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Assume that I have two arrays as follow:

$array1 = array(1, 3, 5);
$array2 = array('x'=> 1, 'y'=> 2, 'z'=> 5);

How to check that the two arrays are exactly the same in most efficient and proper way and it doesn't care the keynames of the *$array2.

I want to make a function which should return true if values are exactly the same, and false if any of the ones are different both in value(s) and number of elements.

Thanks for your time and reading.

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1  
if you want to check for values, use array_values function for second array and then check for equality –  Uday Sawant Mar 29 '12 at 9:07
1  
regarding exactly the same, what about the order of the elements? –  Yoshi Mar 29 '12 at 9:09
    
Then, tbh, I'd suggest to simply (after comparing the length) traverse one array and test for strict equality (===) of both elements. This way you can return false on the first none-equal element. –  Yoshi Mar 29 '12 at 9:15
    
@Uday Sawant & Yoshi yes, that's right, check the order ot the elements as well. –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:16
    
@Thavarith then equality check would be a good choice, additionally as suggested by @Yoshi you can use strict equality (===) to check data types of elements eg. 1 === '1'. –  Uday Sawant Mar 29 '12 at 9:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
 array_values($array1) === array_values($array2)

Assuming that arrays have same order.

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Converting the result of array_values() to string, no matter what the array content, will always result in the literal string Array, so this will always be true. –  DaveRandom Mar 29 '12 at 9:11
    
@DaveRandom Thanks mate, tottaly missed this –  dotoree Mar 29 '12 at 9:14
    
Yeah, thanks @dotoree, it does work well. –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:36
    
Actually, your code works well array_values does convert values to string unless using equality check. –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:39

In the simplest case you can just use array_diff. It ignores the keys in your second array, but also the order of the values. It would return an empty set if the arrays are equal:

 if (count(array_diff($array1, $array2)) == 0) {
    // equal

You could also compare the arrays directly, after stripping keys from the second:

 if ($array1 == array_values($array2)) {

That would additionally compare the order of contained values.

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1  
I think that the second example would probably be best to pass both arrays through array_values(), since in this situation one may not know that the keys of $array1 are contiguous without looping to check, and array_values() will correct this. Also you could safely check the result of array_diff() as a boolean in this example, if (!array_diff($array1, $array2)) { //equal is fairly safe and does not have the overhead of a call to count(). –  DaveRandom Mar 29 '12 at 9:18
    
Thanks @mario, I think the second using array_values work well. –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:37
    
It works well provided that we convert both arrays using array_values and comparing === –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:47
    
thanks to @DaveRandom for your comment here. –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:49

Try this

$array1 = array(1, 3, 5);
$array2 = array('x'=> 1, 'y'=> 2, 'z'=> 5);
$array2 = array_values($array2);
echo $array1 == $array2 ? 'true' : 'false';
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Thanks to @Uday Sawant, it works this way well! –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:33
    
It works well provided that we convert both arrays using array_values and comparing === –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:48

array_diff will do the job for you:

<?php
$array1 = array("a" => "green", "red", "blue", "red");
$array2 = array("b" => "green", "yellow", "red");
$result = array_diff($array1, $array2);
if(empty($result)){
    // arrays contain the same values!
}

?>
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Thanks @Paul Bain, in this case, what if the second arrays: $array2 contains sames values as $array1 and $array2 also has extra element? array_diff will return 0...so if-condition becomes true...which is not –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:26
    
array_diff returns an array containing the elements which are not in both arrays. If an element is in array2 but not array1, array_diff will return an array containing the element. In this case, empty($result) will be equal to false and therefore the check holds true. - php.net/array_diff –  Paul Bain Mar 29 '12 at 9:29
    
Nope, array_diff returns result of different of $array1 not $array2. i did check it. –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:55
    
Yes, and what does the function empty do!? –  Paul Bain Mar 29 '12 at 12:28

Create a class containing an array and make that class implement the Comparable interface, for example http://php.net/manual/language.oop5.interfaces.php#69467

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Thanks @Yoshi and Lobo –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:43
    
@Thavarith your're welcome! –  Lobo Mar 29 '12 at 9:56

like this:

<?php    
$array1 = array ("a" => "green", "b" => "brown", "c" => "blue", "red");    
$array2 = array ("a" => "green", "yellow", "red");    
$result = array_diff($array1, $array2);    
if(count($result) == 0)
{
  .......  
}    
?>
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Thanks @Code Monkey, in this case, what if the second arrays: $array2 contains sames values as $array1 and $array2 also has extra element? array_diff will return 0...so if-condition becomes true...which is not –  Thavarith Mar 29 '12 at 9:27

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