Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have many different small classes which have a few fields each, e.g. this:

class Article:
    def __init__(self, name, available):
        self.name = name
        self.available = available

What's the easiest and/or most idiomatic way to make the name field read only, so that

a = Article("Pineapple", True)
a.name = "Banana"  # <-- should not be possible

is not possible anymore?

Here's what I considered so far:

  1. Use a getter (ugh!).

    class Article:
        def __init__(self, name, available):
            self._name = name
            self.available = available
    
        def name(self):
            return self._name
    

    Ugly, non-pythonic - and a lot of boilerplate code to write (especially if I have multiple fields to make read-only). However, it does the job and it's easy to see why that is.

  2. Use __setattr__:

    class Article:
        def __init__(self, name, available):
            self.name = name
            self.available = available
    
        def __setattr__(self, name, value):
            if name == "name":
                raise Exception("%s property is read-only" % name)
            self.__dict__[name] = value
    

    Looks pretty on the caller side, seems to be the idiomatic way to do the job - but unfortunately I have many classes with only a few fields to make read only each. So I'd need to add a __setattr__ implementation to all of them. Or use some sort of mixin maybe? In any case, I'd need to make up my mind how to behave in case a client attempts to assign a value to a read-only field. Yield some exception, I guess - but which?

  3. Use a utility function to define properties (and optionally getters) automatically. This is basically the same idea as (1) except that I don't write the getters explicitely but rather do something like

    class Article:
        def __init__(self, name, available):
            # This function would somehow give a '_name' field to self
            # and a 'name()' getter to the 'Article' class object (if
            # necessary); the getter simply returns self._name
            defineField(self, "name")
            self.available = available
    

    The downside of this is that I don't even know if this is possible (or how to implement it) since I'm not familiar with runtime code generation in Python. :-)

So far, (2) appears to be most promising to me except for the fact that I'll need __setattr__ definitions to all my classes. I wish there was a way to 'annotate' fields so that this happens automatically. Does anybody have a better idea?

For what it's worth, I'mu sing Python 2.6.

UPDATE: Thanks for all the interesting responses! By now, I have this:

def ro_property(o, name, value):
    setattr(o.__class__, name, property(lambda o: o.__dict__["_" + name]))
    setattr(o, "_" + name, value)

class Article(object):
    def __init__(self, name, available):
        ro_property(self, "name", name)
        self.available = available

This seems to work quite nicely. The only changes needed to the original class are

  • I need to inherit object (which is not such a stupid thing anyway, I guess)
  • I need to change self._name = name to ro_property(self, "name", name).

This looks quite neat to me - can anybody see a downside with it?

share|improve this question
2  
Your ro_property is way too complicated -- either Sven's or Chris's answer is the way to go. –  Ethan Furman Mar 30 '12 at 22:35
    
@EthanFurman it is tricky, but maybe that is the price you have to pay if you would like to keep the changes done to existing classes to the minimum? –  Frerich Raabe Mar 31 '12 at 18:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 28 down vote accepted

I would use property as a decorator to manage your getter for name (see the example for the class Parrot in the documentation). Use, for example, something like:

class Article(object):
    def __init__(self, name, available):
        self._name = name
        self.available = available

    @property
    def name(self):
        return self._name

If you do not define the setter for the name property (using the decorator x.setter around a function) this throws an AttributeError when you try and reset name.

Note: You have to use Python's new-style classes (i.e. in Python 2.6 you have to inherit from object) for properties to work correctly. This is not the case according to @SvenMarnach.

share|improve this answer
1  
This looks pretty on the caller side, but it still looks like boiler plate when actually writing the classes. It would be beautiful if I could do something like @property self_name = name or so in the constructor so that Python would define the getter for me automatically. As it is, this code is nicer for the caller, but even more code to write for the class author than a plain getter (the extra line for @property). –  Frerich Raabe Mar 29 '12 at 7:30
    
Something like @property self._name = name would be nice, but decorators work on functions rather than objects. It is an extra line on your getter idea, but this is the idiomatic way of doing it, and the way the Python documentation demonstrates creating read-only class variables. Ultimately you will always need some boilerplate code to redefine the default behaviour of class variables. –  Chris Mar 29 '12 at 7:34
1  
Properties also work on old-style classes. The descriptor itself, i.e. the class property itself, must be a new-style class, but it is. The Python documentation is a bit misleading in this regard. –  Sven Marnach Mar 29 '12 at 12:11
    
