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I have to implement a few action. Each of they have some common elements, so they should inherit from one class. Lets say, that they are do some web actions, so base class is

public class WebAction
{
    private ServerData _serverData;
    public WebAction(ServerData serverData)
    {
        _serverData = serverData;
    }
}

Also, each of this action need to be execute, so in base class I also should have some sort of Execute() Method. Problem is, that each of this object do a little bit different thing, so It should take different parameters. My question is - witch way is best for reach this?

At first I was thinking abut some configuration object, e,g. Execute(IWebActionConfig config). In this case, I can use object like:

 LoginWebAction loginWebAction = LoginWebAction(staticServerConfig);
 LoginWebActionConfig = new LoginWebActionConfig { someData = "foo" };
 loginWebAction.Execute(loginWebActionConfig);

But is there any sense to create an additional tree of objects? Maybe will be better to configure each child of WebAction by properties?

LoginWebAction loginWebAction = LoginWebAction(staticServerConfig);
loginWebAction.someData = "foo";
// Execute will throw exception when someData not set
loginWebAction.Execute();

With of these (if any) way is better?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is possible to do in more OOP style. look at NVI pattern

public class WebAction
{
  private ServerData _serverData;
  public WebAction(ServerData serverData)
  {
    _serverData = serverData;
  }
  public virtual ExecuteAction{};
  public Execute()
  {
     ExecuteAction();
     //to do the rest of base code 

  }
}
public class WebActionDerived1: WebAction
{
   WebActionDerived1(ServerData serverData, object arg1/*any unique param*/)
   :base(serverData)
   {
      _my_arg1 = arg1;
   }
   public override ExecuteAction
   {
    //call any procedure with your _my_arg1;
   }
}
public class WebActionDerived2: WebAction
{
   WebActionDerived1(ServerData serverData, string arg1,
   string arg2/*otherunique param*/)
   :base(serverData)
   {
      _my_arg1 = arg1;
      _my_arg2 = arg2;
   }
   public override ExecuteAction
   {
    //call any procedure with your _my_arg1, and _my_arg2;
   }
}
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I think you might use the Command Pattern here. You can create different commands (one command for each web-action)that encapsulate your "Action" and each of them will have all the parameters they need.

The command handler will contain the "Logic" for executing that command.

more info about command pattern at :

http://www.codeguru.com/csharp/.net/net_general/patterns/article.php/c15663/Implement-a-Command-Pattern-Using-C.htm

http://danielshitrit.blogspot.co.uk/2011/11/best-practices-command-pattern-in-c.html

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As each action takes different parameters you aren't really going to be able to use polymorphism to invoke them. In other words the method that calls Execute on your class is going to have to know the exact type of the class it is going to call Execute on.

So, I would question whether using inheritance is really the correct solution here.

You state that you are using inheritance because each class has some shared code. This is normally not a good enough reason to use inheritance. I would view it as an anti-pattern.

The problem with using inheritance is that that you are tightly coupling the base class to the derived class. This can cause problems with unit testing and future maintenance.

I would suggest it worth creating a separate class that contains the shared functionality. Then your Action classes that contain this class as a member and call as necessary. This will allow you to mock this base class for testing purposes. Then each of these classes can have their own Execute method each with the required parameters.

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