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I have JSON maps like this:

"things": {"foo": {"name": "foo", ...}, "bar": {"name": "bar", ...}}

I want to deserialize them as if they were arrays:

"things": [{"name": "foo", ...}, {"name": "bar", ...}]

(to match XML/JAXB deserialization behavior):

<things><thing name="foo">...</thing><thing name="bar">...</thing></things>

into a collection such as this:

@XmlElementWrapper
@XmlElement(name = "thing")
@JsonDeserialize(using = MapToCollectionDeserializer.class)
Collection<Thing> things;

Note that I have collections with various element types -- not just Thing -- so I need a generic mechanism.

However, when writing a custom deserializer, what's the right way to access the type information of the context?

public class MapToCollectionDeserializer extends StdDeserializer<Object>
{
    @Override
    public Object deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt)
        throws IOException, JsonProcessingException
    {
        Preconditions.checkState(jp.getCurrentToken() == JsonToken.START_OBJECT);
        final LinkedList<Object> result = new LinkedList<>();
        JsonToken tok;
        while ((tok = jp.nextToken()) != JsonToken.END_OBJECT)
        {
            Preconditions.checkState(tok == JsonToken.FIELD_NAME);
            // How to get the collection element type for deserialization?
            result.add(...);
        }
        return result;
    }
}

My approach so far is using ContextualDeserializer, which can provide a BeanProperty (which contains type information) to the deserializer. However, a JsonDeserializer must still have a no-arg constructor, so I end up constructing a broken object at first:

public class MapToCollectionDeserializer extends StdDeserializer<Object>
    implements ContextualDeserializer<Object>
{
    private final BeanProperty property;

    public MapToCollectionDeserializer()
    {
        super(Collection.class);
        property = null; // YUCK: BROKEN!!!
    }

    private MapToCollectionDeserializer(BeanProperty property)
    {
        super(property.getType());
        this.property = property;
    }

    @Override
    public JsonDeserializer<Object> createContextual(DeserializationConfig config,
        BeanProperty property) throws JsonMappingException
    {
        return new MapToCollectionDeserializer(property);
    }

    @Override
    public Object deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt) throws IOException,
        JsonProcessingException
    {
        Preconditions.checkState(jp.getCurrentToken() == JsonToken.START_OBJECT);
        final JavaType elementType = property.getType().containedType(0);
        final LinkedList<Object> result = new LinkedList<>();
        JsonToken tok;
        while ((tok = jp.nextToken()) != JsonToken.END_OBJECT)
        {
            Preconditions.checkState(tok == JsonToken.FIELD_NAME);
            jp.nextToken();
            final JsonDeserializer<Object> valueDeser = ctxt.getDeserializerProvider()
                .findValueDeserializer(ctxt.getConfig(), elementType, property);
            result.add(valueDeser.deserialize(jp, ctxt));
        }
        return result;
    }
}

Is there a better/simpler way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
I know this is a few months old at this point, but did you ever find a cleaner approach to this? I find myself needing to do something similar and haven't found anything better. –  sfitts Sep 13 '12 at 19:53
    
I ended up creating my own serialization framework using Gson. Jackson was just too convoluted. –  Trevor Robinson Sep 24 '12 at 0:25

1 Answer 1

It looks like you stopped using Jackson, but for anyone with a similar problem, you can turn on DeserializationFeature.ACCEPT_SINGLE_VALUE_AS_ARRAY. With that setting enabled, when Jackson finds an object in the JSON but is supposed to deserialize to a collection, it will create a collection and put the object into the collection which seems like what you want here.

share|improve this answer
    
Good to know, but I don't think it addresses this case. In the example above, that sounds like it would give me a single object in the collection with "foo" and "bar" properties, which isn't what I want. I essentially want to ignore all the property names (since they contain redundant information) and treat their values as an array. –  Trevor Robinson Jan 14 '13 at 17:45

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