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I need to implement 256 bit AES encryption, but all the examples I have found online use a "KeyGenerator" to generate a 256 bit key, but I would like to use my own passkey. How can I create my own key? I have tried padding it out to 256 bits, but then I get an error saying that the key is too long. I do have the unlimited jurisdiction patch installed, so thats not the problem :)

Ie. The KeyGenerator looks like this ...

// Get the KeyGenerator
KeyGenerator kgen = KeyGenerator.getInstance("AES");
kgen.init(128); // 192 and 256 bits may not be available

// Generate the secret key specs.
SecretKey skey = kgen.generateKey();
byte[] raw = skey.getEncoded();

Code taken from here

EDIT

I was actually padding the password out to 256 bytes, not bits, which is too long. The following is some code I am using now that I have some more experience with this.

byte[] key = null; // TODO
byte[] input = null; // TODO
byte[] output = null;
SecretKeySpec keySpec = null;
keySpec = new SecretKeySpec(key, "AES");
Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS7Padding");
cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, keySpec);
output = cipher.doFinal(input)

The "TODO" bits you need to do yourself :-)

share|improve this question
    
Could you clarify: does calling kgen.init(256) work? –  Mitch Wheat Jun 14 '09 at 2:45
1  
Yes, but this automatically generates a key ... but since I want to encrypt data between two places, I need to know the key beforehand, so I need to specify one instead of "generate" one. I can specify a 16bit one which works for 128bit encryption which works. I have tried a 32bit one for 256bit encryption, but it did not work as expected. –  Nippysaurus Jun 14 '09 at 3:25
3  
If I understand correctly, you are trying to use a pre-arranged, 256-bit key, specified, for example, as an array of bytes. If so, DarkSquid's approach using SecretKeySpec should work. It's also possible to derive an AES key from a password; if that's what you are after, please let me know, and I'll show you the correct way to to do it; simply hashing a password isn't the best practice. –  erickson Jun 14 '09 at 4:13
    
Be careful about padding a number, you may be making your AES less secure. –  Joshua Jun 14 '09 at 4:24
1  
@erickson: that is exatly what i need to do (derive an AES key from a password). –  Nippysaurus Jun 14 '09 at 4:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 212 down vote accepted

Share the password (a char[]) and salt (a byte[]—8 bytes selected by a SecureRandom makes a good salt—which doesn't need to be kept secret) with the recipient out-of-band. Then to derive a good key from this information (in Java 6):

/* Derive the key, given password and salt. */
SecretKeyFactory factory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBKDF2WithHmacSHA1");
KeySpec spec = new PBEKeySpec(password, salt, 65536, 256);
SecretKey tmp = factory.generateSecret(spec);
SecretKey secret = new SecretKeySpec(tmp.getEncoded(), "AES");
/* Encrypt the message. */
Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, secret);
AlgorithmParameters params = cipher.getParameters();
byte[] iv = params.getParameterSpec(IvParameterSpec.class).getIV();
byte[] ciphertext = cipher.doFinal("Hello, World!".getBytes("UTF-8"));

Now send the ciphertext and the iv to the recipient. The recipient generates a SecretKey in exactly the same way, using the same salt and password. Then initialize the cipher with the key and the initialization vector.

/* Decrypt the message, given derived key and initialization vector. */
Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, secret, new IvParameterSpec(iv));
String plaintext = new String(cipher.doFinal(ciphertext), "UTF-8");
System.out.println(plaintext);

A java.security.InvalidKeyException with the message "Illegal key size or default parameters" means that the cryptography strength is limited; the unlimited strength jurisdiction policy files are not in the correct location. In a JDK, they should be placed under ${jdk}/jre/lib/security

Based on the problem description, it sounds like the policy files are not correctly installed. Systems can easily have multiple Java runtimes; double-check to make sure that the correct location is being used.

