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(Using Java) I am implementing a generic class which is a B-Tree. When the user runs the program they can supply some arguments which will determine the type of the tree (Integer, Character, Double or String).

In my main method I have this code:

// Get user input and split it into tokens
// Tokens[1] = the type specified by the user

if( tokens[1].equals("DOUBLE"))
    BTree<Double> t = new BTree<Double>();

else if( tokens[1].equals("CHARACTER"))
    BTree<Character> t = new BTree<Character>();

else if( tokens[1].equals("INTEGER"))
    BTree<Integer> t = new BTree<Integer>();

else if( tokens[1].equals("STRING"))
    BTree<String> t = new BTree<String>();

But the compiler complains if I have the if statements. If I remove them then it compiles and runs fine :/ how can I fix this? So that the user can supply the type and the tree will be created depending on the type supplied? Thanks.

Here is some of the compiler output:

C:\Users\User\Desktop>javac *.java
Main.java:42: error: cannot find symbol
BTree<Double> t = new BTree<Double>();
symbol:   variable BTree
location: class Main

Main.java:42: error: cannot find symbol
BTree<Double> t = new BTree<Double>();
symbol:   variable Double
location: class Main

Main.java:42: error: cannot find symbol
BTree<Double> t = new BTree<Double>();
symbol:   variable t
location: class Main

.. There is more but it is similar and repeated for each of the types

share|improve this question
2  
Could you provide compiler log? – mishadoff Mar 29 '12 at 8:08
    
i have edited it into the question :) – Tim Mar 29 '12 at 8:14
    
Question title says: Create an object of an abstract class but actually you're asking something different. – anubhava Mar 29 '12 at 8:16
    
Your question states an abstract class, or is it simply a generic class? – jb10210 Mar 29 '12 at 8:17
    
sorry i meant to say generic.. i edited the question :) – Tim Mar 29 '12 at 8:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The variable t in each of the if statements is only defined in the if's context, outside them the compiler won't recognize them.
Define your variable t before the if statements.

BTree<?> t = null;
if( tokens[1].equals("DOUBLE")) {
    t = new BTree<Double>();
}
else if( tokens[1].equals("CHARACTER")) {
    t = new BTree<Character>();
}
else if( tokens[1].equals("INTEGER")) {
    t = new BTree<Integer>();
}
else if( tokens[1].equals("STRING")) {
    t = new BTree<String>();
}
// now you can use your 't'
share|improve this answer
    
cool thanks :) this also works.. – Tim Mar 29 '12 at 8:17
    
@Tim you should also make a habit of inserting brackets for each if statement, even for one-liners – jb10210 Mar 29 '12 at 8:35

Your BTree<T> class should not be abstract, since you seem to want to instanciate the same functionality for all kinds of the type T.

If you need specific functionality for different types of T, you'd need to either implement

class CharacterBTree extends BTree<Character>

or do it on the fly like

 BTree<Character> t = new BTree<Character>() {
    ...
 };

Also; declare your BTree<T> t variable outside of the if's, so your code becomes

BTree<?> t = null;
if ("char".equals(whatever)) {
   t = new BTree<Character>();
} else if {
  ...
}
share|improve this answer

Insert curly brackets:

if( tokens[1].equals("DOUBLE")){
    BTree<Double> t = new BTree<Double>();
}
else if( tokens[1].equals("CHARACTER")){
    BTree<Character> t = new BTree<Character>();
}
else if( tokens[1].equals("INTEGER")){
    BTree<Integer> t = new BTree<Integer>();
}
else if( tokens[1].equals("STRING")){
    BTree<String> t = new BTree<String>();
}

Or declare your tree before the statetment:

BTree<? extends Object> t = null;
if( tokens[1].equals("DOUBLE"))
    t = new BTree<Double>();
else if( tokens[1].equals("CHARACTER"))
    t = new BTree<Character>();
else if( tokens[1].equals("INTEGER"))
    t = new BTree<Integer>();
else if( tokens[1].equals("STRING"))
    t = new BTree<String>();
share|improve this answer
2  
This'll get it to compile, but using t later in a shared way will be difficult. The fundamental problem is that each t is a different type. – Jeff Foster Mar 29 '12 at 8:12
    
wow this works! thanks it was so simple... – Tim Mar 29 '12 at 8:16
1  
Unless you are only creating the object for the constructor's side effects, this won't help since each t is visible only within a one-line scope and not accessible to outside code. Otherwise, you should declare T before the conditional statements and only assign it values within the nested blocks. – Michał Kosmulski Mar 29 '12 at 8:21
    
@JeffFoster each t is not a different type, they all are the same type at runtime. – jb10210 Mar 29 '12 at 8:21

i'd use a case-switch statement (maybe it's not the solution you need, as mishandoff said, seeing the log could help a little bit more) just from a logical point of view:

switch(tokens[1]) {
    case "DOUBLE" : BTree<Double> t = new BTree<Double>(); break;
    ....
    ....
}
share|improve this answer

If you're trying to something like

if (tokens[1].equals("DOUBLE"))
  BTree<Double> t = new BTree<Double>();
else if (tokens[1].equals("CHARACTER"))
  BTree<Character> t = new BTree<Character>();
// etc.

t.doStuff();

That won't work. First, because the t variables are only in scope within their if statements, and second, because you can't make a variable have different static types along different code paths.

You could do something like

BTree<?> t;
if (tokens[1].equals("DOUBLE"))
  t = new BTree<Double>();
else if (tokens[1].equals("CHARACTER"))
  t = new BTree<Character>();
// etc.

But then you can't do anything useful with the items stored in t afterward because the code that follows doesn't know what it's a tree of. This is more of a fundamental design problem, not a syntax problem.

You could create an interface — let's call it ValueHolder — and use it to define whatever operations you need to do on the values in the tree. Then define classes like DoubleHolder, CharacterHolder, and so on, which implement the ValueHolder interface. Then you can write:

BTree<? extends ValueHolder> t;
if (tokens[1].equals("DOUBLE"))
  t = new BTree<DoubleHolder>();
else if (tokens[1].equals("CHARACTER"))
  t = new BTree<CharacterHolder>();
// etc.

and afterward, you can retrieve items from the tree and they'll be of type ValueHolder so you can call any of the methods provided by that interface.

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