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How to finish the work correctly at the output end of the pipe? I need the writing thread to terminate or do some other work, while the reading thread reads all written data up to end.

Should I close the pipe at the writing end or what?

UPDATE 1

I want to clarify... According to given answers, am I correct thinking that by-design pipes behavior does not suppose any graceful termination?

I.e. once opened, the only way to stop piping is to break the pipe?

Conventional streams expect end of the stream signal, when read() method returns -1. Am right thinking that this never happens with piped streams?

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That's correct, read() returning -1 is how the stream notifies the caller that no more data is available. –  seand Mar 30 '12 at 2:11

3 Answers 3

It is enough just to close output stream.

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Yes, closing the PipedOutputStream results in a -1 on the PipedInputStream.

Looks pretty graceful to me! Here's my SSCCE:

import java.io.*;
import java.nio.charset.*;

public class SOPipe
{
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
    {
        PipedOutputStream os = new PipedOutputStream();
        PipedInputStream is = new PipedInputStream(os);

        ReaderThread readerThread = new ReaderThread(is);
        WriterThread writerThread = new WriterThread(os);

        readerThread.start();
        writerThread.start();

        readerThread.join();
        writerThread.join();

        System.out.println("Both Reader and Writer completed.");
        System.out.println("Main method returning normally now.");
    }

    private static final Charset LATIN1 = Charset.forName("latin1");

    public static class WriterThread extends Thread
    {
        private final PipedOutputStream _os;

        public WriterThread(PipedOutputStream os)
        {
            _os = os;
        }

        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                String msg = "Ceci n'est pas une pipe";
                byte[] msgBytes = msg.getBytes(LATIN1);
                System.out.println("WriterThread sending message: " + msg);
                for(int i = 0; i < msgBytes.length; i++)
                {
                    _os.write(msgBytes, i, 1);
                    System.out.println("WriterThread wrote a byte!");
                    _os.flush();
                }
                _os.close();
                System.out.println("[COMPLETED] WriterThread");
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    public static class ReaderThread extends Thread
    {
        private final PipedInputStream _is;

        public ReaderThread(PipedInputStream is)
        {
            _is = is;
        }

        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
                byte[] buffer = new byte[1];
                int read;
                while ((read = _is.read(buffer, 0, 1)) != -1)
                {
                    System.out.println("ReaderThread read a byte!");
                    baos.write(buffer, 0, read);
                }
                System.out.println("[COMPLETED] ReaderThread; received: " 
                        + new String(baos.toByteArray(), LATIN1));
                _is.close();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}
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You can extend PipedOutputStream class & override its write() method to add your custom logic, after it has written all the bytes to the piped output stream.

    public class CustomPipedOutput extends PipedOutputStream {

          @Override
          public void write(byte[] byteArray, int offset, int length){

            super.write(byteArray, offset, length);

            //-- Code to be executed after writing bytes
          }

          @Override
          public void close(){

            super.close();

            //-- Code to be executed after closing piped input stream
          }

   }

Similarly, can extend other methods if required accordingly.

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It would make more sense to override close() to detect end-of-data. write() will be called most likely multiple times while the commm is in progress. –  seand Mar 29 '12 at 13:16
    
According to manual, pipes are recommended to use with 2 threads. What "business logic" can help mar a termination? How can I synchronize termination signal with pipe position? Should I send tagged XML or UUENCODE contend over pipe for this??? If so then it would be better to write my own well designed pipe... –  Dims Mar 29 '12 at 13:36
    
@seand Yes, that makes sense. I had given another version of method write(byte), but it was for illustrative purpose only. –  Nayan Wadekar Mar 29 '12 at 14:19
    
@Dims it's up to you to design a data format that makes sense for your app. All the pipe / streams do is give you way to ship bytes across. Obviously your reader has to understand what the writer gave it. –  seand Mar 30 '12 at 2:13

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