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I have an application that has a status table see Database best practices - Status for an example

I want to be able to show a history of the status changes. There are 2 ways I can see for implementing it using mvc3 and the entity model like this - http://www.asp.net/mvc/tutorials/getting-started-with-ef-using-mvc/creating-an-entity-framework-data-model-for-an-asp-net-mvc-application

I can always just have a StatusID property on whatever object needs to link to the status table e.g.

Job
ID
Name
StatusID

Status
ID Status

Or, I could have a StatusHistory table and make the StatusID property a function that return a Status object e.g.

Job
ID
Name

Status
ID Status

StatusHistory
ID
JobID
StatusID
Date

and on the Job model class (Job.cs) have a function called Status which return 1 Status Object by querying the StatusHistory table for the latest status object that relates to the Job.

Has anyone done anything similar to this?

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Going to have to disagree that keeping deprecated data is "best practice". Sure, sometimes things needs to have a status but that doesn't mean they should be kept in the main database as it will get cluttered and queries will get slow. –  Travis J Mar 29 '12 at 5:06
    
One table with an efficient index I wouldn't considered slow or cluttered. We have 20+million row tables with near instant lookups. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Mar 29 '12 at 8:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

you may have

StatusHistory

  • ID
  • JobID
  • StatusID
  • Date

while Job contain current StatusID.

Job

  • ID
  • StatusID (latest)

this way you "cache" the Job's latest Status instead of searching..

StatusHistories.OrderDescending(s => s.Date).FirstOrDefault(); //unnecessary task

every time you need it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ai.farfa. The status also has an optional comment with it but it would probably be setting that up in the same way in order to have best performance. –  the-a-train Mar 29 '12 at 8:03

What you are looking for is aTemporal Database. Pretty much, instead of keeping a ton of status codes you break the logic down into a pipeline of dates. For example, a date for job began, a date for job finished. Finished jobs should be migrated at some point to an archive to keep your database clean.

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Thanks for your answer Travis, my only feedback as per your other comment is that closed doesn't necessarily mean "not in use". Depending on the system it may in fact be used for reference, much like this site - what if they archived all the answered questions. –  the-a-train Mar 29 '12 at 8:01
    
@smartfaceweb - I agree that there is a certain level of caution that needs to be used with archiving. I don't think your example is really the same though because I was talking about the difference between moving data versus "soft-deleting" or hiding deprecated data which is what some people use as a crutch. This can be common when there is data which is flagged as "closed", "isActive", "isDeleted", etc. I agree that relevant data most definitely must remain available for reference. –  Travis J Mar 29 '12 at 8:56

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