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struct list{
   char *Name;
};

void chekFC(struct list *newList){
  char *fC = newList->Name;
  printf("%s\n", &fC);                   //I can print it
  if(fC[0] == '+')                       //Any error??
  printf("Yes");
}

int main(){
   struct list *newList = (struct list *)malloc(sizeof(struct list));
   newList->Name = "+abc";
   chekFC(newList);
}

it can run, if I change the code to following

void chekFC(struct list *newList){
  char *fC = newList->Name;
  printf("%s\n", &fC);                   //I can print it
  if(fC[0] == '+')  {}                     // Add {}  nothing run in the if condition, than the program can run
  printf("Yes");
}

Why this program cannot run? The error is Segmentation fault (core dumped)

share|improve this question
    
You probably never initialized newList->Name... –  Mysticial Mar 29 '12 at 7:49
1  
It's impossible to tell what's wrong from just this code fragment. Please post the smallest complete program that exhibits the problem. –  Spire Mar 29 '12 at 7:51
    
Show the full code, specifically the bit that allocates newList->Name –  David Heffernan Mar 29 '12 at 7:59
    
also don't cast the return of malloc, void* converts well to any object pointer type in C. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 29 '12 at 8:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

there have one problem in you code.

printf("%s\n", &fC);

you should change it to

printf("%s\n", fC);

I think you don't understand the C pointer very clearly. the &fC is very different from fC, you can print it by "%p" to see it.

printf("fC %p, &fC %p\n", fC, &fC);

&fC is address of fC, fC is address of string of "+abc". I want it can help you, but I suggest you should read some book, to learn C pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You Very Much –  Eric Tang Mar 29 '12 at 10:43
    
You are right. I have very poor concept about C pointer. –  Eric Tang Mar 29 '12 at 10:54

Are you sure newList->Name has been allocated?

share|improve this answer
    
I think so. Because I can print out Name from the newList. –  Eric Tang Mar 29 '12 at 7:53
    
by printf("@@%s\n", &newList->Name); –  Eric Tang Mar 29 '12 at 7:55
    
@Andreas, isn't the line newList->Name = "+abc"; an allocation in the text segment ? –  Manuel Selva Mar 29 '12 at 8:28

newList->name has never been allocated.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I already allocated it –  Eric Tang Mar 29 '12 at 8:22
    
@dexametason, isn't the line newList->Name = "+abc"; an allocation in the text segment ? –  Manuel Selva Mar 29 '12 at 8:29
    
He's not modifying it, so it's ok. The pointer should be valid. –  dragonx Mar 29 '12 at 15:16

To consistently avoid such problems in the future, I recommend using assertions:

assert(newList);
assert(newList->Name);
share|improve this answer
printf("%s\n", &fC);

is wrong, you probably mean

printf("%s\n", fC);
share|improve this answer
    
I cannot run the program if change to printf("%s\n", fC); –  Eric Tang Mar 29 '12 at 8:17
    
Segmentation fault (core dumped) –  Eric Tang Mar 29 '12 at 8:17
    
this is probably the fact that you cast the return of malloc because you are missing the correct #include for it. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 29 '12 at 8:48

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