share|improve this answer
17  
@Nick: Read PKCS #5. Salts are necessary for PBKDF2, which is why the API for password-based encryption requires them as input for key derivation. Without salts, a dictionary attack could be used, enabling a pre-computed list of the most likely symmetric encryption keys. Cipher IVs and key-derivation salts serve different purposes. IVs allow one reuse the same key for multiple messages. Salts prevent dictionary attacks on the key. –  erickson Jun 14 '09 at 23:26
1  
@erickson: in case you store iv, salt, etc. in the database, why not just use 'PBEWithMD5AndDES' and append the salt to the encrypted text, after loading u can strip the salt and use it for decryption. This way PBE is implemented in jasypt framework: www.jasypt.org –  Chris Oct 15 '09 at 15:46
2  
First, that would be DES encryption, not AES. Most providers don't have good support for the PBEwith<prf>and<encryption> algorithms; for example, the SunJCE doesn't provide and PBE for AES. Second, enabling jasypt is a non-goal. A package that purports to offer security without requiring an understanding of the underlying principles seems dangerous prima facie. –  erickson Oct 15 '09 at 16:10
4  
I've implemented @erickson's answer as a class: github.com/mrclay/jSecureEdit/tree/master/src/org/mrclay/crypto (PBE does the work, PBEStorage is a value object for storing the IV/ciphertext together.) –  Steve Clay Apr 21 '11 at 4:10
4  
For running this code, make sure you have the right Unlimited Strength Jurisdiction Policy Files in your JRE as stated in ngs.ac.uk/tools/jcepolicyfiles –  Amir Moghimi Jun 25 '12 at 6:01

After reading through erickson's suggestions, and gleaning what I could from a couple other postings and this example here, I've attempted to update Doug's code with the recommended changes. Feel free to edit to make it better.

  • Initialization Vector is no longer fixed
  • encryption key is derived using code from erickson
  • 8 byte salt is generated in setupEncrypt() using SecureRandom()
  • decryption key is generated from the encryption salt and password
  • decryption cipher is generated from decryption key and initialization vector
  • removed hex twiddling in lieu of org.apache.commons codec Hex routines

Some notes: This uses a 128 bit encryption key - java apparently won't do 256 bit encryption out-of-the-box. Implementing 256 requires installing some extra files into the java install directory.

Also, I'm not a crypto person. Take heed.

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.UnsupportedEncodingException;
import java.security.AlgorithmParameters;
import java.security.InvalidAlgorithmParameterException;
import java.security.InvalidKeyException;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.SecureRandom;
import java.security.spec.InvalidKeySpecException;
import java.security.spec.InvalidParameterSpecException;
import java.security.spec.KeySpec;

import javax.crypto.BadPaddingException;
import javax.crypto.Cipher;
import javax.crypto.CipherInputStream;
import javax.crypto.CipherOutputStream;
import javax.crypto.IllegalBlockSizeException;
import javax.crypto.NoSuchPaddingException;
import javax.crypto.SecretKey;
import javax.crypto.SecretKeyFactory;
import javax.crypto.spec.IvParameterSpec;
import javax.crypto.spec.PBEKeySpec;
import javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec;

import org.apache.commons.codec.DecoderException;
import org.apache.commons.codec.binary.Hex;

public class Crypto
{
    String mPassword = null;
    public final static int SALT_LEN = 8;
    byte [] mInitVec = null;
    byte [] mSalt = null;
    Cipher mEcipher = null;
    Cipher mDecipher = null;
    private final int KEYLEN_BITS = 128; // see notes below where this is used.
    private final int ITERATIONS = 65536;
    private final int MAX_FILE_BUF = 1024;

    /**
     * create an object with just the passphrase from the user. Don't do anything else yet 
     * @param password
     */
    public Crypto (String password)
    {
        mPassword = password;
    }

    /**
     * return the generated salt for this object
     * @return
     */
    public byte [] getSalt ()
    {
        return (mSalt);
    }

    /**
     * return the initialization vector created from setupEncryption
     * @return
     */
    public byte [] getInitVec ()
    {
        return (mInitVec);
    }

    /**
     * debug/print messages
     * @param msg
     */
    private void Db (String msg)
    {
        System.out.println ("** Crypt ** " + msg);
    }

    /**
     * this must be called after creating the initial Crypto object. It creates a salt of SALT_LEN bytes
     * and generates the salt bytes using secureRandom().  The encryption secret key is created 
     * along with the initialization vectory. The member variable mEcipher is created to be used
     * by the class later on when either creating a CipherOutputStream, or encrypting a buffer
     * to be written to disk.
     *  
     * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException
     * @throws InvalidKeySpecException
     * @throws NoSuchPaddingException
     * @throws InvalidParameterSpecException
     * @throws IllegalBlockSizeException
     * @throws BadPaddingException
     * @throws UnsupportedEncodingException
     * @throws InvalidKeyException
     */
    public void setupEncrypt () throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, 
                                                           InvalidKeySpecException, 
                                                           NoSuchPaddingException, 
                                                           InvalidParameterSpecException, 
                                                           IllegalBlockSizeException, 
                                                           BadPaddingException, 
                                                           UnsupportedEncodingException, 
                                                           InvalidKeyException
    {
        SecretKeyFactory factory = null;
        SecretKey tmp = null;

