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I am trying to get the difference between 2 containers but the containers are in a weird structure so I dont know whats the best way to perform a difference on it. One containers type and structure I cannot alter but the others I can(variable delims).

delims = ['on','with','to','and','in','the','from','or']
words = collections.Counter(s.split()).most_common()
# words results in [("the",2), ("a",9), ("diplomacy", 1)]

#I want to perform a 'difference' operation on words to remove all the delims words
descriptive_words = set(words) - set(delims)

# because of the unqiue structure of words(list of tuples) its hard to perform a difference
# on it. What would be the best way to perform a difference? Maybe...

delims = [('on',0),('with',0),('to',0),('and',0),('in',0),('the',0),('from',0),('or',0)]
words = collections.Counter(s.split()).most_common()
descriptive_words = set(words) - set(delims)

# Or maybe
words = collections.Counter(s.split()).most_common()
n_words = []
for w in words:
   n_words.append(w[0])
delims = ['on','with','to','and','in','the','from','or']
descriptive_words = set(n_words) - set(delims)
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about just modifying words by removing all the delimiters?

words = collections.Counter(s.split())
for delim in delims:
    del words[delim]
share|improve this answer
    
that looks efficient I think I'll use it but words is a list of tuples how can I say "words[delim]"? –  Jake M Mar 29 '12 at 9:45
    
@JakeM - apply it directly on the Counter object. –  eumiro Mar 29 '12 at 9:48
    
Ah, I was thinking words was the Counter object –  John La Rooy Mar 29 '12 at 9:49

This I how I would do it:

delims = set(['on','with','to','and','in','the','from','or'])
# ...
descriptive_words = filter(lamdba x: x[0] not in delims, words)

Using the filter method. A viable alternative would be:

delims = set(['on','with','to','and','in','the','from','or'])
# ...
decsriptive_words = [ (word, count) for word,count in words if word not in delims ]

Making sure that the delims are in a set to allow for O(1) lookup.

share|improve this answer
    
the first method uses 'in', does that mean on each comparision we are iterating over the whole of delims? –  Jake M Mar 29 '12 at 9:48
    
not if they're a set or dict. O(1) lookup, the docs say. –  brice Mar 29 '12 at 9:51

The simplest answer is to do:

import collections

s = "the a a a a the a a a a a diplomacy"
delims = {'on','with','to','and','in','the','from','or'}
// For older versions of python without set literals:
// delims = set(['on','with','to','and','in','the','from','or'])
words = collections.Counter(s.split())

not_delims = {key: value for (key, value) in words.items() if key not in delims}
// For older versions of python without dict comprehensions:
// not_delims = dict(((key, value) for (key, value) in words.items() if key not in delims))

Which gives us:

{'a': 9, 'diplomacy': 1}

An alternative option is to do it pre-emptively:

import collections

s = "the a a a a the a a a a a diplomacy"
delims = {'on','with','to','and','in','the','from','or'}
counted_words = collections.Counter((word for word in s.split() if word not in delims))

Here you apply the filtering on the list of words before you give it to the counter, and this gives the same result.

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If you're iterating through it anyway why bother converting them to sets?

dwords = [delim[0] for delim in delims]
words  = [word for word in words if word[0] not in dwords]
share|improve this answer
    
@Rob Young yeah I am trying to avoid iterating over them for efficiency. Any solution that doesn't iterate is best I think –  Jake M Mar 29 '12 at 9:47
    
Bad idea. It would be O(n^2), wouldn't it? –  brice Mar 29 '12 at 9:50

For performance, you can use lambda functions

filter(lambda word: word[0] not in delim, words)
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filter+lambda is less readable than a list comprehension, and the list comprehension can often be faster. –  Lattyware Mar 29 '12 at 10:11
    
Secondly, this is still doing O(n^2) since delims is a list. –  brice Mar 29 '12 at 10:27

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