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I try to launch the command prompt hidden when querying the wmic qfe list that contains my installed KB articles.

I launch the command "wmic qfe list full" from inside my command prompt and this gets me the list.

When I do this from inside my C# app, in order to let my process execution from cmd.Exe stop after the command has completed, i use the /c switch as an argument. However, since I added this switch, I can no longer have my cmd.exe launching hidden.

It pops up and executes the code and as it should do, it closes itself after execution of the command and it pipes the information to my app.

But I cannot hide it. Any advise on hiding it with the /c switch in the arguments or having it stop after the command line has been executed without the /c switch in it.

Here is my code:

private void btn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string fileName = @"cmd.exe";

    Process p = new Process();

    ProcessStartInfo ps = new ProcessStartInfo();
    ps.Arguments = " /c wmic qfe list full";
    ps.FileName = fileName;
    ps.UseShellExecute = false;
    ps.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
    ps.RedirectStandardInput = true;
    ps.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
    ps.RedirectStandardError = true;

    p.StartInfo = ps;
    p.Start();

    StreamReader srrOutput = p.StandardOutput;

    this.textBox1.Text = srrOutput.ReadToEnd();

}

Found it, apparently adding the /C switch also requires me to add:

    ps.CreateNoWindow = true;

Now it works just fine, Should've googled somewhat longer..

share|improve this question
2  
Why not launch wmic directly from the C# program, rather than instruct cmd.exe to launch wmic for you? – Adam Mihalcin Mar 28 '12 at 23:58
3  
If you've solved your problem, please be sure to write it as an answer so future readers can learn from your experience. – M.Babcock Mar 29 '12 at 0:31
1  
@AdamMihalcin - I used it via cmd.exe because "wmic.exe qfe list full" and "cmd.exe wmic qfe list full" both work, however, for example "wmic.exe qfe | find "KB982018"" Does not work but it does work inside command prompt, considering I need to use both commands inside my app I chose to make it generic by using the same process twice but changing the arguments. Any idea why the second searchstring only works in the command prompt? – XikiryoX Mar 29 '12 at 1:35
1  
@M.Babcock - I wanted to do so, however, because I only am Lvl 75, I had to wait 8h before responding to my own post :-) (have to be lvl100 to do that quicker) – XikiryoX Mar 29 '12 at 1:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I had the same issue as well when trying to use /c in cmd. You have to use:

    ps.CreateNoWindow = true; 

Without the /c command, the

    ps.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;  

Same issue with the /k switch.

Regards

share|improve this answer

If wmic is an application, you don't have to start a cmd.exe process. But start wmic process instead.

Regards

share|improve this answer
1  
I will add the same comment as I added with Andrew and Adam. You are absolutely correct however I did experience something weird.. True story, that indeed works with the qfe list full command, weird though is that wmic.exe qfe list full and cmd.exe wmic qfe list full both work, however, for example wmic.exe qfe | find "KB982018" Does not work but it does work inside command prompt. That is the reason why I used cmd. Any idea why? Thanks for the answer – XikiryoX Mar 29 '12 at 1:38
1  
by using | you pipe the two processes; Which means you transfert wmic.exe output to the find command. Piping using this syntaxe can be done in a command prompt, that's why it works. However you can simulate a pipe in chsarp without invoking cmd.exe. Simply by retreiving wmic.exe output and giving it as one of the argument of the find process you'll start. – grifos Mar 29 '12 at 2:10

Another option is just to call wmic.exe directly:

ps.Filename = "wmic.exe";
ps.Arguments = "qfe list full";
share|improve this answer
1  
True story, that indeed works with the qfe list full command, weird though is that wmic.exe qfe list full and cmd.exe wmic qfe list full both work, however, for example wmic.exe qfe | find "KB982018" Does not work but it does work inside command prompt. That is the reason why I used cmd. Any idea why? Thanks for the answer – XikiryoX Mar 29 '12 at 1:30

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