        // crate secureRandom salt and store  as member var for later use
         mSalt = new byte [SALT_LEN];
        SecureRandom rnd = new SecureRandom ();
        rnd.nextBytes (mSalt);
        Db ("generated salt :" + Hex.encodeHexString (mSalt));

        factory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBKDF2WithHmacSHA1");

        /* Derive the key, given password and salt. 
         * 
         * in order to do 256 bit crypto, you have to muck with the files for Java's "unlimted security"
         * The end user must also install them (not compiled in) so beware. 
         * see here:  http://www.javamex.com/tutorials/cryptography/unrestricted_policy_files.shtml
         */
        KeySpec spec = new PBEKeySpec (mPassword.toCharArray (), mSalt, ITERATIONS, KEYLEN_BITS);
        tmp = factory.generateSecret (spec);
        SecretKey secret = new SecretKeySpec (tmp.getEncoded(), "AES");

        /* Create the Encryption cipher object and store as a member variable
         */
        mEcipher = Cipher.getInstance ("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
        mEcipher.init (Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, secret);
        AlgorithmParameters params = mEcipher.getParameters ();

        // get the initialization vectory and store as member var 
        mInitVec = params.getParameterSpec (IvParameterSpec.class).getIV();

        Db ("mInitVec is :" + Hex.encodeHexString (mInitVec));
    }



    /**
     * If a file is being decrypted, we need to know the pasword, the salt and the initialization vector (iv). 
     * We have the password from initializing the class. pass the iv and salt here which is
     * obtained when encrypting the file initially.
     *   
     * @param initvec
     * @param salt
     * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException
     * @throws InvalidKeySpecException
     * @throws NoSuchPaddingException
     * @throws InvalidKeyException
     * @throws InvalidAlgorithmParameterException
     * @throws DecoderException
     */
    public void setupDecrypt (String initvec, String salt) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, 
                                                                                       InvalidKeySpecException, 
                                                                                       NoSuchPaddingException, 
                                                                                       InvalidKeyException, 
                                                                                       InvalidAlgorithmParameterException, 
                                                                                       DecoderException
    {
        SecretKeyFactory factory = null;
        SecretKey tmp = null;
        SecretKey secret = null;

        // since we pass it as a string of input, convert to a actual byte buffer here
        mSalt = Hex.decodeHex (salt.toCharArray ());
       Db ("got salt " + Hex.encodeHexString (mSalt));

        // get initialization vector from passed string
        mInitVec = Hex.decodeHex (initvec.toCharArray ());
        Db ("got initvector :" + Hex.encodeHexString (mInitVec));


        /* Derive the key, given password and salt. */
        // in order to do 256 bit crypto, you have to muck with the files for Java's "unlimted security"
        // The end user must also install them (not compiled in) so beware. 
        // see here: 
      // http://www.javamex.com/tutorials/cryptography/unrestricted_policy_files.shtml
        factory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBKDF2WithHmacSHA1");
        KeySpec spec = new PBEKeySpec(mPassword.toCharArray (), mSalt, ITERATIONS, KEYLEN_BITS);

        tmp = factory.generateSecret(spec);
        secret = new SecretKeySpec(tmp.getEncoded(), "AES");

        /* Decrypt the message, given derived key and initialization vector. */
        mDecipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
        mDecipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, secret, new IvParameterSpec(mInitVec));
    }


    /**
     * This is where we write out the actual encrypted data to disk using the Cipher created in setupEncrypt().
     * Pass two file objects representing the actual input (cleartext) and output file to be encrypted.
     * 
     * there may be a way to write a cleartext header to the encrypted file containing the salt, but I ran
     * into uncertain problems with that. 
     *  
     * @param input - the cleartext file to be encrypted
     * @param output - the encrypted data file
     * @throws IOException
     * @throws IllegalBlockSizeException
     * @throws BadPaddingException
     */
    public void WriteEncryptedFile (File input, File output) throws 
                                                                                          IOException, 
                                                                                          IllegalBlockSizeException, 
                                                                                          BadPaddingException
    {
        FileInputStream fin;
        FileOutputStream fout;
        long totalread = 0;
        int nread = 0;
        byte [] inbuf = new byte [MAX_FILE_BUF];

        fout = new FileOutputStream (output);
        fin = new FileInputStream (input);

        while ((nread = fin.read (inbuf)) > 0 )
        {
            Db ("read " + nread + " bytes");
            totalread += nread;

