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I have the following class definition:

public interface IItem{}

public class FirstObject<T, U> : IItem
{
    private readonly Expression<Func<T, U> _field;

    public FirstObject(Expression<Func<T, U> field, U value)
    {
       _field = field;
       Value = value;
    }

    public string FieldName
    {
       get
       {
          var member = _field.Body as MemberExpression;
          if(member != null)
            return member.Member.Name;

          throw new Exception("exception message");
       }
    }

    public U FieldValue { get; private set; }
}

IList<IItem> myList = new List<IItem>();

The IItem interface its only a marker to be able to put the different types of "FirstObject" into the list.

Now I need to iterate the list and get my items back. I definitely need to know both the FieldName and the FieldValue with its specific type. For this and for some other reasons I definitely need to be able to get back the objects' original type.

Thanks for your help.

UPDATE: I think there is some confusion about what I need to do, so I updated the code and improved on the explanation.

Thank you all for trying to help.

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1  
You can use reflection to get the generic type definition and perform a runtime cast... but that is a whole lot of work to end up with an object that you still know nothing about. You should probably force some sort of type hierarchy here to make sure you are able to use the types put in the list. –  M.Babcock Mar 28 '12 at 23:22
1  
You seem to have a fundamental issue with the abstractions you're using. Your IItem interface declares some number of methods and properties (which you don't show us) that all implementors must provide. You then create a list of such items. When you do that, you are making the statement "the important feature of the items in this list is that they know how to act like an IItem". If that is not the case (since you say you need additional information,) then you need a list of some other type (possibly an updated interface.) –  dlev Mar 28 '12 at 23:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to get property 'SomeProperty' form all objects, that implement IItem interface, then I think you should add that property definition to IItem (It's not just marker iterface, it states this property should exist in every object implementing it)

public interface IItem
{
    object SomeProperty { get; }
}

And implement it explicitly. This will not pollute iterface of your FirstObject objects.

public class FirstObject<T, U> : IItem
{
    public FirstObject(U value)
    {
        SomeProperty = value;
    }

    public U SomeProperty { get; private set; }

    object IItem.SomeProperty
    {
        get { return SomeProperty; }
    }
}

And now you just get that properties by casting each item to IItem interface:

foreach (var item in myList)
{                
   var x = item.SomeProperty; // Voila
}
share|improve this answer
    
but is not strongly typed, returns object, not T –  Adrian Iftode Mar 28 '12 at 23:48
1  
Same as dynamic does. Frankly speaking I don't event imagine how different strongly typed properties in one loop could be used –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 28 '12 at 23:52
1  
Btw instead of adding tags, you always can do GetType() or is –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 28 '12 at 23:53
    
yep, right maybe the return type of the property should be an interface also ha –  Adrian Iftode Mar 28 '12 at 23:55
    
@Iazyberezovsky: Depending on type T the way all fields will be processed is different and in some cases there are arithmetic calculations to be made so it would be nice that I know before hand they are numeric but I guess this kind of casting is not that bad although I would have liked to avoid it. Overall this solution seems to be my best option. Thanks for your help. –  Sergio Romero Mar 29 '12 at 14:46

If you want to get back the U from the List<IItem> then you have a couple of options

  1. Embed the U into the IItem or a new interface and make it a List<IItem<U>> instead
  2. Know the set of T and U for which you care about and attempt to cast back IItem instances to each combination
  3. Use dynamic or reflection to get the value

The dynamic solution is the most straight forward but has all of the downsides of loose typing

var values = new List<object>();
foreach (dynamic item it myList) {
  try {
    values.Add(item.SomeProperty);
  } catch { 
    // Ignore missing SomeProperty values
  }
}

My preference would be solution #2. Introduce a new interface and store that in the List<T> instead.

interface IItem<U> {
  U SomeProperty { get; }
}

public class FirstObject<T, U> : IItem, IItem<U> {
  ...
}

List<IItem<U>> myList = ...
share|improve this answer
    
Catch +1 for dynamic –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 28 '12 at 23:28
    
I don't believe the interfaces would work in this case. Can a list have one item of IItem<string> and another one of the type IItem<int>? What's the declaring type of the variable? List<IItem<?what here?>> –  Adrian Iftode Mar 28 '12 at 23:44
    
Me either don't believe in generic interface :) But changing of interface will work. See my solution below –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 28 '12 at 23:47

There are two options: add a tag or change the design.

The simplest way to "fix" your problem is to add a tag. You can add the following enum

enum FirstObjectTag { U1, U2, U3, /* ... */ }

and make myList into

IList<Tuple<IItem, FirstObjectTag>> myList = new List<Tuple<IItem, FirstObjectTag>>();

Then, whenever you add a new FirstObject to myList, you set the tag according to the type argument U. Then, whenever you pull elements out of the list, you can check the tag:

foreach (Tuple<IItem, FirstObjectTag> taggedItem in myList)
{
    switch (taggedItem.Item2)
    {
        case U1: /* taggedItem.Item1 is a FirstObject<T, U1> */
        case U2: /* taggedItem.Item1 is a FirstObject<T, U2> */
        case U3: /* taggedItem.Item1 is a FirstObject<T, U3> */
        // ...
    }
}

But on a broader note, this design seems convoluted to me. Whenever you are looking for these kinds of changes to your program, chances are there is a better way to structure the program in order to avoid the check on U. Without seeing the context of a larger program, however, it's hard to make recommendations.

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