Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a simple class for which I want to overload operator as below

class MyClass
{
   public:
      int first;

      template <typename T>
      T operator () () const { return first; }  
};

And the somewhere else I have

MyClass obj;

int i = obj(); // This gives me an error saying could not deduce
               // template argument for T

Can someone help me with this error, much appreciated. Thank you.

edit:

This has something to do with the operator(), for example if i replace the function with

    template <typename T>
    T get() const { return first;}

it works. Appreciate all the responses.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you wish the function call to be implicit then you'll have to apply the template to the class like this:

template <typename T>
class MyClass
{
  public:
  T first;

  T operator () () const { return first; }  
};

If it should be casted to another type then it should be:

template <typename T>
class MyClass
{
  public:
  T first;

  template <typename U>
  U operator () () const { return (U)first; }  
};
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want it to be implicit, but I want to avoid the template use for the entire class. If I cast it using member template and the call is explicit, even then it doesn't work. –  fadini Jun 14 '09 at 6:15
    
show me the current code using codepad.org –  the_drow Jun 14 '09 at 6:18
    
codepad.org/E30yRqTU –  fadini Jun 14 '09 at 6:25
    
This is the only way to do this: codepad.org/m6L1Ggo2 Consider redesigning your program. –  the_drow Jun 14 '09 at 7:12
    
wow ! Thanks a lot. Infact it worked without the cast in the return –  fadini Jun 14 '09 at 7:58

What you want to do is to provide a generic convector from Data to the userType. Consider something like this :

#include<iostream>
#include<string>
using namespace std;
class Data{
    public:
    	std::string str;
    	double var;

        template <typename UserType>
    	operator UserType() const { return  UserType(var);}
};

int main()
{
Data d;
d.var = 5.5;
cout << int(d);
cout<<"\n";
return 0;
}

Is this what you needed?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, but the reason I wanted to implement the operator() was that I have a templatized class which accesses a simple data structure based on a uniform interface using get and set methods. Then depending upon use one change the accessed element in the data structure without affecting the implementation. –  fadini Jun 14 '09 at 15:39

Compiler would face a quite an ambiguity when trying to deduce template arguments from code like this

template T operator () () const { return first; }

because for

int i = obj();

T can be not only int, but any type "castable" to int.

share|improve this answer

Did you try int i = obj<int>();?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I did. This is explicit ? I guess I think implicit wont work. –  fadini Jun 14 '09 at 6:03
1  
That's because you applied the template to the operator overload and not the class. –  SingleNegationElimination Jun 14 '09 at 6:05
    
Do you mean this use is not allowed ? or is there a way around it ? –  fadini Jun 14 '09 at 6:07
1  
fadini: The compiler can only work out (implicitly deduce) template parameters (like T) by looking at the types of arguments where it is called. It never looks at the function body. –  Doug Jun 14 '09 at 6:19
    
Doug: I understand. Just so I am completely clear, you are saying the explicit also shouldn't work ? i.e. int i = obj<int>(); // this did not work –  fadini Jun 14 '09 at 6:28

I am not sure why this is a template in the first place, you always return an int, right? Thanks

share|improve this answer
    
In this class i always return an int, but where i call it I have function call obj() or obj<int>() which is a generic call, i.e. it can be to another class with first as float or something else. I want to try and keep the call interface same without referring to the data. –  fadini Jun 14 '09 at 7:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.