            // create a buffer to write with the exact number of bytes read. Otherwise a short read fills inbuf with 0x0
            // and results in full blocks of MAX_FILE_BUF being written. 
            byte [] trimbuf = new byte [nread];
            for (int i = 0; i < nread; i++)
                trimbuf[i] = inbuf[i];

            // encrypt the buffer using the cipher obtained previosly
            byte [] tmp = mEcipher.update (trimbuf);

            // I don't think this should happen, but just in case..
            if (tmp != null)
                fout.write (tmp);
        }

        // finalize the encryption since we've done it in blocks of MAX_FILE_BUF
        byte [] finalbuf = mEcipher.doFinal ();
        if (finalbuf != null)
            fout.write (finalbuf);

        fout.flush();
        fin.close();
        fout.close();
        fout.close ();

        Db ("wrote " + totalread + " encrypted bytes");
    }


    /**
     * Read from the encrypted file (input) and turn the cipher back into cleartext. Write the cleartext buffer back out
     * to disk as (output) File.
     * 
     * I left CipherInputStream in here as a test to see if I could mix it with the update() and final() methods of encrypting
     *  and still have a correctly decrypted file in the end. Seems to work so left it in.
     *  
     * @param input - File object representing encrypted data on disk 
     * @param output - File object of cleartext data to write out after decrypting
     * @throws IllegalBlockSizeException
     * @throws BadPaddingException
     * @throws IOException
     */
    public void ReadEncryptedFile (File input, File output) throws 
                                                                                                                                            IllegalBlockSizeException, 
                                                                                                                                            BadPaddingException, 
                                                                                                                                            IOException
    {
        FileInputStream fin; 
        FileOutputStream fout;
        CipherInputStream cin;
        long totalread = 0;
        int nread = 0;
        byte [] inbuf = new byte [MAX_FILE_BUF];

        fout = new FileOutputStream (output);
        fin = new FileInputStream (input);

        // creating a decoding stream from the FileInputStream above using the cipher created from setupDecrypt()
        cin = new CipherInputStream (fin, mDecipher);

        while ((nread = cin.read (inbuf)) > 0 )
        {
            Db ("read " + nread + " bytes");
            totalread += nread;

            // create a buffer to write with the exact number of bytes read. Otherwise a short read fills inbuf with 0x0
            byte [] trimbuf = new byte [nread];
            for (int i = 0; i < nread; i++)
                trimbuf[i] = inbuf[i];

            // write out the size-adjusted buffer
            fout.write (trimbuf);
        }

        fout.flush();
        cin.close();
        fin.close ();       
        fout.close();   

        Db ("wrote " + totalread + " encrypted bytes");
    }


    /**
     * adding main() for usage demonstration. With member vars, some of the locals would not be needed
     */
    public static void main(String [] args)
    {

        // create the input.txt file in the current directory before continuing
        File input = new File ("input.txt");
        File eoutput = new File ("encrypted.aes");
        File doutput = new File ("decrypted.txt");
        String iv = null;
        String salt = null;
        Crypto en = new Crypto ("mypassword");

        /*
         * setup encryption cipher using password. print out iv and salt
         */
        try
      {
          en.setupEncrypt ();
          iv = Hex.encodeHexString (en.getInitVec ()).toUpperCase ();
          salt = Hex.encodeHexString (en.getSalt ()).toUpperCase ();
      }
      catch (InvalidKeyException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (InvalidKeySpecException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (NoSuchPaddingException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (InvalidParameterSpecException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (IllegalBlockSizeException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (BadPaddingException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }

        /*
         * write out encrypted file
         */
        try
      {
          en.WriteEncryptedFile (input, eoutput);
          System.out.printf ("File encrypted to " + eoutput.getName () + "\niv:" + iv + "\nsalt:" + salt + "\n\n");
      }
      catch (IllegalBlockSizeException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (BadPaddingException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (IOException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }


        /*
         * decrypt file
         */
        Crypto dc = new Crypto ("mypassword");
        try
      {
          dc.setupDecrypt (iv, salt);
      }
      catch (InvalidKeyException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (InvalidKeySpecException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (NoSuchPaddingException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (InvalidAlgorithmParameterException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (DecoderException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }

        /*
         * write out decrypted file
         */
        try
      {
          dc.ReadEncryptedFile (eoutput, doutput);
          System.out.println ("decryption finished to " + doutput.getName ());
      }
      catch (IllegalBlockSizeException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (BadPaddingException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      catch (IOException e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
   }


}
share|improve this answer
2  
This is basically the same answer as that of Erickson, surrounded by a - not-that-well-programmed-in-my-opinion - wrapper.printStackTrace() –  owlstead May 9 at 14:06

Consider using the Spring Security Crypto Module

The Spring Security Crypto module provides support for symmetric encryption, key generation, and password encoding. The code is distributed as part of the core module but has no dependencies on any other Spring Security (or Spring) code.

