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I have a resource in my project that collects some information from a user. Basically it's a form that they fill out before they can access another area of the site. It then sets a cookie for a week, but if they come back it will look up their previous entry and keep their preferences tied to them (and will update any details as long as the email address matches).

Currently I have a Applicants controller that looks like this:

class ApplicantsController < ApplicationController

  ...

  def create
    @applicant = Applicant.find_or_initialize_by_email(params[:applicant])
    if @applicant.new_record? ? @applicant.save : @applicant.update_attributes(params[:applicant])
      set_cookie_and_redirect
    else
      render 'new'
    end
  end

  def update
    if @applicant.update_attributes(params[:applicant])
      set_cookie_and_redirect
    else
      render 'new'
    end
  end

end

The set_cookie_and_redirect is a private method that just sets some cookies and redirects the user to a page. The code works, but it just feels dirty. It's essentially updating a record within the create method under the condition that it's not a new record. I'm also forced to have an update method in case an existing record comes back with a validation error--the form helper will then switch the form over to sending to the update method.

So to my point... is there a more appropriate way to push the update_attributes call in the create method to the update method? Or better put, is there a better way to respect the RESTful methods in isolating the create and update functionality?

UPDATE: I wanted to be a little more specific too. If the user has filled this form out before it will set a cookie so they don't have to fill it out again for seven days. However after seven days the cookie is expired and they see the form again. The controller doesn't know if the user is new or existing until they add user input into the form which is then compared based on the email address.

Thanks in advance! I definitely look forward to anyone's thoughts on this.

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1 Answer 1

The create method should only create, and the update method should only update. Let Rails decide which is going to happen based on what is inside of @applicant when the form is rendered - It essentially does what you're doing: Checks if the record is new or not, and sends it to update/create accordingly. Example:

def applicant
  @applicant = Applicant.find_or_initialize_by_email(cookies[:email])
  # renders applicant.html.erb form
end

<%= form_for @applicant do |f| %>
  # ... fields ...
<% end %>

def create
  @applicant = Applicant.new(params[:applicant])
  @applicant.save
  # .. etc.
end

def update
  @applicant = Applicant.find_by_email(cookies[:email])
  @applicant.update_attributes(params[:applicant])
  # ... etc.
end

Rails will send the request to the correct action based on the new_record? status of the Applicant object.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey bricker, I think I see what you've done here but I'm not sure when the applicant method is being executed. Would that just be the new method? The problem is the controller doesn't know if it's a new or existing applicant until something has been added into the form. That information isn't coming from a cookie, it's coming from user input. –  Tim K. Mar 29 '12 at 11:57
    
Bricker, I was thinking... perhaps do you know a way to forward to a different action in a controller? I could always create a custom action, let's call it "check" and the form posts to "check". The check method can make that determination if it is new or not (again remember I have to check the database so something has to make the determination because I'm passing the check on user input, form_for won't know these details). Then would it be possible to get the check method to forward to create or update respectfully? –  Tim K. Apr 7 '12 at 2:27

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