Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Say, I have the following struct in C#:

public struct MyStructCSharp
{
    private byte[] offsets = new byte[] { 28, 20, 27, 36 };
}

How do you do the same in C/C++?

The following doesn't seem to work:

typedef struct _MyStructCpp
{
    _MyStructCpp()
    {
        offsets[] = {28, 20, 27, 36};
    }

private:
    unsigned char offsets[];
}MyStructCpp;
share|improve this question
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot assign to an array after it has been declared. Aside from that, the syntax would be wrong. If it only ever has 4 elements then do this or just use a vector if you can.

struct MyStruct {

  MyStruct() {
    offsets[0] = 28;
    offsets[1] = 20;
    offsets[2] = 27;
    offsets[3] = 36;
  }

private:
  unsigned char offsets[4];
};

Also, do not begin your type names with an underscore. These are reserved and it could lead to nastiness.

share|improve this answer
    
This code fragment doesn't compile with MS Compiler or g++. –  merlin2011 Mar 28 '12 at 23:11
    
@merlin2011: Oops, thanks. Fixed. –  Ed S. Mar 28 '12 at 23:13
    
What if I have a 1000 numbers in the offsets definition. Does it mean I have to re-type them all? Is there an easier way? –  ahmd0 Mar 28 '12 at 23:20
1  
@ahmd0 : The easier way is to use std::array<> or boost::array<> instead of a C-array. There are many answers on SO demonstrating how this approach works. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 23:21
1  
@ahmd0: Well I answered as best I could given the information you presented. You should be using collection types (vector<T>, some of the new C++11 collections, etc) whenever and wherever you can. If you don't know up front how large the array is then you have two choices; use a vector (better) or declare offsets as unsigned char* and allocate it dynamically in your constructor as Mr. Tamer showed you in his answer. Make sure to define a destructor which deallocates the memory though. Honestly, just use a vector. –  Ed S. Mar 28 '12 at 23:24

Assuming that you have a fixed number of values, Ed S's answer is the appropriate way.

Else, You can't do the same, because you can only initialize a variable member in the initializer list, and such assignment cannot be made in the initializer list.

However, the C# version is possible thanks to using new, so maybe it is a good solution to do the same in C++, however, you will have to have the length of offsets and assign each value individually:

typedef struct _MyStructCpp
{
    _MyStructCpp(int size)
    {
        _size = size; // Say 4
        offsets = new unsigned char[size];
        offsets[0] = 28;
        // etc....
    }
private:
    int _size;
    unsigned char* offsets;
}MyStructCpp;

However, you should keep in mind that you have just allocated a dynamic memory, so you should clear it in the destructor.

share|improve this answer
    
"However, the C# version is possible thanks to using new, so maybe it is a good solution to do the same in C++" I would argue that encouraging new in C++ is never a good thing. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 23:20
    
This is about good old C++. –  ahmd0 Mar 28 '12 at 23:21
    
@ildjarn: I agree with you that it's not a good thing when the size of the array is known at compile time, if not, it's the only way I know. –  Tamer Shlash Mar 28 '12 at 23:28
    
If not, that's why there's std::vector<>. :-] –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 23:31
    
@ildjarn: As far as I know, std::vector<> use new, so are you talking about performance or about easiness? –  Tamer Shlash Mar 28 '12 at 23:35

Providing you have the support:

struct MyStructCpp
{
    private:
    unsigned char offsets[4]{28, 20, 27, 36};
};

Well, since you don't have the support:

#include <algorithm>
#include <cstddef>
struct MyStruct
{
    MyStruct()
    {
        unsigned char temp[] = {28, 20, 27, 36};
        std::copy(temp, temp + MAX, offsets);
    }
    private:
    static const std::size_t MAX = 4;
    unsigned char offsets[MAX];
};

(However, as mentioned std::vector would be better. Just showing the way if I was constrained to using a plain-old array.)

share|improve this answer
    
What kind of "support" is needed for this? –  merlin2011 Mar 28 '12 at 23:15
    
@merlin2011: In C++11 you can initialize a member array using the list initializer syntax. You previously could not. –  Ed S. Mar 28 '12 at 23:16
    
@merlin2011 : Specifically, the subsets of C++11 proposed in N2756 and N2672. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 23:18
1  
Ugh, just use a collection type. –  Ed S. Mar 28 '12 at 23:33
1  
@Jesse: In this case, yes. You have a beginner who is delving into the large and complex world that is C++. They should learn how to do things the "right" way as soon as possible. I don't think anything in his problem description requires the use of maintaining a pointer member or a raw array. –  Ed S. Mar 28 '12 at 23:42

For a fixed size array, use std::array<>:

struct MyStructCpp
{
    MyStructCpp()
      : offsets(initOffsets())
    { }

private:
    std::array<unsigned char, 4> offsets;

    static std::array<unsigned char, 4> initOffsets()
    {
        std::array<unsigned char, 4> ret = {{28, 20, 27, 36}};
        return ret;
    }
};

All non-ancient compilers will elide the apparent copy here via NRVO. For standard library implementations lacking std::array<>, use Boost.Array instead.

For a dynamically sized array, use std::vector<>. Do not use new, except as a last resort.

(Also, unrelated, but don't use the typedef struct idiom – that's a C idiom that is pointless and noisy in C++.)

share|improve this answer
char offsets[4]={28,20,27,36};
share|improve this answer
    
-1, this doesn't help with initializing a class member. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 23:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.