It's provides a simple abstraction for encryption and seems to match what's required here,

The "standard" encryption method is 256-bit AES using PKCS #5's PBKDF2 (Password-Based Key Derivation Function #2). This method requires Java 6. The password used to generate the SecretKey should be kept in a secure place and not be shared. The salt is used to prevent dictionary attacks against the key in the event your encrypted data is compromised. A 16-byte random initialization vector is also applied so each encrypted message is unique.

A look at the internals reveals a structure similar to erickson's answer.

As noted in the question, this also requires the Java Cryptography Extension (JCE) Unlimited Strength Jurisdiction Policy (else you'll encounter InvalidKeyException: Illegal Key Size). It's downloadable for Java 6 and Java 7.

Example usage

import org.springframework.security.crypto.encrypt.Encryptors;
import org.springframework.security.crypto.encrypt.TextEncryptor;
import org.springframework.security.crypto.keygen.KeyGenerators;

public class CryptoExample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final String password = "I AM SHERLOCKED";  
        final String salt = KeyGenerators.string().generateKey();

        TextEncryptor encryptor = Encryptors.text(password, salt);      
        System.out.println("Salt: \"" + salt + "\"");

        String textToEncrypt = "*royal secrets*";
        System.out.println("Original text: \"" + textToEncrypt + "\"");

        String encryptedText = encryptor.encrypt(textToEncrypt);
        System.out.println("Encrypted text: \"" + encryptedText + "\"");

        // Could reuse encryptor but wanted to show reconstructing TextEncryptor
        TextEncryptor decryptor = Encryptors.text(password, salt);
        String decryptedText = decryptor.decrypt(encryptedText);
        System.out.println("Decrypted text: \"" + decryptedText + "\"");

        if(textToEncrypt.equals(decryptedText)) {
            System.out.println("Success: decrypted text matches");
        } else {
            System.out.println("Failed: decrypted text does not match");
        }       
    }
}

And sample output,

Salt: "feacbc02a3a697b0"
Original text: "*royal secrets*"
Encrypted text: "7c73c5a83fa580b5d6f8208768adc931ef3123291ac8bc335a1277a39d256d9a" 
Decrypted text: "*royal secrets*"
Success: decrypted text matches
share|improve this answer
    
Can you use that module without loading all of Spring? They don't seem to have made jar files available for download. –  theglauber Mar 13 at 15:56
1  
@theglauber Yes, you can use the module without Spring Security or the Spring framework. From looking at the pom, the only runtime dependency is apache commons-logging 1.1.1. You can pull in the jar with maven or download it directly from the official binary repo (see Spring 4 binaries download for more info on Spring binaries). –  John McCarthy Mar 13 at 16:48

What I've done in the past is hash the key via something like SHA256, then extract the bytes from the hash into the key byte[].

After you have your byte[] you can simply do:

SecretKeySpec key = new SecretKeySpec(keyBytes, "AES");
Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, key);
byte[] encryptedBytes = cipher.doFinal(clearText.getBytes());
share|improve this answer
7  
For others: this isn't a very secure method. You should use PBKDF 2 specified in PKCS#5. erickson said how to do this above. DarkSquid's method is vulnerable to password attacks and also doesn't work unless your plaintext's size is a multiple of AES's block size (128 bits) because he left out padding. Also it doesn't specify the mode; read Wikipedia's Block Cipher Modes of Operation for concerns. –  LaceCard Apr 28 '11 at 6:55
    
@DarkSquid Cipher aes256 = Cipher.getInstance("AES/OFB/NoPadding"); MessageDigest keyDigest = MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-256"); byte[] keyHash = keyDigest.digest(secret.getBytes("UTF-8")); SecretKeySpec key = new SecretKeySpec(keyHash, "AES"); aes256.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, key, new IvParameterSpec(initializationVector)); I'm also doing the same as suggested in your answer but I still end up with this java.security.InvalidKeyException: Illegal key size Is downloading JCE policy file mandatory? –  Niranjan Subramanian Apr 16 at 10:46

Generating your own key from a byte array is easy:

byte[] raw = ...; // 32 bytes in size for a 256 bit key
Key skey = new javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec(raw, "AES");

But creating a 256-bit key isn't enough. If the key generator cannot generate 256-bit keys for you, then the Cipher class probably doesn't support AES 256-bit either. You say you have the unlimited jurisdiction patch installed, so the AES-256 cipher should be supported (but then 256-bit keys should be too, so this might be a configuration problem).

Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, skey);
byte[] encrypted = cipher.doFinal(plainText.getBytes());

A workaround for lack of AES-256 support is to take some freely available implementation of AES-256, and use it as a custom provider. This involves creating your own Provider subclass and using it with Cipher.getInstance(String, Provider). But this can be an involved process.

share|improve this answer
3  
You should always indicate the mode and padding algorithm. Java uses the unsafe ECB mode by default. –  owlstead Feb 24 '12 at 23:54
    
You cannot create your own provider, providers have to be signed (can't believe I read over this mistake initially). Even if you could, the restriction of the key size is in the implementation of Cipher, not in the provider itself. You can use AES-256 in Java 8 and lower, but you need to use a proprietary API. Or a runtime that does not pose restrictions on the key size of course. –  owlstead May 9 at 14:01

I've implemented the erickson's answer in a really simple class:
Java AES 256-bit Encryption/Decryption class

If you get the java.security.InvalidKeyException you have to install the Java Cryptography Extension (JCE) unlimited strength jurisdiction policy files:

Just place the jars in your {JDK HOME}\jre\lib\security

share|improve this answer
3  
You appear to be sharing the same fixed salt value between all key instances. That's probably not a good idea. –  Luke Taylor Jun 24 '12 at 16:54
    
It works fine. However, if I am decrypting using a different instance of the AESEncrypter, the decrypted file tends to have some issues in the first few bytes (9 bytes). I encrypted a file using a passphrase then later I tried to decrypt using the same passphrase. All contents of the file except the first 9 bytes were decrypted properly. –  Jay Nov 26 '13 at 16:22
    
Might work fine, but fixed salt is akin to WEP encryption on your wi-fi router. –  wufoo Dec 2 '13 at 19:27
    
@Jay With cryptography, having just a working implementation is not the same as meeting your requirements. Again, this class is a wrapper around Erickson's solution (although the code itself seems OK at first sight, barring the static salt). Note that answers should not be link-only answers without explanation of the process that was followed. –  owlstead May 9 at 14:11
    
-1 This should have been a comment under Erickson's answer. There is no need to have a separate answer just to point out you've implemented someone else's code. –  Duncan Aug 4 at 11:41

Use this class for encryption. It works.

public class ObjectCrypter {


public static byte[] encrypt(byte[] ivBytes, byte[] keyBytes, byte[] mes) 
        throws NoSuchAlgorithmException,
        NoSuchPaddingException,
        InvalidKeyException,
        InvalidAlgorithmParameterException,
        IllegalBlockSizeException,
        BadPaddingException, IOException {

    AlgorithmParameterSpec ivSpec = new IvParameterSpec(ivBytes);
    SecretKeySpec newKey = new SecretKeySpec(keyBytes, "AES");
    Cipher cipher = null;
    cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
    cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, newKey, ivSpec);
    return  cipher.doFinal(mes);

}

public static byte[] decrypt(byte[] ivBytes, byte[] keyBytes, byte[] bytes) 
        throws NoSuchAlgorithmException,
        NoSuchPaddingException,
        InvalidKeyException,
        InvalidAlgorithmParameterException,
        IllegalBlockSizeException,
        BadPaddingException, IOException, ClassNotFoundException {

    AlgorithmParameterSpec ivSpec = new IvParameterSpec(ivBytes);
    SecretKeySpec newKey = new SecretKeySpec(keyBytes, "AES");
    Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
    cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, newKey, ivSpec);
    return  cipher.doFinal(bytes);

}

}

And these are ivBytes and a random key;

String key = "e8ffc7e56311679f12b6fc91aa77a5eb";

byte[] ivBytes = { 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00 };
keyBytes = key.getBytes("UTF-8");
share|improve this answer
2  
"it works".... yes, but it does not meet the requirements for creating a cryptographically secure solution (nor does it meet Java coding standards with regards to exception handling, in my opinion). –  owlstead May 9 at 14:13

protected by Community Aug 23 '13 at 12:30

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