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I currently have a function where I'm trying to refer to the $id in the class but it doesn't work:

public function getCourseInfo($cid = $this->id, $all = false)
{

}

This is my class:

class Course
{
    protected $course;
    protected $id;

    public function __construct($cid)
    {
        $id = $cid;
        $this->course = $this->getCourseInfo($this->id);
    }
    public function getCourseInfo($cid = $this->id, $all = false)
    {

    }
}
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I assume he is trying to set a default value for the first argument with the object's id? shrugs –  Matthew Blancarte Mar 28 '12 at 21:58
1  
wouldn't you just make an overloaded function that doesn't take an id ? then defaults to the object id –  David Nguyen Mar 28 '12 at 22:07
    
If only PHP supported true overloading :-( (yes, this particular example can be approximated with optional arguments, but in general my complaint stands!) –  cmbuckley Mar 28 '12 at 22:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Everyone in this thread is giving correct answers but no one gave a full code sample hence I'll post my suggestion:

class Course
{

    /**
     * @var int
     */
    protected $_courseId;

    /**
     * @var array
     */
    protected $_course;

    /**
     * Class constructor
     *
     * @param int $courseId Course ID
     * @return Course
     */
    public function __construct($courseId)
    {
        $this->_courseId = (int) $courseId;
    }

    /**
     * Get course information
     *
     * @param bool $all ...
     * @return array
     */
    public function getCourseInfo($all = false)
    {
        if ($this->_course === null) {
            // use $this->_courseId as needed
            $this->_course = ... // populate course info
        }

        return $this->_course;
    }

}

As you'll notice I've omitted the course id parameter from getCourseInfo() simply because it's not needed if you instantiate the class with a course id.

Secondly, I don't think you should call getCourseInfo in the constructor because the information will only be needed at a later point. Also, I added "caching" to the function so that you don't fetch data twice.

Obviously there's a high chance that I could be wrong having not seen your code but I feel this is a better structure of the code.

share|improve this answer

You haven't established $this->id yet. :)

wrong

$id = $cid;

right

$this->id = $cid;

You're also missing a closing curly-brace on your class.

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Still doesn't work =( –  Johnathan Au Mar 28 '12 at 21:59
1  
Time to start busting out the good old var_dump()! Also, are you throwing any error messages? Can you show how you are creating the object? Need more info! :) –  Matthew Blancarte Mar 28 '12 at 22:01
    
It's a syntax error on '$this' on the actual function. Not when I'm calling it. –  Johnathan Au Mar 28 '12 at 22:02
    
Looks like you are missing a closing curly-brace on the class, too. Can you paste the exact error message in the comments? –  Matthew Blancarte Mar 28 '12 at 22:04
    
Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_VARIABLE –  Johnathan Au Mar 28 '12 at 22:17

You need to set the $id first in your constructor.

class Course
{
    protected $course;
    protected $id;
}

public function __construct($cid)
{
    $this->id = $cid;
    $this->course = $this->getCourseInfo($id);
}
share|improve this answer

Try this

public function getCourseInfo($cid = 'default', $all = false)
{
    $cid = $cid == 'default' ? $this->id : $cid;

}

Or you need completey change your class

class Course
{
    protected $course;
    protected $id;

    public function __construct($cid)
    {
        $this->id = $cid;
        $this->course = $this->getCourseInfo();
    }

    public function getCourseInfo($course_id = 0, $all = false)
    {
       $course_id = !$course_id ? $this->id : $course_id;
       //do Somthing with
       //return var;
    }
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No, this isn't possible, as stated on the Function arguments manual page:

The default value must be a constant expression, not (for example) a variable, a class member or a function call.

Instead you could either simply pass in null as the default and update this within your function...

class Course
{
    protected $course;
    protected $id;

public function __construct($cid)
{
    $this->id = $cid;
    $this->course = $this->getCourseInfo($this->id);
}
    function getCourseInfo($cid = null, $all = false) {
        $cid = isset($cid) ? $cid : $this->id;
        ....
    }
}
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