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I have the following data.frames:

a <- data.frame(id = 1:3, v1 = c('a', NA, NA), v2 = c(NA, 'b', 'c'))
b <- data.frame(id = 1:3, v1 = c(NA, 'B', 'C'), v2 = c("A", NA, NA))
> a
  id   v1   v2
1  1    a <NA>
2  2 <NA>    b
3  3 <NA>    c
> b
  id   v1   v2
1  1 <NA>    A
2  2    B <NA>
3  3    C <NA>

note: There are no ids for which v1 or v2 are defined in both tables; there is only a single unique non-NA value in each column for each id value

I would like to merge these data frames on matching values of "id':

ab <- merge(a, b, by = "id")

but I would also like to combine the two columns v1 and v2, so that the data.frame ab will look like this:

ab <- data.frame(id = 1:3, v1 = c("a", "B", "C"), v2 = c("A", "b", "c"))

> ab
  id v1 v2
1  1  a  A
2  2  B  b
3  3  C  c

instead, I get this:

> merge(a, b, by = "id")
  id v1.x v2.x v1.y v2.y
1  1    a <NA> <NA>    A
2  2 <NA>    b    B <NA>
3  3 <NA>    c    C <NA>

it would be helpful to have examples using both data.frame and data.table, so here are the data.table versions of above:

A <- data.table(a, key = 'id')
B <- data.table(b, key = 'id')
A[B]
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The type of merge you specify probably won't be possible using merge (with data frames), although saying that usually invites being proved wrong.

You also omit some details: will there always be a single unique non-NA value in each column for each id value? If so, this will work:

ab <- rbind(a,b)
> colFun <- function(x){x[which(!is.na(x))]}
> ddply(ab,.(id),function(x){colwise(colFun)(x)})
  id v1 v2
1  1  a  A
2  2  B  b
3  3  C  c

A similar strategy should work with data.tables as well:

abDT <- data.table(ab,key = "id")
> abDT[,list(colFun(v1),colFun(v2)),by = id]
     id V1 V2
[1,]  1  a  A
[2,]  2  B  b
[3,]  3  C  c
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The answer is "yes", there will always be "a single unique non-NA value"; this is more clear way to state what I tried to convey in the note under the first code block: "There are no ids for which v1 or v2 are defined in both tables" –  David Mar 29 '12 at 3:29
    
what if the id's are different. Will this still work? –  Tyler Rinker Mar 29 '12 at 3:36
    
+1 for colwise. I wasn't aware of that funciton, but it looks nifty. –  Brandon Bertelsen Mar 29 '12 at 3:39
    
@TylerRinker I'm not sure I get what you mean by different ids. –  joran Mar 29 '12 at 3:41
    
Also, @MatthewDowle would surely be able to suggest a slicker way to apply colFun to each column without listing them explicitly. –  joran Mar 29 '12 at 3:42
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If your data is as simple as it is above joran's answer is likely the simplest way. Here's may approach in base:

a <- data.frame(id = 1:3, v1 = c('a', NA, NA), v2 = c(NA, 'b', 'c'))
b <- data.frame(id = 1:3, v1 = c(NA, 'B', 'C'), v2 = c("A", NA, NA))

decider <- function(x, y) factor(ifelse(is.na(x), as.character(y), as.character(x)))
data.frame(mapply(a, b, FUN = decider))

If your data has different id's (some overlap and some do not, then here's a different approach:

a <- data.frame(id = c(1,2,4,5), v1 = c('a', NA, "q", NA), v2 = c(NA, 'b', 'c', "e"))
b <- data.frame(id = 1:4, v1 = c(NA, "A", "C", 'B'), v2 = c("A", NA, "D", NA))

decider <- function(x, y) factor(ifelse(is.na(x), as.character(y), as.character(x)))

DF <- data.frame(mapply(a, b, FUN = decider))
DF2 <- rbind(b[!b$id %in% DF$id , ], DF)
DF2 <- DF2[order(DF2$id), ]
rownames(DF2) <- 1:nrow(DF2)
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1  
+1 Ah, I see what you mean. Some ids appearing in one df but not the other. I suspect my general strategy would still work in that case, assuming the OP's specification still holds, which would mean that that isolated id wouldn't have any NA values in it. –  joran Mar 29 '12 at 3:45
    
+1 for underused mapply. –  Roman Luštrik Mar 29 '12 at 7:34
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