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Is the most likely cause of an Error 28 - "Out of stack space" error an infinite or very deep recursion that is using up too much stack memory?

What are the other likely causes?

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I think the question is valid without code. In this case, if he knew the relevent code that caused the problem then he wouldn't need to ask the question. Though obviously a general question only gets general errors. For my two cents, I'd ask if you trapped the error in the debugger and inspected the call stack yet? –  tcarvin Mar 29 '12 at 12:03
    
@tcarvin: the error has not yet occurred in the debugger. Only on site. Unfortunately (and obviously) the code does not have proper error handling so a run-time error is all I have. –  CJ7 Mar 29 '12 at 12:46
    
Assuming you have had a good description of the steps to reproduce the error, but you can't reproduce it on your development machines, and after reading the relevant code nothing obvious stands out. Then you need to add some logging and some error handling and send a new build to the site so they can reproduce it and then send back the logs. –  MarkJ Mar 29 '12 at 16:19
    
@MarkJ: Yes, that is a good plan, but what if time is of the essence? If I need to quickly find out what the cause of this error in a module without deploying a new build to a site, what should I be looking for in the code? –  CJ7 Apr 5 '12 at 11:23
1  
@CraigJ Martin's answer is good. "Event cascades" can be difficult to spot. Sometimes you have an event handler which changes an innocuous property of a control - but that property change triggers the event again. (Or it triggers another event, which changes a different property... and eventually you end up back at the initial property). –  MarkJ Apr 5 '12 at 15:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your error is described over here in MSDN.

Note: This MSDN article is related to Visual Studio 2005. But it's likely to say that the same limits are for VB6.

  • Check that procedures are not nested too deeply.
  • Make sure recursive procedures terminate properly.
  • If local variables require more local variable space than is available, try declaring some variables at the module level. You can also declare all variables in the procedure static by preceding the Property, Sub, or Function keyword with Static. Or you can use the Static statement to declare individual static variables within procedures.
  • Redefine some of your fixed-length strings as variable-length strings, as fixed-length strings use more stack space than variable-length strings. You can also define the string at module level where it requires no stack space.
  • Check the number of nested DoEvents function calls, by using the Calls dialog box to view which procedures are active on the stack.
  • Make sure you did not cause an "event cascade" by triggering an event that calls an event procedure already on the stack. An event cascade is similar to an unterminated recursive procedure call, but it is less obvious, since the call is made by Visual Basic rather than an explicit call in the code. Use the Calls dialog box to view which procedures are active on the stack.

[update]

You can find the Visual Studio 6 (VB6) article over here.

  • You have too many active Function, Sub, or Property procedure calls. Check that procedures aren't nested too deeply. This is especially true with recursive procedures, that is, procedures that call themselves. Make sure recursive procedures terminate properly. Use the Calls dialog box to view which procedures are active (on the stack).
  • Your local variables require more local variable space than is available. Try declaring some variables at the module level instead. You can also declare all variables in the procedure static by preceding the Property, Sub, or Function keyword with Static. Or you can use the Static statement to declare individual Static variables within procedures.
  • You have too many fixed-length strings. Fixed-length strings in a procedure are more quickly accessed, but use more stack space than variable-length strings, because the string data itself is placed on the stack. Try redefining some of your fixed-length strings as variable-length strings. When you declare variable-length strings in a procedure, only the string descriptor (not the data itself) is placed on the stack. You can also define the string at module level where it requires no stack space. Variables declared at module level are Public by default, so the string is visible to all procedures in the module.
  • You have too many nested DoEvents function calls. Use the Calls dialog box to view which procedures are active on the stack.
  • Your code triggered an event cascade. An event cascade is caused by triggering an event that calls an event procedure that's already on the stack. An event cascade is similar to an unterminated recursive procedure call, but it's less obvious, since the call is made by Visual Basic rather than by an explicit call in your code. Use the Calls dialog box to view which procedures are active (on the stack).
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2  
+1 "Event cascades" can be difficult to spot. Sometimes you have an event handler which changes an innocuous property of a control - but that property change triggers the event again. (Or it triggers another event, which changes a different property... and eventually you end up back at the initial property). –  MarkJ Apr 5 '12 at 15:38
    
If you can provide a link to the equivalent VB6 article then I will award this answer. I think this is only fair since the question was about VB6. –  CJ7 Apr 14 '12 at 1:37
    
I found the correct article and updated the answer. –  Martin Apr 16 '12 at 10:00

I had a case where instead of:

Public Property Let EmployeeNo(ByVal vdata As String)
    mvarEmployeeNo = vdata
End Property

I have by mistake:

Public Property Let EmployeeNo(ByVal vdata As String)
    EmployeeNo = vdata
End Property
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Yes that is the most likely cause.

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Does anyone fancy explaining the downvote? I answered the question exactly as asked. –  Deanna Mar 30 '12 at 12:54
    
+1 I agree, you answered the the first question asked. –  tcarvin Mar 31 '12 at 16:42
1  
this really made me spray whatever i got in my mouth and yea i agree. –  Berker Yüceer May 31 '12 at 10:24
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Jon Lin Apr 3 '13 at 13:47
    
@JonLin Erm, sorry? As I commented at the time, it answers exactly the question that was asked. –  Deanna Apr 3 '13 at 14:12

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