@SvenMarnach Thanks for that - I am obviously mistaken and have updated my answer. –  Chris Mar 30 '12 at 11:52
1  
Accepting this; it's not as compact as other answers (or what I came up with myself by now) but it seems that this is the best solution overall: it's not too noisy and it's idiomatic. As @SvenMarnach put it: "Everyone familiar with Python will recognize this pattern, and there's no domain-specific voodoo happening." –  Frerich Raabe Apr 30 '12 at 18:56

As pointed out in other answers, using a property is the way to go for read-only attributes. The solution in Chris' answer is the cleanest one: It uses the property() built-in in a straight-forward, simple way. Everyone familiar with Python will recognize this pattern, and there's no domain-specific voodoo happening.

If you don't like that every property needs three lines to define, here's another straight-forward way:

from operator import attrgetter

class Article(object):
    def __init__(self, name, available):
        self._name = name
        self.available = available
    name = property(attrgetter("_name"))

Generally, I don't like defining domain-specific functions to do something that can be done easily enough with standard tools. Reading code is so much easier if you don't have to get used to all the project-specific stuff first.

share|improve this answer
2  
Your reasoning about why Chris' answer is so good really won me over. I thought that some clever trick along the lines of what rodrigo posted would be really neat but indeed, I did get some raised eyebrows for so much magic in one place. –  Frerich Raabe Apr 30 '12 at 18:58

Based in the Chris answer, but arguably more pythonic:

def ro_property(field):
    return property(lambda self : self.__dict__[field])

class Article(object):
    name = ro_property('_name')

    def __init__(self):
        self._name = "banana"

If trying to modify the property it will raise an AttributeError.

a = Article()
print a.name # -> 'banana'
a.name = 'apple' # -> AttributeError: can't set attribute

UPDATE: About your updated answer, the (little) problem I see is that you are modifying the definition of the property in the class every time you create an instance. And I don't think that is such a good idea. That's why I put the ro_property call outside of the __init__ function

What about?:

def ro_property(name):
    def ro_property_decorator(c):
        setattr(c, name, property(lambda o: o.__dict__["_" + name]))
        return c
    return ro_property_decorator

@ro_property('name')
@ro_property('other')
class Article(object):
    def __init__(self, name):
        self._name = name
        self._other = "foo"

a = Article("banana")
print a.name # -> 'banana'
a.name = 'apple' # -> AttributeError: can't set attribute

Class decorators are fancy!

share|improve this answer
    
I like how this reduces the amount of change to be done to the classes. –  Frerich Raabe Mar 29 '12 at 8:48
    
Thanks a ton for this answer, please see my updated answer for what I now have. It achieves just what I need I think, and the chagne to the original class is just one line (instead of self._prop = prop I now do ro_property(self, "prop", prop)). –  Frerich Raabe Mar 29 '12 at 8:52
    
Please, see my updated answer with a new proposal. –  rodrigo Mar 29 '12 at 9:34
    
Oh, your concern regarding my current solution makes total sense (I was thinking of it myself when writing the code). I really like your new version, it has a very "declarative" touch to it. :-) –  Frerich Raabe Mar 29 '12 at 9:49

It should be noted that it's always possible to modify attributes of an object in Python - there are no truly private variables in Python. It's just that some approaches make it a bit harder. But a determined coder can always lookup and modify the value of an attribute. For example, I can always modify your __setattr__ if I want to...

For more information, see Section 9.6 of The Python Tutorial. Python uses name mangling when attributes are prefixed with __ so the actual name at runtime is different but you could still derive what that name at runtime is (and thus modify the attribute).

share|improve this answer

I would stick with your option 1 but refined it to use Python property:

class Article
    def get_name(self):
        return self.__name

    name = property(get_name)
share|improve this answer
2  
Double underscores are to prevent subclasses accidentally overriding fields. For regular "private" fields the single underscore is correct. Also, it's better to use property as a decorator. –  agf Mar 29 '12 at 7:26
1  
Hm, sounds interestinig (especially if I could pass a lambda to property...), but I can't seem to get it working. get_name would be a global method, and the name assignment would be done in the constructor? –  Frerich Raabe Mar 29 '12 at 7:28
1  
Thanks agf. The above code should be placed within your class, not globally. –  Pinch Mar 29 '12 at 7:34
1  
This does not work. You at least need return self.__name. –  Sven Marnach Mar 29 '12 at 12:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.