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Consider the following two snippets:

Exhibit A:

template<typename CalcFuncT>
int perform_calc(CalcFuncT&& calcfunc)
{
    precalc();
    int const calc = calcfunc();
    postcalc();
    return calc;
}

int main()
{
    perform_calc([]{ return 5 * foobar_x() + 3; }); // toFuture
    perform_calc([]{ return 5 * foobar_y() - 9; }); // toPast
}

Exhibit B:

template<typename CalcFuncT>
int perform_calc(CalcFuncT&& calcfunc)
{
    precalc();
    int const calc = std::forward<CalcFuncT>(calcfunc)();
    postcalc();
    return calc;
}

int main()
{
    perform_calc([]{ return 5 * foobar_x() + 3; }); // toFuture
    perform_calc([]{ return 5 * foobar_y() - 9; }); // toPast
}

Diff:

    precalc();
-   int const calc = calcfunc();
+   int const calc = std::forward<CalcFuncT>(calcfunc)();
    postcalc();

What will be the difference (if any) between the generated code of these two pieces of code?

In other words what effect is the std::forward having in the above, if any?

Note this question is not asking what std::forward does in general - only what does it do in the above context?

share|improve this question
    
Source of the snippets in question. I use std::forward<> there because the caller may not necessarily always be a lambda (it may be a functor with overloaded operator()s); if the caller is always a lambda, then there's no point in using std::forward<>. –  ildjarn Mar 28 '12 at 23:48
    
@ildjarn: How do you overload operator()s, which can only be member functions, to differentiate on an rvalue this vs a lvalue this? –  Andrew Tomazos Mar 28 '12 at 23:58
2  
It's syntax new to C++11, introduced in N2439, colloquially known as "Extending move semantics to *this". Essentially, & and && can be used as member function decorators (in addition to the usual const and volatile) to allow overloading based on the rvalue-ness or lvalue-ness of the object on which the member function is being invoked. –  ildjarn Mar 29 '12 at 0:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The forward casts the lambda object to an xvalue prior to calling the operator()() on it. The lambda object's operator()() is not qualified with or overloaded on "&&" and so the forward should have no impact.

share|improve this answer
    
It is best to avoid assumptions about functors, such as that the user will pass a lambda. Although rvalue-qualified operator() would be an oddity (implying a one-shot functor), example B is certainly more correct by allowing that case. –  Potatoswatter Mar 29 '12 at 6:40

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