r] = v[r] - w[r];
}

// Subtract w[] from v[] and store result in x[]
template <class T>
void sub(T *v, T *w, T *x, short m)
{
    for (short r = 0; r < m; r++)
        x[r] = v[r] - w[r];
}

Now at some point I need to calculate v - w, and if it satisfies some condition, replace v by v - w. If not, v should remain unchanged. At first I had

...
// temp := v - w
sub<T>(v, w, temp, m);
if (condition on temp)
{
    // v := v - w
    sub<T>(v, w, m);
}
...

To improve efficiency, I figured it would be a waste to calculate the same thing twice, so I replaced the above by

...
// temp := v - w
sub<T>(v, w, temp, m);
if (condition on temp)
{
    // swap v and temp
    std::swap(v, temp);
}
...

The variable temp is in fact reused after, which could cause problems, but every time I first call sub<T>(v, w, temp, m); (thus erasing all content in the array) before using temp again.

Now after doing the above replacement, the results of my algorithm suddenly change. If anyone could explain why the results change and what is happening, I would be very grateful!

Thanks in advance.


Edit

A quick check shows that in both cases, in each iteration, the final value of v and the initial value of temp is the same. So the functions are doing what they are supposed to do...

The only possibility I can think of explaining the odd behavior is that for some reason, the function std::swap is using randomness, leading to different results. I'm using the same seed for each run and should get the same results each time, but if std::swap uses rand() somewhere, that would explain the different results. But I have no idea why this function would use rand().

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What is the typeof temp? Do you allocate new memory for it, or is it pointing to one of the other already existing arrays? –  Attila Mar 28 '12 at 21:03
1  
Is it me, or have you just swapped two pointers, rather than their contents? –  Robinson Mar 28 '12 at 21:03
    
Why are you your sub arguments of type T * if you work with vector<T>? What is the exact type of v, w and temp? –  Irfy Mar 28 '12 at 21:04
    
@Irfy -- my understanding is that the OP is working with arrays, not vector<>'s –  Attila Mar 28 '12 at 21:06
    
I'm working with arrays rather than vector<>'s. So initialization is done by e.g. T *temp = new T[m]. And T could be float, long double, ... –  TMM Mar 28 '12 at 21:08

2 Answers 2

If you re-calculate temp as v-w every time you are about to use temp, the value will be different, when v is unchanged and when v points to the array previously pointed to by temp.

Consider this: in the first case, your calculation is : temp=v-w every time. In the second case: temp=v-w; swap(temp, v); temp=v-w; -- the one after the swap is different from the one before as the array pointed to by v is now containing values from temp-w (using the values of pointers after the swap). That is, the second assignment is equivalent to temp=(v-w)-w; using the original arrays

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In the first case, inside the if-statement, I call the other overload of sub that calculates v := v' = v - w. So shouldn't I then also get temp := v' - w = (v - w) - w in the second iteration? –  TMM Mar 28 '12 at 21:23
    
No, unless tou recalculate temp in the first case all the time as well -- I was under the impression, you only did that in the second case –  Attila Mar 28 '12 at 21:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It turns out that at that point in the code, "the damage was already done". The swapping was done inside a function bla, which took v as an argument, as follows

void bla(..., T* v, ...)
{
    ...
    // temp := v - w
    sub<T>(v, w, temp, m);
    if (condition on temp)
    {
        // swap v and temp
        std::swap(v, w, m);
    }
    ...
}

But today I learned that this way, the function bla only makes a local copy of the pointer and works with that, instead of using the actual address with the actual pointer stored in the memory. So instead of swapping the global v with temp, I was swapping a local v with temp, and so this did not affect the global v. This also explains why I did not notice any problems locally, as inside the function, v indeed behaves the way it should. So at that point in the code, the only way to swap the values would be recomputing the expression.

A simple solution works: change the function declaration to void bla(..., T*& v, ...), so that the local copy of v used in the function bla actually corresponds to the same physical memory address as the global v. Then std::swap() works fine.

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