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I have two classes that represent two different database entities. Their relationship is 1:m in db and it is represented in class structures something like this:

public class Company {

    private List<Employee> employees;

    public List<Employee> getEmployees() {
        return employees;
    }

    public void setEmployees(List<Employee> employees) {
        this.employees = employees;
    }

}

public class Employee {

    private Company company;

    public Company getCompany() {
        return company;
    }

    public void setCompany(Company company) {
        this.company = company;
    }

}

Now I want to override equals/hashCode on these classes. Eclipse generates the following code for me:

public class Company {

    private List<Employee> employees;

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + ((employees == null) ? 0 : employees.hashCode());
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
            return false;
        Company other = (Company) obj;
        if (employees == null) {
            if (other.employees != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!employees.equals(other.employees))
            return false;
        return true;
    }

}

public class Employee {

    private Company company;

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + ((company == null) ? 0 : company.hashCode());
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
            return false;
        Employee other = (Employee) obj;
        if (company == null) {
            if (other.company != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!company.equals(other.company))
            return false;
        return true;
    }

}

If I run the following test:

public class EqualsTest {

    @Test
    public void testEquals() {

        Company company1 = new Company();
        Employee employee1 = new Employee();

        employee1.setCompany(company1);
        company1.setEmployees(Arrays.asList(employee1));

        Company company2 = new Company();
        Employee employee2 = new Employee();

        employee2.setCompany(company2);
        company2.setEmployees(Arrays.asList(employee2));

        assertThat(company1, is(company2));
    }

}

I expect it to pass because both company1 and company2 have equal lists of employees, but it fails with StackOverflowError:

java.lang.StackOverflowError
    at java.util.AbstractList$Itr.<init>(AbstractList.java:318)
    at java.util.AbstractList$Itr.<init>(AbstractList.java:318)
    at java.util.AbstractList$ListItr.<init>(AbstractList.java:377)
    at java.util.AbstractList.listIterator(AbstractList.java:315)
    at java.util.AbstractList.listIterator(AbstractList.java:284)
    at java.util.AbstractList.equals(AbstractList.java:502)
    at com.test.Company.equals(Company.java:37)
    at com.test.Employee.equals(Employee.java:35)
    at java.util.AbstractList.equals(AbstractList.java:507)
    at com.test.Company.equals(Company.java:37)
    at com.test.Employee.equals(Employee.java:35)
    at java.util.AbstractList.equals(AbstractList.java:507)
    at com.test.Company.equals(Company.java:37)
    at com.test.Employee.equals(Employee.java:35)
        ...

I understand that the reason for this failure is cross reference in classes and thus equals/hashCode methods. But how should I implement equals/hashCode to avoid infinitive recursion?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As it is now, the identity of a company is defined solely by its employees. Likewise, the identity of an employee is defined solely by its company. Do you see how that leads to a mutual logical dependency?

You need to break that logical dependency in your code. How would you logically uniquely identify a company and an employee? Typically you'd do this with some sort of meaningful unique identifier: a name (string), a number (int/long), or some similar combination of primitive fields.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, MДΓΓ БДLL. There are other fields on those classes (simle strings like company name, employee name, etc) and they are included in the equals/hashCode methods. I just omitted them in the question as they don't cause any issues, cross reference that's what's causing problems. –  parxier Mar 29 '12 at 3:42
    
In that case it sounds like you should omit the company's employees from the Company#hashCode() and Company#equals() methods. An employee can be defined by the company she works for, but a company is not (uniquely, anyway) defined by its employees. –  Matt Ball Mar 29 '12 at 3:43
1  
As I commented on schtever answer that will cause two companies with the same name but different employees to be equal, that is not right. –  parxier Mar 29 '12 at 3:45
    
Then an employee should not be uniquely defined by the company they work for! Like I said, you've got to choose where to break the logical loop. It is up to you to decide what uniquely defines your entities. You could introduce a separate/independent identifier field for a company if the name is not sufficient to uniquely specify a company. You can't have things both ways: you need to choose to start somewhere. –  Matt Ball Mar 29 '12 at 3:46
    
Thanks, MДΓΓ БДLL. I didn't think about single (or composite) identifier that would signal equality of two objects of the same type. For some reason I thought I need to use all the fields on the class. Maybe auto-generation of these methods by Eclipse needs to be more flexible. Thanks for your comments. –  parxier Mar 29 '12 at 22:20

Imho there are 2 versions available. I assume company should be the "leading" class, storing the employees.

  1. version: In the employee equals, use the "==" to check for object equality on company (not very nice)
  2. version: assign your company a unique ID and compare that only that company ID in employee equals

hth

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, phloc. I'll go for option #2. –  parxier Mar 29 '12 at 22:23

Do not compare the list of employees within the Company.equals method. Are there other attributes of Company that are meaningful and could be used to perform the comparison within equals, like a name? Or Stock Symbol?

share|improve this answer
    
There are other simple fields on those classes. Your suggestion will cause two companies with the same name but different employees to be equal, that is not right. –  parxier Mar 29 '12 at 3:44
    
Could you elaborate on why that is not right? Will you have a situation where two companies with the same name will in fact be different entities? –  schtever Mar 29 '12 at 3:48
    
Thanks, schtever. As I commented in the accepted answer I didn't think about single (or composite) identifier that would signal equality of two objects of the same type. For some reason I thought I need to use all the fields on the class for that. –  parxier Mar 29 '12 at 22:24

You have inadvertently set up a recursive dependency between Company and Employee. The Company#hashCode() method needs to compute the individual hashcodes of every Employee, and the Employee#hashCode() method depends on the Company's hashcode, leading to an infinite recursion.

A company object's hashcode should not depend on the employees in it. The hash code is in some sense the "identity" of the object, which shouldn't change when a new employee is added to it. Same for Employee. The Employee's identity shouldn't change just because he/she moves to a different company.

You'll have to redefine those methods in terms of some meaningful identity attribute. Your code doesn't show it, but both Company and Employee must have some other member variables, such as a name. Base the hashCode and equals implementations on that attribute.

share|improve this answer
    
I want two companies with the same lists of employees to be considered equal. How is that possible with comparing just identity attributes. –  parxier Mar 29 '12 at 3:47
    
Don't use equals, write a separate Comparator for that purpose. –  Jim Garrison Mar 29 '12 at 3:48

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