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I have a HTML/XML document similar to the following. There can be one or more 'tr' of the same colour before switching to the other colour in an arbitrarily repeating pattern. This is an example:

<tr class='red'></tr>
<tr class='blue'></tr>
<tr class='red'></tr>
<tr class='red'></tr>
<tr class='red'></tr>
<tr class='blue'></tr>
<tr class='blue'></tr>
<tr class='red'></tr>
<tr class='red'></tr>
<tr class='blue'></tr>

What I am looking for is an XPath (1.0) expression which, starting from the first 'tr' in any colour 'block' (note that there is no markup indicating these blocks, only alterations in the colour), selects the following subsequent 'tr's within that block only.

I have tried the following expression

./following-sibling::tr[@class=preceding-sibling::tr[1]/@class]

but this also selects the second+ 'tr's of subsequent blocks. I feel like I'm close to what I need, but can't quite manage it.

Thanks in advance.

Edit: The desired output is a nodeset containing the subsequent 'tr's within the block (and only that block).

share|improve this question
    
I'm a bit confused... Can you post the desired output, too? –  Lukas Eder Mar 29 '12 at 9:00
    
So as an example, if my starting point was the 3rd 'tr' (red), I would select the 4th and 5th 'tr's only. –  user1300244 Mar 29 '12 at 9:28
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This XPath 1.0 expression selects the first "block" of blue tr elements:

      (/*/tr[@class='blue'][1] | /*/tr[@class='blue'][1]/following-sibling::tr)
        [count(. | /*/tr[@class='blue'][1]
                          /following-sibling::tr
                                    [not(@class='blue')][1]
                                       /preceding-sibling::*
               )
        =
         count(/*/tr[@class='blue'][1]
                          /following-sibling::tr
                                    [not(@class='blue')][1]
                                       /preceding-sibling::*
         )
         ]

Explanation:

Using the wellknown Kayessian formula for node-set intersection:

$ns1[count(.|$ns2) = count($ns2)]

This XPath expression selects exactly the nodes that belong to both the node-set $ns1 and the node-set $ns2.

In this particular case we simply substitute $ns1 and $ns2 with their appropriate specific XPath expressions -- one is the first blue tr and all of its following siblings, the other is the first non-blue tr following the first blue tr and all of its preceding siblings. The intersection of these two node-sets is exactly the wanted first block of blue trs.

XSLT - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy-of select=
  "(/*/tr[@class='blue'][1] | /*/tr[@class='blue'][1]/following-sibling::tr)
            [count(. | /*/tr[@class='blue'][1]
                              /following-sibling::tr
                                        [not(@class='blue')][1]
                                           /preceding-sibling::*
                   )
            =
             count(/*/tr[@class='blue'][1]
                              /following-sibling::tr
                                        [not(@class='blue')][1]
                                           /preceding-sibling::*
                 )
             ]
  "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the following XML document:

<t>
    <tr class='red'></tr>
    <tr class='red'></tr>
    <tr class='red'></tr>
    <tr class='red'></tr>
    <tr class='blue'></tr>
    <tr class='blue'></tr>
    <tr class='red'></tr>
    <tr class='red'></tr>
    <tr class='blue'></tr>
</t>

the XPath expression is evaluated and the selected nodes are copied to the output:

<tr class="blue"/>
<tr class="blue"/>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. However, I'm looking for a general XPath to select any block using it's first <tr> as a start point. I understand the set intersection concept and I'm trying to rewrite the expression myself, but I can't get it to work. If you have time, I'd appreciate a general solution :) –  user1300244 Mar 29 '12 at 15:28
    
@user1300244: This answer completely solves the problem that is currently described in the question. If you have other requirements, please, edit the question and specify exactly the nodes you want the XPath to select. –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 29 '12 at 15:42
    
Sorry, I disagree. The question states "What I am looking for is an XPath (1.0) expression which, starting from the first 'tr' in any colour 'block' selects the following subsequent 'tr's within that block only." –  user1300244 Mar 29 '12 at 15:48
    
@user1300244: This isn't well-defined at all. What is the meaning of "any block"? This needs to be specified exactly, if you want the XPath expression to select the wanted nodes. For example, the expression in my answer shows how to select the wanted nodes for the first blue block. You need to say which block -- without using variable references you cannot generally specify "any block". –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 29 '12 at 15:53
    
Ah, that is what I was hoping I could do. Thank you for your time, I've learnt something even if it wasn't as complete an answer to my question as I had hoped. –  user1300244 Mar 29 '12 at 16:08
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If you have a variable $v bound to the starting node then I think it can be done (with horrendous inefficiency) like this:

$v/following-sibling::tr[@class = $v/@class and count(preceding-sibling::tr[not(@class=$v/@class)] = count($v/preceding-sibling::tr[not(@class=$v/@class)])]

If your API doesn't give you the opportunity to bind a variable, then I don't think it can be done, though I'm willing to be proved wrong.

You haven't said what your constraints are, but XPath 1.0 doesn't seem a good choice of technology for this particular problem.

Even in XPath 2.0 it's not particularly nice. You really need recursion, and that implies using XQuery or XSLT rather than pure XPath.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I am unable to bind a variable. The constraints are that I can only use XPath 1.0, but inefficiency isn't a problem due to small data sets. Thanks for the time to answer though :) –  user1300244 Mar 29 '12 at 12:22
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