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I have the following data and nested for loop:

x <- c(12, 27, 21, 16, 12, 21, 18, 16, 20, 23, 21, 10, 15, 26, 21, 22, 22, 19, 26, 26)
y <- c(8, 10,  7,  7,  9,  5,  7,  7, 10,  4, 10,  3,  9,  6,  4,  2,  4,  2,  3,  6)

a <- c(20,25) 
a.sub <- c()
df <- c()
for(j in 1:length(a)){
    a.sub <- which(x >= a[j])   
    for(i in 1:length(a.sub)){
        df[i] <- y[a.sub[i]]    
    }
    print(df)
}

I'd like the loop to return values for df as:

[1] 10  6  3  6  4 10  6  4  2  4  3  6
[1] 10  6  3  6

As I have it, however, the loop returns the same values twice of df for a <- 20 but not a <- 25:

[1] 10  7  5 10  4 10  6  4  2  4  3  6
[1] 10  6  3  6  4 10  6  4  2  4  3  6
share|improve this question
    
error in which(p >= a[j]): object 'p' not found –  Chase Mar 29 '12 at 2:38
2  
and maybe explain what it is you are trying to do in english, nested loops in R can often be rewritten using other, more efficient constructs –  Chase Mar 29 '12 at 2:39
    
Thanks, fixed the above error. –  srmulcahy Mar 29 '12 at 2:41
    
is 'dur' defined? –  Mark Miller Mar 29 '12 at 2:43
    
John's answer below works well. I'm looking to form df from elements of y that have corresponding x values less than a. –  srmulcahy Mar 29 '12 at 3:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
for(i in 1:length(a.sub)){
    df[i] <- y[a.sub[i]]    
}

can become

df <- y[a.sub]    

neither a.sub nor df need to be predefined then and thus...

x <- c(12, 27, 21, 16, 12, 21, 18, 16, 20, 23, 21, 10, 15, 26, 21, 22, 22, 19, 26, 26)
y <- c(8, 10,  7,  7,  9,  5,  7,  7, 10,  4, 10,  3,  9,  6,  4,  2,  4,  2,  3,  6)

a <- c(20,25) 
for(j in 1:length(a)){
    a.sub <- which(x >= a[j])   
    df <- y[a.sub]    
    print(df)
}

It could be made shorter. df is unnecessary if you're just printing the subset of y anyway. Just print it directly. And the selector is so short it wouldn't make a single line confusing. Furthermore, why use length of a and index.. loop through a directly. So, it could be...

a <- c(20,25) 
for(ax in a){
    print( y[ which(x >= ax) ] )
}
share|improve this answer
    
But I do not think that returns: [1] 10 6 3 6 4 10 6 4 2 4 3 6 –  Mark Miller Mar 29 '12 at 3:12
    
I agree.. but it simplifies his code and replicates what that actually did... maybe he can make it do what the heck he was looking for now that it's easier. :) –  John Mar 29 '12 at 3:15

Not sure if this is a simplified version of a more complex problem, but I'd probably solve this using some direct indexing and an apply function. Something like this:

z <- cbind(x,y)
sapply(c(20,25), function(x) z[z[, 1] >= x, 2])
[[1]]
 [1] 10  7  5 10  4 10  6  4  2  4  3  6

[[2]]
[1] 10  6  3  6
share|improve this answer
    
Somehow the original poster wants: 10 6 3 6 4 10 6 4 2 4 3 6 the first time through the second loop. –  Mark Miller Mar 29 '12 at 3:07
    
why bother with cbind? They can just be treated as separate vectors. –  John Mar 29 '12 at 3:12
    
@John - good point, habit of creature I suppose? I have this (irrational) fear of the order of objects getting out of whack if they're completely separate entities, or getting corrupted by some other command in my workspace...I would also probably run rm(x,y) after creating z so as to not confuse myself too...but it's probably overkill and not necessary as you point out. –  Chase Mar 29 '12 at 12:29

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