Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For instance:

public class Foo {
    private int bar = 42;

    Foo() {}
}

vs

public class Foo {
    private int bar;

    Foo() {
        bar = 42;
    }
}

Is there any cost/benefit between the two methods? The only way I could see it making a difference is in a scenario like this (where you're setting a value twice for the second constructor):

public class Foo {
    private int bar = 42;

    Foo() {}

    Foo(int in) {
        bar = in;
    }
}

vs (where either way you're only setting it once)

public class Foo {
    private int bar;

    Foo() {
        this(42);
    }

    Foo(int in) {
        bar = in;
    }
}

Am I missing something? Is there any inherent value in doing it one way or the other?

<EDIT> Ok, I realize these are functionaly equivalent, What's I'm trying to figure out is if there are any significant processing costs associated with one over the other. Seems like it should be negligable, at best, but I'd like confirmation of my suspicions. </EDIT>

<EDIT2> I also realize that manually setting them eliminates the possibility of initilization logic. That's why I chose such simple examples. I edited the question text to reflect that what I'm interested in is efficiency. </EDIT2>

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

The two methods are equivalent. With that said, I'll add two things:

  1. This tends to be more of an issue with final variables because obviously you can only set them once as you do in your third snippet; and
  2. Try to chain your constructors together.

On (2) I think this is a better version:

public class Foo {
    private int bar;

    Foo() {
        this(42);
    }

    Foo(int in) {
        bar = in;
    }
}

By chaining constructors you can get default defaults in a nice DRY (don't repeat yourself) kind of way, particularly when dealing with several parameters that could have default arguments, various allowed types of parameters and non-trivial initialization. Ideally only one or maybe two of your constructors should have significant logic in them. The rest should just chain to another constructor.

If you want to make the class immutable (as Josh Bloch says, favour immutability) then:

public class Foo {
    private final int bar;

    Foo() {
        this(42);
    }

    Foo(int in) {
        bar = in;
    }
}

Lastly it might be worth making 42 a static final constant (private or public, as appropriate).

share|improve this answer
    
very well said! –  neesh Jun 13 '09 at 23:27
    
I realize they're functionally identical... I guess what I was trying to figure out was whether there was any benefit to one over the other. I'm programming for mobile phones and trying to be as "efficient" as possible, within reason. –  fiXedd Jun 13 '09 at 23:34
    
Thanks for the tip, I added the chaining to the example so people would focus more on the intent of the question than specific implementation details. –  fiXedd Jun 13 '09 at 23:48

There are advantages to initializing variables in the constructor. Sometimes initialization requires logic and that cannot be done if the variable's value is set as in your first example. The points that others have made about maintainability are valid however.

But Java provides us with the initializer block. Initializer blocks are copied into every constructor by the compiler. So if you are worried about the constructors being inconsistent then you can do this:

 public class Foo {
   private int bar;

   //initializer block
   {
      //initializing code here
   }

   Foo() {

   }
 }

The second option that you have is to chain the constructors as described by cletus.

share|improve this answer

personally I prefer the first way as it is clearer what the value of the var is initially.

share|improve this answer
    
I tend to agree, but I was trying to establish whether one way was "better" than the other (more efficient, etc). –  fiXedd Jun 13 '09 at 23:32
    
sorry should have stated I agreed with the original comment in that there was no performance difference. It’s a matter of style, not performance. –  objects Jun 15 '09 at 9:11

The main risk of setting fields to default values in a constructor is when people start adding multiple constructors and don't keep the fields consistent.

My own (unscientific) experience with legacy Java code is that if there are more than two constructors and more than two fields, 80% of the time something would not be correctly initialized.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.