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I'm new here same as I'm new with assembly. I hope that you can help me to start. I'm using 32bit (i686) Ubuntu to make programs in assembly, using gcc compiler.

I know that general-purpose-registers are 32bit (4 bytes) max, but what when I have to operate on 64 bit numbers? Intel's instruction says that higher bits are stored in %edx and lower in %eax Great... So how can I do something with this 2-registers number? I have to convert 64bit dec to hex, then save it to memory and show on the screen.

How to make the 64bit quadword at start of the program in .data section?

EDIT: When I defined global variable llu (long long unsigned) in C and compiled to assembly it made:

.data
a:
.long <low bits>
.long <high bits>

It is because the parameters are saved in the stack backwards or something more?

share|improve this question
1  
Convert decimal to binary? You have decimal numbers in the register somehow? – Carl Norum Mar 28 '12 at 23:32
    
gosh, thx... I had to convert dec to hex, need to edit the post. fully it goes dec -> (U2 - two's complement) -> hex, but I want to start with something easier. – Vilo Mar 28 '12 at 23:41
    
I believe edx:eax only work for idiv and imul, not for general purpose 64-bit maths. – J-16 SDiZ Mar 29 '12 at 4:17
    
What about indexing, I was thinking that I can just index every number from backwards from eax first, then edx and make binary addition (after end of eax have to set CF), but how save the result in hex to show it on the screen as hex? – Vilo Mar 29 '12 at 8:01
up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. Write a trivial C program that uses long long numbers (which have 64-bits on Linux/ix86).
  2. Compile that program into assembly with gcc -S t.c.
  3. Study the resulting assembly.
  4. Modify your program to do something more complicated, and repeat steps 2 and 3.

After several iterations, you should have a good handle on what you need to do in assembly.

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Great solution! Have to check it when I get to school. – Vilo Mar 29 '12 at 7:57

When I defined global variable llu (long long unsigned) in C and compiled to assembly it made:

.data
a:
.long <low bits>
.long <high bits>

It is because the parameters are saved in the stack backwards or something more?

share|improve this answer
    
please edit original question.. this answer seems to have question inside.. – Jayan Mar 30 '12 at 9:23

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