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I want to make a regular expression that matches the form (+92)-(21)-1234.... I made this program

public static void main(String[] args) {

    // A regex and a string in which to search are specifi ed
    String regEx = "([+]\\d{2})-(\\d{2})-\\d+";
    String phoneNumber = "(+92)-(21)-1234567890";

    // Obtain the required matcher
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(regEx);
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(phoneNumber);

    if (matcher.matches()) {
        System.out.println("Phone Number Valid");
    } else {
        System.out.println("Phone Number must be in the form (+xx)-(xx)-xxxxx..");
    }

} //end of main()

The regular expression i created like starts with the bracket((), +[+], two numbers(\d{2}), bracket close()), a dash(-), start bracket((), two numbers(\d{2}), bracket close()), a dash(-) and then any number of digits(\d+). But it is not working. What i am doing wrong?

Thanks

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You should escape the ( and ) brackets, they are used for grouping in regular expressions, and you also have to escape the + sign. –  pushy Mar 29 '12 at 8:06
2  
@pushy: I believe that using [+] is okay, but \\+ would be clearer. –  Jon Skeet Mar 29 '12 at 8:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The regular expression i created like starts with the bracket(()

No, it starts with a grouping construct - that's what an unescaped ( means in a regular expression. I haven't looked at the rest of the expression in detail, but try just escaping the brackets:

String regEx = "\\([+]\\d{2}\\)-\\(\\d{2}\\)-\\d+";

Or a nicer (IMO) way of saying that you need the +

String regEx = "\\(\\+\\d{2}\\)-\\(\\d{2}\\)-\\d+";
share|improve this answer
    
This is the fun part I love about regexes in Java - there always are a lot more backslashes than valid characters. –  Slanec Mar 29 '12 at 8:12
    
Hmm it means if i just want to use + not [+], then i should use \\ before + like \\+. Any character that i use in the regEx must start with \\, like \( for opening bracket and \) for closing bracket and \\+ for plus. And the other way is to use [(] and [)] for open and close brackets as suggested by the Amit Bhargava and others. Am i right? –  Basit Mar 29 '12 at 8:22
    
@Basit: it's not any character... it's any character that has a special meaning in a regular expression. I wouldn't normally use [...] as that is usually used for "match any character in this set". –  Jon Skeet Mar 29 '12 at 8:25
    
HHmm ok now i got it. You mean to say that we use + in regular expression to append any number of characters so i must use \\ before it(\\+), same for ( and ) as they are use to make groups in regular expressions. But 'a' or any alphabet has no special meaning in regular expression so i can use just a, no need this time \\a. Am i right now? –  Basit Mar 29 '12 at 8:53
    
@Basit: Exactly. Indeed, for some letters you'd find that meant something entirely different - such as \d meaning "digit". (It's important that you understand that \` in a Java literal just means ` in the regular expression itself, btw.) –  Jon Skeet Mar 29 '12 at 8:59

Escape the parentheses and the dashes

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You need to escape the parantheses (as Jon already mentioned they create a capturing group):

public static void main(String[] args) {

     // A regex and a string in which to search are specifi ed
     String regEx = "\\([+]\\d{2}\\)-\\(\\d{2}\\)-\\d+";
     String phoneNumber = "(+92)-(21)-1234567890";

     // Obtain the required matcher
     Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(regEx);
     Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(phoneNumber);

     if (matcher.matches()) {
         System.out.println("Phone Number Valid");
     } else {
         System.out.println("Phone Number must be in the form (+xx)-(xx)-xxxxx..");
     }

}

Output:

Phone Number Valid

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The correct regex is

[(][+]\\d{2}[)]-[(]\\d{2}[)]-\\d+

You just needed to put your brackets between [ and ].

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if the plus symbol is always there you could just write \\+, if it may or may not be there, \\+?. You should escape all regex-specific characters like this

String regEx = "\\(\\+\\d{2}\\)-\\(\\d{2}\\)-\\d+";
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