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Why is it that I can't have 008 or 009 be keys for a Python dict, but 001-007 are fine? Example:

some_dict = {
    001: "spam",
    002: "eggs",
    003: "foo",
    004: "bar",
    008: "anything", # Throws a SyntaxError
    009: "nothing"   # Throws a SyntaxError
    }

Update: Problem solved. I wasn't aware that starting a literal with a zero made it octal. That seems really odd. Why zero?

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1  
Why in Python? Historical precendent (C did it). I have no idea why it was in C, because I agree that it's pretty silly. –  Jacob Jun 14 '09 at 2:23
2  
yeah, we're stuck with it. If you have to have the zeros, make them strings instead. The dictionary will work fine. –  Jay Atkinson Jun 14 '09 at 2:29
10  
As bad as using a leading zero to indicate an octal number is, JavaScript has the insane behavior of automatically ignoring the fact that a number should be octal if it has any non-octal digits. So in JavaScript, 077 represents 63 decimal while 078 represents 78 decimal. The worst of both worlds.. –  Michael Burr Jun 14 '09 at 2:42
1  
Robert: You are asking why was it changed almost 40 years ago to zero. The real question is why do newer languages keep doing it? –  jmucchiello Jun 14 '09 at 2:59
6  
007 killed them –  DShook Jun 19 '09 at 2:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 27 down vote accepted

In python and some other languages, if you start a number with a 0, the number is interpreted as being in octal (base 8), where only 0-7 are valid digits. You'll have to change your code to this:

some_dict = { 
    1: "spam",
    2: "eggs",
    3: "foo",
    4: "bar",
    8: "anything",
    9: "nothing" }

Or if the leading zeros are really important, use strings for the keys.

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4  
I really, really wish that K&R hadn't come up with that convention for octal (I assume it was them)... –  Michael Burr Jun 14 '09 at 2:29
    
@Michael - it looks like K&R may have chosen '0' but the prefix form for octal seems to predate them. I traced it back to the original BCPL definition. They probably chose '0' as a nicety for the lexer. –  D.Shawley Jun 15 '09 at 4:33
    
It doesn't bother me all that much that it's a C convention. What bothers me is that other C-like languages (not counting those designed to be directly compatible) copied it. I hadn't realized the convention existed in Python. Ick. –  David Thornley Jun 19 '09 at 16:40

Python takes 008 and 009 as octal numbers, therefore...invalid.

You can only go up to 007, then the next number would be 010 (8) then 011 (9). Try it in a Python interpreter, and you'll see what I mean.

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In Python (and many other languages), starting a number with a leading "0" indicates an octal number (base 8). Using this leading-zero notation is called an octal literal. Octal numbers go 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, etc. So 08 (in octal) is invalid.

If you remove the leading zeros, your code will be fine:

some_dict = 
{ 
    1: "spam",
    2: "eggs",
    3: "foo",
    4: "bar",
    8: "anything",
    9: "nothing" 
}
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@DoxaLogos is right. It's not that they're invalid keys - they're invalid literals. If you tried to use them in any other context, you'd get the same error.

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That is because, when you start a number with a 0, it is interpreted as an octal number. Since 008 and 009 are not octal numbers, it fails.

A 0 precedes an octal number so that you do not have to write (127)₈. From the Wikipedia page: "Sometimes octal numbers are represented by preceding a value with a 0 (e.g. in Python 2.x or JavaScript 1.x - although it is now deprecated in both)."

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